Skip to main content

Full text of "The Massachusetts magazine : devoted to Massachusetts history, genealogy, biography"

See other formats


REYNOLDS HISTUKioftL 
GENEALOot COLLECTION 



ALLEN COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY 



3 1 



833 01746 5003 



GENEALOGY 
974.4 
M3876 
1911 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/massachusettsmagv4sale 






/A 



*&,, 







k /> **v 



4 j J I (X 



(x 



18p!f!)itl Jlparterlik 



Vol. IV. 



•'z' r O « 



y 



THE 



MASSACHVSETTS 
MAGAZINE 



X 6988? 



*?o 




Published bytheSalem Press Co. Salem, Mass. USA 



tirijc JJfctssarfjitscifs JHaijamtc. 

A Quarterly c7VTagazine Devoted to History, Genealogy and Biography 
Thomas Franklin Waters, Editor, ipswich, mass. 

ASSOCIATE AXD ADVISORY EDITORS 

Thomas Wentworth Higginson, George Sheldon, Dr. Frank A. Gardner 

CAMBRIDGE, MASS. DEKRFIELD, MASS. SALEM, m^. 

Lucie M. Gardner, Charles A. Flagg, John N. McClintock, Albert W. Dennis 

qaipm wi Ktt W " !, " v '- 1 ' n * •» " DORCUESTER, M.^S. SALEM, MAS*. 



WASHINGTON, D. C. 



Issued in January, April, July and October. Subscription, $2.50 per year, Single copies, 75c 



VOL. IV 



JANUARY, 191 1 



GZxxxxUixla af fl|is f ssuc. 



NO. 1 



The Boston Public Library R. A. Douglas-Lithgow, M.D., LL.D. . 1 

Jethro Coffin's Home . . R. A. Douglas-Lithgow, M.D., LL.D. . 23 

Colonel Ruggles "Woodbridge's Regiment F. A.Gardner, M.D. . 29 

Department of the American Revolution F. A. Gardner, M.D. . 43 

Massachusetts in Literature Charles A. Flagg . 49 

Criticism and Comment 58 

Family Genealogies Lucie M. Gardner . 60 

Our Editorial Pages Thomas F. Waters . 71 



CORRESPONDENCE of a business nature should be sent to The Massachusetts Magazine, Salem, Maes. 

CORRESPONDENCE in regard to contributions to the Magazine mar be sent to the editor, Rev. T. F. 
Waters, Ipswich, Mass., or to the office of publication in Saiem. 

BOOKS for review may be sent to the office of publication in Salem. Books should not be sent to individual 
editors of the Magazine, unless by previous correspondence the editor consents to review the book. 

SUBSCRIPTIONS should be sent to Thl Massachusetts Magazine, Salem, Mass. Subscriptions are $2.50 
payable in advance, post paid to any address in the Cnited States or Canada. To foreign countries in the 
Postal Union, $2.75. Single copies of back numbers, 75 cents each. 

REMITTANCES may be made in currency or two cent postage stamps; many subscriptions are sent through 
the mail in this way, and they are seldom "lost, but such remittances must be at the risk of the sender. To 
avoid all danger of loss send by post-office money order, bank check, or express money order. 

CHANGES OF ADDRESS. When a subscriber makes a change of address, he should notify the publishers, 
giving both his old and new addresses. The publishers cannot be responsible for lost copies, if they are not 
notified of such changes. 

ON SALE. Copies of this maeazine are on sale in Boston, at W. B. Clark's & Co., 26 Tremont Street, Old 
Corner Book Store, 29 Bromfield Street, Geo. E. Littlelield, 67 Cornhill, Smith & McCance, 3-' Brom field Street; 
inNew York, at John Wanamaker's, Broadwav, 4th, 9th and 10th Streets: in Philadelphia, Am. Baptist Pub. 
Society, 1630 Chestnut Street; in Washington, a't Brentanos, F & 13th St.; in Chicago, at A. C. McClurg's ft Co., 
221 Wabash Ave.; in London, at B. F. btevens & Brown, 4 Trafalgar Sq. Also on saie at principal stands of 
N. E. News Co. 

Entered as second-class matter March 13, 1908, at the post-office at Salem, Mass., under the act of Congress 
of March 3, 1879. Office of publication, 300 Essex Street, Salem, Maes. 




THE BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 






By R. A. Douglass-Lithgow, M.D., LL.D. 



It was not until 1675 that the settlers 'in Massachusetts had so far 
developed their civilising influences as to make the establishment of a circu- 
lating free Public Library desirable, and when they succeeded in their 
laudable enterprise, they founded the first free Library in the United States. 

It was located in the Boston Town House, where the old State House 
now stands, but was destroyed by fire in 1711. When the old State House 
was built, in 1712, the Library was re-instituted, but this building also was 
burned in 1747, and from this time up to May, 1854 — over a hundred years — 
the citizens of Boston were wholly deprived of the privileges associated with 
a free circulating library. 

In 1848, however, an Act was passed by the State Legislature authorising 
the City of Boston to establish and maintain a Public Library; but it was 
not until May 24th, 1852, that the first Board of Trustees was organized, 
and the founding of the Library may be dated from that day. 

In March, 1854, the Trustees succeeded in obtaining two rooms in a 
building used for official purposes in Mason Street, and here the actual 
foundation of the Boston Library was inaugurated with about 16,000 volumes. 
These premises being utterly inadequate, in November of the same year an 
ordinance was issued appointing Commissioners to erect a suitable building, 
and in January, 1858, a new library, in Boylston Street, was dedicated, the 
cost of which, with land, was about $365,000. To this building were moved 
70,000 volumes. 

In 1870 the first Branch Library was established in East Boston. 



4 THE MASSACHUSETTS MAGAZINE 

In 1878, the Trustees were organized into a Corporation under the name 
of the Trustees of the Public Library of the City of Boston. 

In 1880, the Commonwealth of Massachusetts gave to the City of Boston 
a tract of land on condition that a Public Library should be erected upon it, 
and, in 1883, the Common Council and Aldermen of the City appropriated 
the sum of $180,000 for the purchase of additional land adjoining that granted 
by the Commonwealth, also an additional sum of $450,000 for the erection of 
a Library building, fronting on Copley Square. 

On March 11th, 1895, the new Public Library, as it now stands, was 
opened with over 600,000 volumes, and at a total cost, exclusive of land, of 
$2,368,000. 

The building of the Boston Public Library is, without doubt, one of the 
most beautiful Library edifices in the world, and facile princeps among the 
public buildings in the United States. It occupies 65,000 square feet of land, 
and has a floor area of 150,000 square feet.* The building is two hundred 
and twenty-five feet long, two hundred and twenty-seven feet deep, and its 
height from the side-walk to the top of the fagade cornice is seventy feet. 

This noble architectural monument, built in the Grseco-Roman or Ren- 
aissance style, in strictly classical design, is said to have been modelled after 
the pattern of the Bibliotheque de Ste. Genevieve, in Paris, but differs from 
it in many essential particulars 

The entire structure is built of gray granite, containing an excess of 
red felspar which, in a strong light, gives it a pinkish tinge, and it is raised 
upon a broad platform of granite which adds dignity to the elevation. This 
platform extends round the three facades of the building, becoming, on the 
south side, the side-walk of Blagden Street. Elsewhere three steps high, the 
platform rises six steps in front of the main entrance, where, at either corner, 
are two large pedestals, not at present occupied, but intended to support two 
heroic-sized statues — one representing Art, and the other Science — which 
are not yet completed. In front of the platform low buffer-posts of granite 
are scattered at intervals along the side-walk. 

The front f acade, with an eastern aspect overlooking Copley Square, 
consists of two storeys, the lower rough and heavily built, and the upper 
"arcaded for its whole length with thirteen magnificent window arches." 



* Benton, The Working of the Public Library. 



THE rOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 5 

Above the arcade is a frieze — further up an ornate cornice, and still higher, 
a roof of purple tiles overlooking the quadrangular courtyard within. 

Three arched door-ways form the main entrance., and a low seat of 
granite extends along the length of the facade. The arched door-ways are 
closed with heavy wrought-iron gates, and the under-surfaces of the entrance 
arches are carved with a double row of deep rosetted panels. Above, on 
either side of the arches are large branched candelabra, four in number, of 
wrought-iron, carrying clusters of lanterns for electric lights. The key-stones 
of the side arches are beautifully carved, and on the key-stone of the middle 
arch is " the helmeted head of the Roman Minerva," over which is carved 
" Free to all." 

Three of the window-arches in the arcade, over the entrance doors, 
contain the seals of the Commonwealth, the City, and the Library sculptured 
in pink marble. The beautiful arcade in the second story is continued on 
the Boylston Street facade to the end of the building, and comprises eleven 
arches. Excepting over the main entrance, the lower portions of the twenty- 
seven arcade windows are filled with " memorial tablets inscribed with the 
names of the greatest writers, artists, and scientists of history." 

" It is only in front that the Library is two storeys high ; on the other 
sides it is three storeys high, with two mezzanine storeys in addition, the 
latter being lighted from the interior Court around which the Library is built." 

There is also a line of medallions — thirty-three altogether, cut in granite, 
and extending round the building, one in each of the spandrels of the window- 
arches. 

On the frieze above the arcade is an inscription on each faqade of the 
building; on the Dartmouth Street side: — "THE PUBLIC LIBRARY OF 
THE CITY OF BOSTON: BUILT BY THE PEOPLE, AND DEDI- 
CATED TO THE ADVANCEMENT OF LEARNING A. D. MDCCC- 
LXXXVUI." 

On the Bovlston Street side: — "THE COMMONWEALTH RE- 
QUIRES THE EDUCATION OF THE PEOPLE AS THE SAFE- 
GUARD OF ORDER AND LIBERTY." 

And on the Blagden Street : — " MDCCCLII. FOUNDED THROUGH 
THE MUNIFICENCE AND PUBLIC SPIRIT OF CITIZENS." 

The Boylston Street entrance consists of three fine arches also, and 
although originally intended as a porte cochcre, it is only the right arch which 
is open and now used as a means of access to the Lecture Hall. These 
arches, like those of the main entrance in design, are much less elaborate 
in detail. 



6 THE MASSACHUSETTS MAGAZINE 

There is a single entrance in Blagden Street, " plain but dignified," lead- 
ing to the administration offices of the Library. 

Space will not permit any detailed reference to the interior of this 
palatial edifice which sustains the simple grandeur and dignity of the Renais- 
sance style of architecture consistently preserved throughout. 

The main entrance leads to the vestibule (where there is a heroic statue 
of Sir Harr^ Vane, Governor of Massachusetts in 1636-7, by MacMonnies), 
thence by three doors into the Entrance Hall approaching the splendid Grand 
Staircase of yellow Sienna marble, conducting to the principal rooms on the 
second floor. 

From the Entrance Hall, corridors, right and left, lead to the Newspaper 
and Periodical Rooms, the Catalogue Room, and the Interior Court, and, on 
the floor of the Hall itself — laid with Georgia marble — are several devices, 
inlaid with brass, including the dates commemorating the foundation of the 
Library and the erection of the building. 

The Interior Court around which the Library is built is one of the 
most attractive portions of the building. The walls are of Pompeian brick, 
and around the first storey of the Court is a beautiful arcaded cloister. The 
Grand-Staircase Hall projects into the Court, and from the Staircase landing 
a fine balcony overlooks the fountain in the centre of the Court. 

In this outline sketch of the interior I am compelled to suppress any 
notice of the manifold and various artistic and architectural details which 
go to sustain the consistent classical character of the building, and to enhance 
its striking beauty ; but no visitor can escape noticing at almost every step the 
harmonious proportions, the elegance and dignity of the whole arrangement, 
and the innumerable evidences of cultured artistic taste which characterise 
the working out of the entire scheme. 

The wall of the Staircase Corridor and the panels of the Staircase Hall 
are decorated with mural paintings by the late Puvis de Chavannes. The 
series of pictures on the Corridor Wall are named " The Muses Welcoming 
the Genius of Enlightenment." Eight other paintings on the Grand Staircase 
Hall represent respectively Philosophy, Astronomy, History, Chemistry, 
Physics, Pastoral Poetry, Dramatic Poetry and Epic Poetry. 

In each of the lobbies at either end of the Grand Staircase Corridor, 
that on the south, known as the Pompeian Lobby, and that on the north as 
the Venetian are some striking decorations, the former by Mr. Garnsey, and 
the latter by Mr. J. Lindon Smith; they are both rich in color, and ad- 
mirable in execution. 



THE BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 7 

In the Children's first room is a series of noteworthy paintings by Mr. 
Howard Pyle illustrative of the life of George Washington and of Colonial 
times. In the Children's second room is an interesting ceiling decoration— "The 
Triumph of Time," which contains thirteen winged figures. The painting is 
by Mr. John Elliott. 

Bates Hall — the main reading-room of the Library — is a magnificent 
and splendidly proportioned hall, two hundred and eighteen feet long and 
forty-two and a half wide, and, in height, fifty feet from the floor to the 
crown of the arches. The ends of the Hall are semicircular with half-domed 
ceilings. Over the main entrance is a richly sculptured little balcony — 
a beautiful example of Renaissance work. 

Bates Hall accommodates nearly three hundred readers ; it contains thirty- 
three heavy tables, with eight chairs to each, also the Centre Desk for the 
charging and returning of books. Open shelves of books surround the hall 
to the number of about 8,000, and some two dozen marble and bronze statues 
of distinguished litterateurs and others are effectively ranged around the walls. 

At the south end of this great hall, separated by a screen is the Card- 
Catalogue Room, one of the most important rooms in the Library, contain- 
ing in the drawers of thirteen handsome oak cabinets nearly a million cards. 

At the northern end of Bates Hall, beyond a screen, is the Reference 
Library consisting principally of encyclopaedias, dictionaries, etc., in many 
languages. 

Among the numerous doors in Bates Hall, that in the south end, leading 
to the Delivery Room, and that in the north end, leading to the Children's 
Room, are the most important with the exception of that entering from the 
Staircase Corridor. 

The Delivery Room is sixty-four feet long by thirty-three wide, and is 
particularly remarkable for Mr. Abbey's splendid series of mural decorations 
representing " The Quest of the Holy Grail," which occupies the entire space 
between the wainscot and the ceiling. 

The alcove of the Delivery Room contains all the complicated mechanical 
arrangements for the rapid delivery of books applied for. The stack itself 
is in six storeys and is capable of accommodating 500,000 books, which, added 
to those which can be shelved on the Special Library floor in Bates Hall, 
the Periodical Rooms, etc., would make the Library's total capacity about 
a million volumes. 

The Executive Rooms, including rooms for the Librarian, Trustees' 
Room, etc., are arranged en suite, and are reached directly from the Delivery 



8 THE MASSACHUSETTS MAGAZINE 

Room by a Corridor. Off the Blagden Street staircase is the Trustees' Room, 
lighted from the south side. This is a very sumptuous room, containing 
luxurious furnishings and several valuable pictures. 

The Children's Rooms are at the north end of the Corridor on the second 
floor after ascending the Grand Staircase. The main room contains about 
nine thousand volumes adapted for juvenile reading; the second room is 
arranged as a reading and reference room. 

Beyond the Children's Second Room is the Lecture Hall, which is 
spacious, well-ventilated, and capable of comfortably seating 300 people. At 
the west end of the hall is an extensive and serviceable stage. Here from 
twenty to thirty Lectures are given every year by well-known lecturers, who 
receive no compensation. The subjects of the lectures are, for the most part, 
connected with the fine arts, travels, and civic aesthetic development. 

Going down the stairway from the Boylston Street entrance, to the left 
will be found the Patent Room, in which the collection of Patents, etc., is said 
to be " the best in the United States out of Washington." It contains the 
Patent publications of all European and Colonial countries, in addition to those 
of the United States, and about 78,000 volumes are used yearly. " The files 
of the English Patents go back to 1617, and of the United States to 1840." 
In an adjoining room are 6,356 bound volumes of American and foreign news- 
papers, and over a hundred files are regularly kept up. 

The Departments of the Library are organized under the following 
heads : — 

1. Executive Department, including the Librarian, Assistant Librarian, 
Auditor, Clerk, Custodian of the Stock-room, etc. 

2. Catalogue Department, including the Chief Cataloguer and Assist- 
ants. 

3. Ordering Department. 

4. Shelf Department. 

5. Bates Hall, including Custodian and Assistants. 

6. Special Libraries, including also all persons employed in the Depart- 
ments of Music and Fine Arts. 

7. Statistical Department, including documents and manuscripts. 

8. Periodical and Newspaper Rooms. 

9. Patent Department. 
10. Issue Department. 



THE BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 9 

11. Children's Rooms. 

12. Registration Department. 

13. Branch Department. 

As Mr. Benton,* the Chairman of the Trustees, says: "Through this 
organization the general work of the Library is carried on, and there are 
annually issued for direct home use nearly 300,000 volumes at the Central 
Library,' and from the Central Library through the Branches about 85,000 
more, while the Branches and Reading Rooms also issue more than a million 
volumes for home use, making the entire issue for home use more than 
1,500,000 annually." 

In the Department of Statistics and Documents is the valuable collection 
of the American Statistical Association, which was presented to the Library in 
1898. It is located in the west wing of the building, and is reached from the 
Interior Court. 

It contains about 8,500 volumes exclusive of the United States docu- 
ments (4,400) and British Parliamentary Papers (6,900). 

It also contains an important and valuable collection of manuscripts and 
broadsides. 

Reverting for a moment to the Newspaper and Periodical Rooms in the 
north-east corner of the building — the former a large, well-lighted room — 
. the Library takes regularly more than 300 newspapers, in addition to between 
eighty and ninety foreign papers. These are purchased from the income of a 
fund of $50,000 given for the purpose by the late William C. Todd. Two- 
Periodical Rooms on the north side of the building open out of the News- 
paper Room, and here will be found fifteen hundred periodicals published in 
all parts of the world. 

Having thus far traversed the two lower storeys of the Library we ascend 
to the third floor, by a straight flight of stairs from the Venetian Lobby. 

On this floor are deposited the priceless treasures of the Library, the 
Special Collections which have made the Boston Public Library famous 
wherever literature is appreciated and exalted. 

The rooms and corridors which contain these invaluable collections are 
approached through a lofty gallery popularly known as " Sargent's Hall " 
from the name of the artist who decorated it. 

The following is almost a complete list of the Special Collections in the 
Library, and the number of volumes in each, in 1907-1908: — 



* Opus cit. 






10 THE MASSACHUSETTS MAGAZINE 

Patent Library, obvious 10,132 

Bowditch Library, Mathematics 7,356 

Parker, Theodore, General and Theological 13,888 

Prince Library, Americana 2,052 

Ticknor Library, Spanish, Portuguese, etc. 6,473 
Barton Library, Shakespearean, Early and Miscellaneous 13,669 

Franklin Library, Works, books and pamphlets, illustrating 

Life 793 

Thayer Library, Illustrated Books 5,390 

Lewis, John A., Library, Americana 696 

Gilbert Library, Dramatic Literature 422 

Tosti Collection, Engravings 129 

Hunt Library, Books on West Indies 669 

John Adams Library, Political, Legal and General 3,019 

Chamberlain Library, Autographs and MSS. 422 

Brown, Allen, Library, Music and Drama 10,805 

Military Library, obvious 1,872 

AJ. S. Congressional Documents, obvious 5,679 

'Great Britain, Parliamentary Papers, obvious 7,493 

••Galatea Library, History of Women's Suffrage, etc. 2,304 

«Codman Library, Landscape Gardening and Architecture 806 

'Arts Library, obvious 3,043 

Newspaper Room, obvious 6,514 

Browning Collection, obvious 496 

Statistical Department, obvious 14,714 

Charlotte Harris Collection, Americana 4,704 

JMoulton, Louise Chandler Collection, Poetry and General, 1,200 

.and several" others of minor importance. 

v 

Tt would require a whole treatise to adequately describe the contents of 
'these Special Collections, but, in order to give some faint idea of what they 
•consist, I propose to select some of them for consideration as indicating the 
•inestimable value of the whole. 

Incidentally it may be stated that History is very amply represented in 
.the Boston Public Library: it is, indeed, a rich mine of historic lore, 
precious in its every aspect, and as extensive as it is varied. Here the 
•student can find chronicles of the earliest history of ancient peoples from 
jevery country in the world, — records of civilization from its dawn, — the 



THE BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 11 

evolution of religion, and the progress of the human race from its infancy, 
the foundations of primitive government, the gradual advancement of knowl- 
edge and learning, the scroll of the Dark Ages, and the growth of ecclesias- 
ticism,. the development of Literature, Science and Art during the Renais- 
sance, the making of history as recorded in the sown fields of Time, in every 
epoch, the rise and fall of empires and kingdoms, "the glory that was 
Greece, and the grandeur that w r as Rome," the sanguinary battles between 
Might and Right, the increasing power and influence of the People in the 
sphere of Government, the dominance of law, the diffusion of ethics, the 
laws of economics, and public hygiene, and the onward, triumphant march of 
Mankind to its destiny. Analysis of works on History in General Library, 
and in Special Libraries. 

General History, Biography, etc. 22,399 

American History, Biography, etc. 109,008 

English History, Biography, etc. 78,661 

French History, Biography, etc. 36,434 

Italian History, Biography, etc. 14,379 

German History, Biography, etc. 27,825 

Spanish and Portuguese History, etc. 8,850 

Oriental History, etc. 22,199 

Ecclesiastical History, etc. 50,199 

Total 369,954 

The Prince Library was gathered by the Rev. Thomas Prince and be- 
queathed by him to the old South Church of Boston, of which he had been 
pastor. In the year 1866 the collection was deposited by the deacons of the 
old South Church in the Boston Public Library. 

It contains two copies of the Bay Psalm Book, printed at Cambridge in 
1640, which was the first book printed in New England. There are also 
copies of the first edition of Eliot's Indian Bible, Cambridge, 1663, and of 
the second edition of 1685, and a copy of Eliot's Indian Primer, Boston, 1720. 
The library is very rich in early New England History, and includes the 
Mather Papers, 1632-1689; Cotton Papers, 1632-1680; Cotton and Prince 
Papers, Hinckley Papers, 1676-1699; etc. Eliot's Indian New Testament and 
Psalms — the latter translated from the Bay Psalm-Book; Polyglot Bible, 
1655-1657; " Animad- Version upon the Antisynodalia Americana," 1664; 
"Historical Register," 1716-23-26; "Collection of Treaties " (American Col- 



12 THE MASSACHUSETTS MAGAZINE 

onies) ; many old editions of Classics; Hottinger's "Ecclesiastical History"; 
Sleidanus' " Ecclesiastical History " ; " Abridgement of all the British Sta- 
tutes in force since Magna Charta " ; Faller's "Church History of Britain 
until 1648"; Strype's " Annals of the Reformation in the Church of England, 
1558-80 " ; Usher's " Britannicarum ecclesiarum antiquitates " ; Clarke's " His- 
torian's Guide " ; Doglione's " England's Remembrancer, 1600-75 " ; " English 
Chronology," 1688-96; Speed's "History of Great Britain"; " Rushworth's 
Historical Collections," 1617-60, 1618-29; "Historical and Chronological 
Theatre," translated from Schuppio, 1662; ''Historical account of all the 
tryals and attainders of high treason, from 1636-84"; Bailie's " Operis His- 
torici et Chronologici," London, 1716"; Boxhora's " Historia universales 
Sacra et profana " ; Carlo's " Chronicon " ; Cleever's " Historiarum totius 
mundi epitome " ; Hildebrandus' " Synopsis Historian universalis " ; Pezel's 
" Mellif icium historicum " ; Raleigh's " History of the World " ; Sleidanus' 
" De quatuor Summis imperiis " ; " History of the life, reign, and death of 
Queen Mary," 1682; "History of Rome," by Livius Paterinus, Paterculus, 
Suetonius, Tacitus, etc. 

The John A. Lewis Library, presented by his widow in 1890, consists 
almost entirely of early books relating to the history of Massachusetts and 
New England. It contains nearly a hundred publications of Cotton Mather, 
of Increase Mather, seventy; of Samuel Mather, twenty-five; of Richard 
Mather, four; and of Nathaniel Mather, one. There are also many books 
of Prince, William Cooper, Foxcroft, Willard. John Cotton, and William 
Penn; also "The Rudiments of Latin Prosody," and a "Dissertation on 
Letters," by James Otis. There is also a copy of Hubbard's " Narrative of 
the Troubles of New England," with the extremely rare map of New Eng- 
land known as the-" White Hills Map," 1677; Whitbourne's "Discourse and 
Discovery of Newfoundland," 1622 ; Hooker's " Survey of the Summe of 
Church Discipline," 1648, and " The Soule's Preparation for Christ," 1632 ; 
UnderhhTs " Newes from America," 1638; Wood's "New England's Pros- 
pect, 3d edition, 1639; John Robinson's "People's Plea," 1618; Hooke's 
" New England's Teares," 1641 ; Ward's " Simple Cobler of Aggawam," 1647; 
and many others. Of 18th century books may be mentioned Morton's " New 
England Memorial," 1721; Mayhew's "Indian Convert," 1727; some of 
Franklin's issues, and several copies of " Poor Richard's improved Almanack." 

The Barlow Library was purchased (with a special appropriation from 
the City government of $20,000) at the sale of the late S. L. M. Barlow, of 
Brooklyn, in 1890, and its many volumes of Americana are of unusual rarity. 



THE BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 13 

It was at this sale that the Library secured for $6,500 a seventeenth century 
transcript entitled " A True Copie of the Court Booke of the Governor and 
Society of the Massachusetts Bay in New England," — the only perfect copy 
known. ' This library also contains the Latin version of 1493, of the first 
letter of Columbus to the Noble Lord Raphael Sanchez, announcing the Dis- 
covery of America, (the only known copy of this edition in America), 
Shakespeare's works, including the separate issues of the plays and poems, 
Troiana," 1486; Thurocz's ''Chronicles of the Kings of Hungary," 1488; 
Hymnes," 1596; " Prothalamion," 1596; "Complaints," 1591. 

Without particularising further, it may be said that the conjoined libraries 
of Prince, Lewis, and Barlow constitute a treasure-house of New England 
history which, if equalled, is unsurpassed anywhere. 

The Barton Library was collected by Thomas Pennant Barton between 
the years 1834 and 1866. The original collection has been materially increased 
by purchases by the Trustees. It now contains many hundred editions of 
Shakespeare's works, including the separate issues of the plays and poems 
and amounts altogether to nearly 14,000 volumes. 

In this library are the first four folios, with reproductions ; twenty-two 
copies of the early quarto editions of single plays, with many later editions 
of the quartos, besides thousands of books and pamphlets on the Works and 
Life of Shakespeare. A catalogue of this world-famous Shakespearean col- 
lection was published by Mr. J. M. Hubbard, in two large octavo volumes 
(including the miscellaneous portion of the Boston Shakespearean Library) 
in 1878, which may be consulted at the Public Library. 

The Barton library is remarkable for its many early editions of dramatic 
literature, while poetry, the classics and history are represented by many 
choice and unique compositions. 

As examples of early printing may be instanced " Colonne's Historia 
Troiana," 1486; Thurocz's "Chronicles of the Kings of Hungary," 1488; 
" Gesta Pomanorum," three editions before 1490; "Historia Alexandria 
1486; " Albumasar Flores Astrologie," before 1488; " Bucolicum Carmen," 
by Calpurnius Siculus, 1491. 

Of rare books may be cited Spenser's " Daphnaida," 1591; " Fowre 
Hymnes," 1596; "Prothalamion," 1596; "Complaints," 1591; Holinshed's 
"Chronicles," 1547 and 1587; De Bry's "Voyages," 1590-1634, in sixteen 
volumes; The "Vinegar" Bible, 1717; first editions of many of the English 
dramatists of the 17th century; Greene's " Groatsworth of Wit," 1629; " Eng- 
land's Parnassus," 1600; Clark's " Polimanteia," 1595, — containing nearly the 



■'■■■ 



14 THE MASSACHUSETTS MAGAZINE 

earliest mention of Shakespeare; Scot's "Witchcraft," 1584; Goulart's "Ad- 
mirable Histories," 1607; "Roman de la Rose," 1529; Les Marguerites de la 
Marguerite de Navarre, 1547; La Fontaine's " Contes et Nouvelles," 1762, 
illustrated by Charles Eisen ; Folengo's "Macaronics," in editions of 1517, 
1521, 1692, 1734 (in six volumes, printed on vellum), and 1768; " Cancionero 
General," 1573; etc. 

The Barton library is said to be " the best in America in the department of 
early English dramatic literature, its collection of works by and relating to 
Shakespeare being unequalled in the world, outside of two or three of the 
great English libraries." 

The Ticknor Collection of Spanish, Portuguese, and Italian books is 
almost unrivalled, containing as it does many rare volumes which were sup- 
pressed by the ecclesiastical authorities. It was bequeathed to the Boston 
Public Library by George Ticknor, the historian, together with $4,000 to 
provide for its increase. The original number of volumes presented was 
3,907, but they have since increased to 6,743. Among many rarities in this 
collection may be mentioned a copy of the Polyglot Bible of Cardinal Ximenes, 
in six volumes, printed at Alcata de Henares in 1514-17. 

The Theodore Parker library is rich in dictionaries, grammars, and 
encyclopaedias in many languages. It is particularly strong in the depart- 
ments of History, Literary History, Theology, Philosophy, and the Classics. 
American history is well represented, and especially that in connection with 
the anti-slavery controversy. 

The Allen Brown Library of Music, in the Music Room off Sargent's 
Hall, is probably the finest collection of music in existence, consisting of 10,805 
volumes beautifully bound in leather of various colors, and is rich in rare 
scores, w r hile containing a large amount of historical and biographical material. 

Mr. Brown has recently presented a dramatic collection of 3,500 volumes 
to the Library, and, still more recently, the Library has had a valuable acces- 
sion of volumes on music from another source. 

In addition to the special libraries already alluded to, it may be stated 
that the Bowditch collection is mathematical; the Tosti consists of engrav- 
ings; the Hunt library of works on the West Indies to the number of nearly 
700; the Franklin library, the gift of Dr. S. A. Green, who endowed it, of 
books written by Benjamin Franklin, and pamphlets and prints illustrating his 
life; and the Thayer collection, of illustrated works, containing several thou- 
sands of portraits, the gift of four sisters. 

The Fine Arts Room, spacious and lofty, is situated in the southern cor- 



THE BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 15 

ridor, opposite the entrance to the Barton-Ticknor collections in the northern 
corridor, and contains over 10,000 photographs of works of art from all over 
the world, and, in an adjoining room, is every facility for drawing and sketch- 
ing, for the benefit of students. Here, also, special artistic and literary collec- 
tions from the treasures of the Library are displayed from time to time, 
which have elicited much public interest. This room also contains excellent 
copies of rare pieces of sculpture. 

The Boston Public Library has probably the best collection, outside the 
British Museum, of English County and Town histories, books on Heraldry, 
Parish Registers, Harleian Society's Publications, Rolls of British Record 
Office from the time of William the Conqueror, etc. All these are inval- 
uable in genealogical investigation ; also of 

1. Families, American and English. 

2. Town Histories in New England. 

3. County and Town Histories in United States. 

These are not listed in the printed list, but are to be found in the Card 
Catalogue. 

The Boston Public Library and the New England Historic Genealogical 
Society were established on parallel lines, and both are very rich in gen- 
ealogical matter. These two libraries are in a sense complementary to each 
other, inasmuch as the Public Library possesses treasures which the N. E. 
Hist. Genealogical Society does not possess, and vice versa. 

Southern and Western genealogy are more strongly represented in the 
Congressional Library and in the Newberry Library in Chicago, but the Bos- 
ton Library is probably strongest in the genealogy of New England.* 

In conclusion, the very valuable collection of autographs presented to 
the Library by Judge Mellen Chamberlain is stored in a small room off the 
Librarian's Room, and in the upper mezzanine room, which is reached by a 
small flight of stairs. " It is especially rich in American autographs, and 
altogether is one of the most valuable and comprehensive in the country." 

" One of the Chamberlain manuscripts is in the handwriting of Governor 
Bradford, and is signed by him and by four other persons who came over 
in the Mayflower, including John Alden and Miles Standish." * 

Brief reference must be made here to Mr. Sargent's grand scheme for 
the decoration of the so-called " Sargent Hall," which he described as " The 

[Ed. Note. — If there is an exception to this statement, it is the New England His- 
toric Genealogical Society. 
* Benton: Opus cit. 



16 THE MASSACHUSETTS MAGAZINE 

Triumph of Religion," — a mural decoration illustrating certain stages of 
Jewish and Christian History." Unfortunately only the two ends of the hall 
are finished, — one representing the ascendancy of Monotheism over Poly- 
theism, and the other " The Crucifixion." They have been greatly ad- 
mired, and are undeniably artistic, and in the highest style of art ; but the 
work accomplished can only be regarded as fragmentary, and what the full 
effect will be when the design is completed can only at present be left to the 
imagination. 

The Library, however, is only the central source from which radiate the 
eccentric forces of a vast machine, and the complicated and splendidly regu- 
lated system applied to the management of the Boston Public Library is 
seldom realised to its full extent. 

The thirteen separate but interrelated Departments into which this great 
hive of industry is divided, and in which are elaborated the manifold and 
various activities which constitute the immense power and beneficent influences 
of the Central Library, have already been enumerated. Here the work is 
carried on in its minutest detail by a large and efficient staff of experts and 
their graded assistants, and yet all is wrought in perfect order, and with the 
utmost precision and efficiency. 

But the philanthropic and inestimable educational advantages derivable 
from the Central Library do not end here, for in the organization, manage- 
ment and development of twelve Branch Libraries amid the suburbs of the 
city, and scattered over the forty-three square miles of the city's territory, 
and in its cooperation with schools, its functions as a repository and dis- 
tributing centre for books and other agencies cannot be overestimated in 
importance. 

In all the Branches there is a custodian in charge with necessary assistants, 
and, in the majority of cases, a janitor. In each of the Reading Rooms, also, 
a Custodian is in charge of its work. The following official list gives the 
locations of the Branches and Reading Rooms : — 

LIBRARY SYSTEM, FEBRUARY 1, 1910. 

Departments. Opened. 

•Central Library, Copley Sq. Established May 2, 1854 Mar. 11, 1895 

JEast Boston Branch, 37 Meridian St Jan. 28, 1871 

§South Boston Branch, 372 Broadway May 1, 18/2 

||Roxbury Branch, 46 Millmont St July, 1873 

JCharlestown Branch, City Sq *Jan., 1874 



THE BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 17 

fBrighton Branch, Academy Hill Rd *Jan., 1874 

JDorchester Branch, Arcadia, cor. Adams St Jan. 25, 1874 

§South End Branch, 397 Shawmut Ave Aug., 1877 

§Jamaica Plain Branch, Jackson Hall (temporarily) Centre St Sept., 1877 

JWest Roxbury Branch, Centre, near Mt. Vernon St *Jan. 6, 1880 

fWest End Branch, Cambridge, cor. Lynde St Feb. 1, 1896 

JUpham's Corner Branch, Columbia Rd., cor. Bird St Mar. 16, 1896 

Station A. Lower Mills Reading Room, Washington St June 7, 1875 

" B. Roslindale Reading Room, Washington St., cor. 

Ashland St Dec. 3, 1878 

" D. Mattapan Reading Room, 727 Walk Hill St Dec. 27, 1881 

" E. Neponset Reading Room, 362 Neponset Ave Jan. 1, 1883 

" F. Mt. Bowdoin Reading Room, Washington, cor 

Eldon St Nov. 1, 1886 

" G. Allston Reading Room, 354 Cambridge St Mar. 11, 1889 

" J. Codman Square Reading Room, Washington, cor. 

Norfolk St Nov. 12, 1890 

" N. Mt. Pleasant Reading Room, Dudley, cor. Maga- 
zine St Apr. 29, 1892 

" P. Broadway Extension Reading Room, 13 Broadway 

Extension Jan. 16, 1896 

" R. Warren Street Reading Room, 390 Warren St May 1, 1896 

" S. Roxbury Crossing Reading Room, 1154 Tremont St. Jan. 18, 1897 
" T. Boylston Station Reading Room, The Lamartine, 

Depot Sq Nov. 1, 1897 

" W. Industrial School Reading Room, 39 North Bennet St. Nov. 3, 1899 

" Z. Orient Heights Reading Room, 1030 Bennington St. June 25, 1901 

" 22. North Street Reading Room, 207 North St June 9, 1903 

" 23. City Point Reading Room, 615 Broadway July 18, 1906 

" 24. Parker Hill Reading Room, 1518 Tremont St July 15, 1907 

The delivery or deposit of books is also undertaken in one hundred and 

twenty schools, twenty-nine institutions, and fifty-eight fire company houses. 

It will thus be seen that the chief aim in the management of the Library 

is to unify and consolidate the interests of the Central Library with the 

* As a branch. 

f In building owned by City, and exclusively devoted to library uses. 

j In City building, in part devoted to other municipal uses. 

§ Occupies rented rooms. 

|| The lessee of the Fellows Athenaeum, a private library association. 



18 THE MASSACHUSETTS MAGAZINE 

Branches and Reading Rooms; for, if they were conducted separately and 
independently of each other, they would not only be restricted in their pur- 
pose, but circumscribed in their philanthropic and educational activities. As the 
necessity for this cooperation has been justified by experience, the Trustees 
have judiciously recognised their responsibilities, and, from a sense of public 
duty, are promoting and increasing the facilities for supplying such books as 
may be applied for from the Central Library to the Branches and the Read* 
ing Rooms. 

The carrying out of this system necessitates the outlay of over $5,000 
per annum for the hire of transportation wagons, but the enlightened policy 
of the Trustees does not recognize false economy in the effort to serve the 
best interests of the community. 

The Library, as already stated, consists of 1,000,000 books in round num- 
bers, — actually 963,090 in 1909, 746,514 being in the Central Library, and 
216,576 in the various Branches and Reading Rooms. Nine of the largest 
Branches are said to average over 20,000 volumes in each. 

The Central Library also contains about 35,000 separate manuscripts, 
about 150 volumes of MS. books, over 200 Atlases (including a perfect copy 
of the rare Santarem's Atlas), about 10,000 maps, and nearly 30,000 photo- 
graphs, prints, engravings and other pictures. 

Each Branch has its own collection of photographs and pictures, varying 
in number from 1,000 to 2,000, — in all about 13,000. 

The catalogues of the Central Library comprise 3,436,490 separate cards, 
and the cases containing them would extend five-sixths of a mile. 

Nineteen different card-catalogues, containing 2,977,790 separate cards, 
are necessary for the working of the Central Library, and fifteen separate 
card-catalogues, containing 434,400 cards, are employed in working the col- 
lections in the different Branches and Reading Rooms. 

The shelves required for the books in the Central Library and Branches 
would extend a distance of about twenty miles.* 

As intimately associated with the gradual development of this gigantic 
Library system, the names of the past Librarians, who have immediately 
stimulated and secured its evolution, deserve a place here : — 

Capen, Edward, May 13, 1852, to December 16, 1874. 

Jewett, Charles C, 1858 to January 9, 1868. 

Winsor, Justin, LL.D., February 25, 1868, to September 30, 1877. 

* Benton: Opus cit. 



"'V.-< 



THE BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 19 

Green, Samuel A., M.D., LL.D., Trustee, Acting Librarian, October 1, 
1877, to September 30, 1878. 

Chamberlain, Mellen, LL.D., October 1, 1878, to September 30, 1890. 

Dwight, Theodore F., April 13, 1892, to April 30, 1894. 

Putnam, Herbert, LL.D., February 11, 1895, to April 30, 1899. 

Whitney, James L., Acting Librarian, March 31, 1899, to December 21, 
1899; Librarian, December 22, 1899, to January 31, 1903. 

If one reflects for a moment on the onerous and multitudinous duties 
devolving upon the Librarian, it will be readily admitted that the chief 
executive officer of such a large and complicated machine as the Boston 
Public Library, with its many ramifications, must be an exceptional man, — 
a man of extensive literary knowledge and accurate scholarship, while dis- 
tinguished for executive and administrative ability. That Horace G. Wadlin, 
Litt.D., the present Librarian, is the right man in the right place is attested 
not only by the phenomenal success of the Library during the seven years 
he has held the office, but by the general accord of those who utilise the 
privileges of the Library as habitual readers, who owe so much to his courtesy 
and ever-ready help, which he so genially dispenses. 

The citizens of Boston owe a deep debt of gratitude to the Trustees who, 
without remuneration of any kind, render their valuable services to the 
Institution, and who, in addition to having the general care and control of 
the Central Public Library, and also its Branches, hold all real and personal 
estate connected with them, and have the supervision and approval of all 
expenditures of the money appropriated for Library purposes. Five Trustees 
are appointed by the Mayor for terms of five years, and of these a committee 
of two visits the Library weekly. 

The Trustees at present in office are: — 

Josiah H. Benton, President. 
Thomas F. Boyle, Vice-President. 
Samuel Carr. William F. Kenney. Alexander Mann. 

The following statistics show the number of books in the Library, the 
number of card-holders, the number of employes, and the income and ex- 
penditure of the Library for the year ending February 1, 1910: — 

STATISTICS, FEBRUARY 1, 1910. 

Books in the Library: 

In the Central Library 752,182 



20 THE MASSACHUSETTS MAGAZINE 

In the branches and stations 209,340 

Total 961,522 

Number of card-holders having the right to draw books for home 

use (on Feb. 1, 1910) 86,104 

Number of books issued for home use 1,124,456 

Value of buildings and equipment, say $3,000,000 

Value of books, say $2,000,000 

Income, 1909: 

From the City of Boston $349,455.00 

From trust fund incomes 19,546. 10 

From other sources 1,496.76 

Total $370,497.86 

Expenditures, 1909: 

For books, periodicals, etc $42,979.52 

For all other purposes 314,809.51 

Total $357,789.03 

Books added, 1909 (net increase) 20,498 

Number of employes: 

Central Library, day service 197 

Central Library, evening and Sunday service 106 

Branches and stations 90 

Branches, Sunday service 61 

Total 454 

. The main object in the establishment of Public Free Libraries is to pro- 
vide instructive books, and all the other advantages of a well-organised Literary 
Institution for those who would otherwise be deprived of their use, and to 
thus foster a taste for reading in the pursuit and acquisition of knowledge. 
But, in addition to this, a well-equipped Public Library should offer facilities 
to students and scholars for study and research in every branch of Literature, 
Science, and Art, and in fact to form a great Encyclopaedic Bureau where, from 
the youngest to the oldest, — from the child just out of the Kindergarten to the 
Professor, — through all grades and varieties of special inquiry, — all may 
drink of the cup of knowledge and the w r ell of wisdom. 

That the Boston Public Library meets all these requirements goes with- 
out saying, for it is indeed an inexhaustible treasure-house of all that can 
instruct and dignify the human mind in knowledge, learning, and culture, and 



THE BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 21 

it is, moreover, capable of meeting every want and of supplying every demand 
within its realm. 

I cannot do better, in concluding this cursory sketch of the Boston Public 
Library and its resources, than quote the following passage from an admirable 
paper by Mr. Lindsay Swift, on " The Significance of the Library " : " With 
such an equipment, and in such surroundings, supported and revered by a 
community conspicuous for the high average culture of its citizens, facing 
a future full of the promise of new birth in arts and letters, the Public 
Library of the City of Boston has every reason to be sure of fulfilling its 
most confident hopes. What the present has been to those humble beginnings 
of half a century ago, so shall the end of the next fifty years see an institution 
so robust, so progressive, so powerful in influence, that its possibilities can be 
prefigured only in the mind of the veriest dreamer of to-day. Excess of 
confidence, not timorousness, is wanted to carry on great objects; the task 
rests lightly on a coming generation, born of those who made a nation safe 
after the perils of civil war. A belief in the coming greatness of Boston is 
just now needful, not to assign to it the respectful appellation of a second 
Edinburgh or the Athens of America, but to beautify it, to revere it, to make 
its politics and its inner life as wise and pure as its outward appearance is 
destined to be fair. In all this coming welfare the noble structure in Copley 
Square will receive and contribute its full share." 

The following statistics with regard to the Public Library, culled from 
official sources, afford much information while serving to economise space : — 

The Central Library building has cost, up to the present time, exclusive 
of the land on which it stands, $2,743,284.56. 

The conduct of its business involves the disbursement of over $30,000 
per month, or about $1,000 per day. 

There are about 200,000 volumes in the Central Library, on the shelves, 
where they can be taken down and consulted without cards. 

The aggregate amount of property employed in the Library work is 
not less than $8,000,000. 

From 35,000 to 45,000 volumes are added to the Library collections 
each year. 

In 1909, 1,647,846 books were issued for use outside of the Central and 
Branch Libraries. In this year also 31 f 088 were bound in the Library bindery; 
201,883 publications were folded, stitched, and trimmed; 800 portfolios of 
pictures, and 22,000 books were sent out to various schools, and 540 teachers 
were supplied with special collections. 



22 THE MASSACHUSETTS MAGAZINE 

Seven hundred and nine volumes were lent to other libraries in the 
State, and 252 to libraries out of Massachusetts. 

Thirty-two Lectures were given in the Lecture Hall, on fine arts, archi- 
tecture, printing, travel, etc. 

Between February 1, 1909, and January 27, 1910, cards in the hands 
of authenticated borrowers amounted to 86,104. 

* A comparison of the growth of the Library in decades shows: — 1853, 
16,221; 1863,116,934; 1873,260,550; 1883,438,504; 1893,507,152; 1903, 
848,884; at present, 961,522. 

The number of employes on the regular Library staff is 219, and to- 
gether with those employed in the Branches and stations, and on Sunday 
service amounts to 455. 

The land upon which the Central Library is built, which was given by 
the Commonwealth and the City of Boston, is now worth $800,000. 

The annual appropriation by the City of Boston for maintaining the 
Library approximates $350,000. 

The aggregate personal property of the Library represents about 
$3,000,000. 

The aggregate value of real estate belonging to the Library amounts to 
about $4,500,000. 

The Library holds, by gifts from various persons, trust funds amounting 
to nearly $350,000, invested in City securities, and the income, approximating 
$15,000 annually, is devoted to the purchase of books. The character of the 
books thus purchased is, in most cases, fixed by the terms of the gifts. 



i&a^A ' &£ ". . .^u. &jm 



f 





r 


L_.._ -' 




i> ^ ■' 


. . 1 
t 




■ ~ 



'..■-■' •' -•'.'- 



- 



I 



ETB.EO COFFIN HOUSE, NANTUCKET 



JETHRO COFFIN'S HOME, 

"THE OLDEST HOUSE" IN. NANTUCKET 

1686-1910 



By R. A. Douglas-Lithgow, M.D., LL.D. 



In the quaintly-delightful island of Nantucket, — so full of natural charms, 
so brimful with historical associations, — there are few objects of keener 
interest than the ancient house, built in 1686, as a wedding gift to a young 
pair, the bridegroom the grandson of one of the earliest white settlers, 
and the bride — "sweet sixteen" — a daughter of Captain John Gardner, also 
an early settler, and up to the time of his death, in 1706, Chief Justice of 
the island. 

What changes have taken place since, like a lonely sentinel, this primitive 
dwelling first raised its front on the North Shore, at the top of Sunset 
Hill! Two hundred and twenty-four years! Only 194 years after the 
discovery of the New World, only 84 years after the discovery of the island 
by Bartholomew Gosnold, only 66 years after the landing of the Pilgrims ! 
And there it has stood during the decay of empires, the thwarted ambitions 
of kings and emperors, and for nearly a century before the American 
Revolution had consecrated the United States as "the home of the brave, 
and the land of the free" ; and it still stands as proudly as ever, where it 
has marked the rise, the fall, and the reascension of "the little purple island," 
smiling amid its venerable associations, and the pride of all Nantucketers. 

We claim no stately architectural beauties for this antiquated Nantucket 
dwelling-house, for it was erected long before Colonial architecture had even 
reached the "old country" from which it was subsequently imported ; it was, 
indeed, but a mere cottage, as it stands to-day after 224 years, but the happy 
home of one of the pioneers of civilization on this vast continent. 



24 THE MASSACHUSETTS MAGAZINE 

When the marriage was determined it was arranged that Captain John 
Gardner should supply the land for the building, and, inasmuch as the pro- 
spective bridegroom's father "owned large acreage of forest at Exeter, X. H.," 
it was decided that he should supply the necessary lumber, and it was thus 
that, in one of his own vessels, it was conveyed for the framework of the 
house. 

It has been stated that when the house was built there were not more 
than thirty houses on the island. When all was prepared, Jethro Coffin and 
Mary Gardner were duly married in their own house. 

"The site selected was about 150 feet from the brow of the hill, as it 
stands at the present day. . . . The main building occupying a space of about 
eighteen feet by thirty-five."* 

The house consists of two storeys and an attic, and the southern aspect 
of the sloping roof was much shorter than that in the rear. When the 
house was built the northern roof came down to within a few feet of the 
ground, and it ran over a lean-to which extended along the rear of the house 
from one end to the other. It is not generally known, however, that, at one 
time the north-east corner of the roof was destroyed by fire, and when the 
damage was repaired, the angle was not restored, so that pictures of the 
house only represent the downward extension of the northern roof on the 
north-west end. The reason assigned for the greater extent of the northern 
roof is that, in most old Nantucket houses the short roof is on the southern 
exposure, and the long roof on that of the north because the prevailing winds 
are from the south-west, and in running up the south roof and running down 
the longer northern roof, the wind would not tend so much to tear off the 
shingles. Under the shingles the roof itself was originally covered with 
boards about eighteen inches broad running lengthwise up and down. 

Midway on the roof-ridge is one large brick chimney-stack, through 
which all the flues in the house are conducted. Of this chimney more anon. 

On the front, or southern, aspect of the house are the front door and 
two windows. W T hen the house was built there was an extensive wooden- 
porch erected in front of this door, and into this porch entered, on its eastern 
side, a massive door of oak which constituted the real hall-door of the house. 
The outer door was opened by passing a finger through a small hole in the 
door itself, and lifting a solid bar of oak, which effectually secured the door 
when it was shut. This useful as well as ornamental appendage is no longer 
remembered, having disappeared in the flux of time. It is stated by Mrs. 

♦"Trustrum and his Grandchildren." Mrs. Worron, 1881. 



JETHRO COFFIN'S HOME 25 

Worron, who resided in the house at an early period, that the space disclosed 
when this outer door was opened, ''was large enough to admit a yoke of oxen." 

On the east end of the house are three windows, one for each storey, 
and on the west end are four, one to light the living-room on the ground 
floor, and a small narrow one lighting the little bedroom north of the living- 
room, one for the second storey and one for the attic. The window supplying 
the living-room is somewhat remarkable inasmuch as the upper sash has two 
rows with five panes in each, and the lower sash has three rows with five 
panes in each. So far as is known there is no similar window on the island, 
and being in several ways more elaborate than any of the other windows, 
it may be assumed that it was of later origin than the house itself. 

The house is very substantially built of large oak beams averaging from 
12 to 14 inches in diameter, about a foot square, but none of these, even now, 
shows symptoms of decay. The main beams are strengthened on the second 
floor by means of "ship's knees" of oak bolted to the floor beams and 
uprights. Cedar laths have been nailed to the flooring above, by hand-made 
nails, and the plaster, freely used in covering them, w r as mainly composed of 
ground shells; and there are evidences of more modern lathing and plastering 
having been superimposed at a subsequent date. 

Entering the front door we find ourselves in a small vestibule out of 
which are two large rooms occupying nearly the whole of the ground floor, 
that on the east being known as the "keeping-room," and that on the west the 
living-room, and between, in front of the large chimney, is a winding stairway 
leading to the second storey. 

The keeping-room is a large room, but the ceiling is low, not more than 
6 J / 2 feet high. The superior workmanship of the house is apparent the 
moment one enters, in the heavy oak beams edging the ceiling, while one 
immense beam crosses the middle of the ceiling itself, and is flanked on 
cither side by six or eight supports of sturdy oak planking. 

In this room, as well as in the western or living-room, is a huge fireplace 
which, in its original condition monopolized more than half the length of the 
room, and in its depth could easily accommodate a whole family. The^ fireplace 
in this room has, however, been more recently contracted, part of it having 
been converted into a good-sized closet, and a smaller fire-grate installed^ 

Here, also, on the spacious mantelpiece, is a specimen of Colonial carving 
which is as dainty and elegant as is imaginable, and its delicacy and flawless- 
ness, after all the years that have flown since its construction, are really most 
remarkable. This mantel was placed in the keeping-room at the time of 
the contraction of the fireplace. 



26 THE MASSACHUSETTS MAGAZINE 

At the north end of the room is a small, narrow "back-entry" or closet, 
with a narrow back-door leading into the back yard, and at the sill of the 
door there is a large, flat doorstep of stone, well worn with time. 

The walls of the keeping-room are covered with the stern boards of ships 
(bearing their respective names), which have been wrecked in the neighbor- 
hood during the prosperous whaling industry, and are fraught with sad 
memories of other days. An imitation carpet, painted on the floor of this 
room, can even yet be discerned. 

As we cross the small vestibule between the two front rooms one notices 
a small window about 12 or 14 inches long, and 4 inches high, at the east 
side of the front door. This is known as the "Indian Peep-hole." It has 
not yet been fully determined why it was so placed, although from its situation 
it would have admirably served the purpose mentioned, for, as has been 
stated, "It is so high that while persons outside could not see in, those inside 
could see out." 

In the living-room on the west side of the house is, also, a magnificent 
fireplace in all its original amplitude, measuring seven feet four inches in 
length, and about five feet in depth. The back of the cavity is semi-circular 
instead of square as is usual, and it is perhaps as perfect a specimen of late 
17th century work as can be seen. 

These two lower rooms contain numerous relics — furniture, china, bric-a- 
brac and other objects of interest, which space, unfortunately, will not permit 
me to particularize. At the back of this room are some domestic offices, and 
a small bedroom. 

Up the gradually narrowing staircase we ascend to the second storey, 
where there are three rooms, but the western, or "Bridal chamber" is the 
only one that claims our interest. It is a large room, nearly square, with 
one western window, and an admirable open fireplace remaining exactly as it 
was originally constructed. This room contains the only original mantel in 
the house, and its peculiar design is suggestive of the keel of a ship. The 
room measures 18 feet long, the floor being covered with eleven boards, 
some 19 or 20 inches broad. 

In this room is a closet concerning which a very interesting story is 
told,* but space forbids its introduction here. The closet in question is still 
known as "The Indian Closet." This room also contains all that remains 
of the headstone erected over the grave of Captain John Gardner 175 years 
ago. It was the only one discernible in the old burying-ground, near Maxey's 

*Vide "Trustrum and his Grandchildren," Mrs. Worron, 1881. 



JETHRO COFFIN'S HOME 27 

Pond, where it reposed from 1706 to 1881, and in order to save it from the 
ravages of relic-hunters, it was removed to "The Oldest House" for preserva- 
tion, in 1883. The inscription is still decipherable. 

Another flight of stairs leads to the attic, which has never been finished, 
and is almost made into two rooms by the stairway and the chimney. From 
the scuttle in the roof, which is reached by a few rough steps, a splendid view 
is afforded of the island, including its beautiful moorlands, its fine harbor and 
its interesting buildings. 

A few words must here be devoted to the large chimney-stack projecting 
from the roof, which is remarkable not only for its size, but for its unique- 
ness, and there has been much difference of opinion as to the significance of 
its ornamentation. The chimney is built of bricks, said to have been brought 
from England in Nantucket vessels as ballast, and it has an ornamental cornice 
of several rows of bricks around the top. On its south aspect is a figure, 
wrought in brickwork, resembling an inverted U, which measures 2 x Z l / 2 
feet, within the bend of which is the monogram J. C, representing Jethro 
Coffin. So strongly has the idea dominated the minds of the people generally 
that this U-shaped figure was designed as a horse-shoe to propitiate good- 
luck, and to exorcise demons that the house itself is better known by the 
title of "The Horse Shoe House" than by any other, and especially so because, 
at the time the house was built, and for years previously "the dark shadow 
of witchcraft hung like a pall over the primitive homes and hamlets of Xew 
England";* although the terrible Salem witchcraft trials did not take place 
until some six years later. It is possible, however, that the figure was only 
intended as an ornament, but who can settle the question? 

Such in outline is the house erected 224 years ago as a wedding gift to 
Jethro and Mary Coffin, where "Little Peter" their child (named after his 
grandfather) was born, and where the "Bridal-chamber" remains almost 
exactly as they left it during the dawn of civilization on the island. When 
it was built (and it has been stated that Jethro himself was the principal 
artificer in its erection), it was considered one of the best houses in the 
neighborhood; and that its foundations were "well and truly laid" is proved 
by its having withstood the ravages of Time during more than two centuries, 
and in its still surviving, almost as hale as ever, amid the vicissitudes of its 
venerable antiquity. 

The house was sold by the Coffin family to Nathaniel Paddock in 1707, 
the year after Captain John Gardner's death. For many years afterwards it 

♦"The Oldest House on Nantucket Island," p. 54. 



28 THE MASSACHUSETTS MAGAZINE 

was abandoned as a dwelling-house, and had been utilized for the storage of 
hay. 

In 1881, at the time of a reunion of the Coffin family, commemorating the 
200th anniversary of the original Tristram Coffin's death, when the house was 
becoming dilapidated, it was rebought for preservation by Tristram Coffin of 
Poughkeepsie, N. Y., and his brother, who put on a new roof, repaired the 
top of the chimney, strengthened some of the supports, and partially re- 
shingled the exterior. Thus it remained until 1886, the anniversary of its 
building, when it was resolved to carefully and judiciously restore "The 
Oldest House," and this was thoroughly done, while preserving the original 
conditions with as little change as possible, and without destroying any of 
its ancient characteristics. 

It was during these repairs that the date of the erection of the house 
was discovered in the attic, "1686," in figures eight inches long, being painted 
on the side of the chimney. These were, unfortunately, destroyed in putting 
in an iron support to strengthen the chimney. 

After the house had been put into such repair as enabled the workmen 
to say "It was good for at least another hundred years," it was kept securely 
closed for eleven years, until, in 1897, the summer visitors to the island 
clamored so vigorously for its being opened to the public that, in June, 
1897, a curator was appointed, and it has remained open for inspection ever 
since, much to the gratification of the general public. 

An original portrait of Mary Coffin, in oil, for which she is said to 
have sat three times in Boston, is still in the possession of Mrs. Eunice Coffin 
Gardner Brooks of Nantucket — a lineal descendant of Mary Coffin — but 
although the portrait has been attributed erroneously to Copley, the artist 
remains unknown : the picture contains some of Copley's characteristics which 
would suggest the probability of its having been painted by some one of the 
great artist's teachers. 

At the east end of the house was the well which supplied it with water. 
The old-fashioned "sweep" is still in its position, and the curbing having been 
restored, and the mason-work put in sanitary repair, the water can be drawn 
to-day as pure and sparkling as when the sweet young face of the bride of 
■sixteen was reflected from its depths in 1686. 

It only remains to be said that the affable and courteous lady-custodian, 
Mrs. Anna Starbuck Jenks — a lineal descendant of one of the original Nan- 
tucket families and a poetess of more than local reputation— has genially 
fulfilled the duties of her office for twelve successive summers, with increas- 
ing enthusiasm and interest. 



[This is the tenth of a series of articles, giving the organization and history of all the 
Massachusetts regiments which took part in the war of the Revolution.] 

COL. RUGGLES WOODBRIDGE'S 

REGIMENT 



Colonel B. Rcggles Woodbridge's Minute Men's Regiment, 1775. 
Colonel B. Ruggles 25th Regiment, Army of the United Colonies, 1775. 



By Frank A. Gardner, M. D. 

The western counties of the state furnished a large proportion of the 
members of this regiment, six companies coming from Hampshire County, 
two from Berkshire, one including Hampshire and Worcester County men 
and one from Essex County. 

The regiment responded to the Lexington alarm call of April 19, 1775, 
under the following officers : 

" A Mufter roll of the Field & Staff Officers of the Regiment of Minute 
Men commanded by R. Woodbridge, Colo. 
Officers' names. Towns whence they came. Rank. Time of entering service. 



R. Woodbridge 
Caleb Clarke 
Wm. Stacey 
Richd. Montague 



South Hadley Colo. Apr. 20 

Belchertown Lt. Colo. Apr. 20 

New Salem Ma jr. Apr. 19 

Leverett Adjt. Apr. 20 

R. Woodbridge Colo." 
This regiment contained nine companies with the following officers : 



Captains. 
Joseph Hooker 
David Cowden 
Moses Montague 
Joseph Foster 
John Cowls 
Noahdiah Leonard 
Ebenezer Goodall 
Reuben Dickenson 
Thomas W. Foster 



1st Lieutenant. 
Isaac Gray 



William Gilmer 
Ashael Smith 
Josiah Smith 
Josiah Osgood 
Zaccheus Crocker 



2nd Lieutenant. 
Josiah Willson 
Ens. James Taylor 



Eleazer Warner 
Danl Whitmore 

Joseph Dickinson 
James Hendrick." 



A roll dated April 25, 1775, of the last named company, calls it a " Trane 
of Artelery in Coll Ruggles Woodbridge's Regiment. ,, 



30 



THE MASSACHUSETTS MAGAZINE 



The regiment was reorganized the last of April and became the 22nd 
Provincial Regiment. 

" A Return of Colo Ruggles Woodbridge's Regt 









Cambridge, 


June 


14, A. D. 1775. 


Captains' Names. 


No 


t. of men. 


No. of effective arms. 


Places where stationed, 


Capt. Dickinfon 




60 


47 




In Colledge 


Capt. Cowden 




31 


25 




Colledge 


Capt. Dexter 




44 


36 




Leechmere's Point 


Capt. N. Leonard 




54 


52 




Cambridge 


Capt. S. Pearl 




36* 


26 




Cambridge 


Capt. Wm. Meacham 


45 


45 




Colledge 


Capt. John Cowle 




35 
305 


35 
266 




Colledge 






7 


7 




- 






312 


273 










42 









354 



Richd Montague Adjt 

Colo Woodbridge's Regt." 



" Cambridge Camp June 16, 1775. 
A Return of the Officers Names in Collo Woodbridge's Regiment 



Captains. 


Lieuts. 


Ensigns. 


No. 


of Men. 


Reuben Dickenson 


Zaccheus Crocker 


Daniel Shay 




60 


Noahdiah Leonard 


Josiah Smith 


Samuel Gould 




54 


Stephen Pearl 


Aaron Rowley 


Abner Pease 




43 


David Cowden 








30 


John Cowls 








35 


Ichabod Dexter 


Ithamar Goodenough 


John Mayo 




52 


John King 








39 


Seth Murray 








50 
363 


Abijah 


Brown Lieut Collo 


William Stacy Major 


*/7 on ye road." 











COLONEL RUGGLES WOODBRIDGE'S REGIMENT 31 

In Committee of Safety, Cambridge 

June 21, 1775. 
Collo Woodbridge having satisfied this Committee that the above eight 
Companies are in good forwardness It is recommended to the Honble Congref s, 
that said Regiment be Commifsioned accordingly. 

Benjamin White, Chairman." 
A company commanded by Captain Eleazer Lindsey, with Lieutenant 
Daniel Galeucia, appears to be credited to this regiment and also to the regi- 
ment commanded by Colonel Samuel Gerrish at the same time. The follow- 
ing records have been brought together by the author in an effort to determine 
the facts. 

" A Muster-Roll of the Company under the Command of Lieu. Daniel 
Galusha in Colonel Woodbridge's Regiment to the first of Aug., 1775. 

Time of Inlist. Time of Serv. 
Capt. Eleazer Lindfea Lynn May 12 Days 81 

Lieut. Daniel Gallufhee . Lynn May 12 Days 81 

Lieut. Jacob Ramsdell Lynn May 12 Days 81 

May 16, 1775, Lieutenant Daniel " Gallusha " received a month advance 
pay at Cambridge for enlisting in the eight months' service in Captain " E. 
Lindsea's Co., Col. Woodbridge's Reg't " (Muster Rolls in the Archives 
v. 35, p. 133.) 

The company under the first two named officers is credited to Colonel 
Gerrish's Regiment in a return dated July 21, 1775. (Archives 59, p. 334.) 
At this time the company was stationed at Winnissemet and upon a report 
being made by Adjutant Christian Febiger of Colonel Gerrish's Regiment 
that the guard at Maiden was insufficient, the company w T as transferred to 
that place. 

In a return dated August 3, 1775, Captain Lindsey's Company is called 
"of Colonel Gerrish's Regiment." (Archives v. 35, p. 137.) 

Lieutenant Benjamin Crafts in his journal made the following entry: 
"Sunday, August 6, (1775) .... just after the meeting the floating 
batteries came up Mystic River and fired several shots on Maiden side, and 
which burnt to ashes. One Capt. Lindsly, who was stationed there, fled with 
landed a number of regulars, which set fire to a houst near Penny ferry 
his company, and got before the women and children in his flight." (Essex 
Institute Hist. Col. v. Ill, p. 56.) 

"On the 13th (Aug., 1775) two barges and two sail-boats, on their way 
to the floating battery in Mystic River, bearing near Maiden Point, Captain 
Lindsey's Company opened a smart fire upon them, which obliged them to 
return." 



32 ' THE MASSACHUSETTS MAGAZINE 

Captain Lindsey " of Colonel Gerrish's Regiment " was courtmartialed 
and dismissed August 16, 1775. In Colonel Henshaw's Orderly Book under 
date of August 28, 1775, we read the following: 

" The company late under the command of Captain Ebenezer Lindsey 
is to join Colonel Woodbridge's regiment, as that regiment has at present 
only nine companys." 

Lieutenant Galeucia was then promoted to the command as the follow- 
ing return will show: 

" A Return of Tenth Company in the 25th Regiment of foot commanded 
by Ruggles Woodbridge Esq. 

Daniel Gallusha, Capt. Lynn. 

Daniel Pillfbury, Lieut. Newbury. 

Jacob Ram f dell, Enfn, Lynn." 

Archives 56-2-163. 

We know that the company remained in Colonel Woodbridge's Regiment 
during the rest of the year as an order for a bounty coat dated Maiden, 
December 22, 1775, was given to Lieutenant Pilsbury "of Capt. Daniel Gal- 
lusha's Company, Col. Ruggles Woodbridge's Regiment." 

This contradiction in the records may be explained in two ways ; first, 
the company may have been in each of these regiments for a portion of the 
time before August 1, 1775, or second the several documents may have 
been made out after the company became a part of Colonel Woodbridge's 
Regiment, and written as they were, in order to show that the officers saw 
continuous service from the month of May, the early part of said service 
being in Colonel Gerrish's Regiment and that from the middle of September 
on in Colonel Woodbridge's Regiment. The latter explanation seems the 
more probable. 

An order was given June 21, 1775, that half of the regiment be drafted 
every day to work with men from other regiments on Prospect Hill. 

This regiment was one of those to go onto the field on the 17th of June 
at Charlestown, just before the battle. Colonel Swett places the number of 
men from this regiment thus engaged as " three hundred strong." In Force's 
American Archives 4-11-1628 it is stated that five men of the regiment were 
wounded. 

The following list shows the towns which furnished most of the men 
in the regiment: 

Captains. Towns. * 

Ichabod Dexter, Athol, Warwick, Guilford, Northfield. 
Daniel Galusha, Lynn, Danvers, Salem, Marblehead, Newbury. 
David Cowden, Pelham, Conway, Middleboro, Ashfield, &c. 



COLONEL RUGGLES W00D3RIDGE'S REGIMENT 33 

Reuben Dickinson, Shutesbury, Leverett, Amherst, Hatfield, &c. 

Seth Murray, Charlestown, Hatfield, Hadley, Conway, Williamsburg, &c. 

Stephen Pearl, New Canaan, Lenox, Richmond, Albany, &c. 

John Cowles, Belchertown, Spencer, Brookfield, Granby, &c. 

Xoahdiah Leonard, Sunderland, South Hadley, Amherst, &c. 

John King, New Salem, Erving, &c. 

Asa Barns', Lanesboro, New Ashford, Jericho, New Providence, Gageboro, &c." 

The following entry appears in the records of the Committee of Safety, 
July 1,1775: 

" Fifteen small arms were delivered Col. Ruggles Woodbridge for the 
use of his regiment, amounting as by appraisement, to twenty-nine pounds, 
sixteen shillings and eight pence, for which guns a receipt was taken in the 
minute-book." 

When the Army of the United Colonies was formed in July, 1775, this 
regiment became the 25th. 

" A Muster roll of the Field & Staff officers of the 25th Regt of Foot 
Commanded by R. Woodbridge, Colonel. 



Name. 


Town. 


Rank. 


Time of Eng, 


R. Woodbridge 


S. Hadley 


Coll. 


April 27 


Abijah Brown 


Waltham 


L. Coll. 


June 17 


Willm Stacy 


N. Salem 


Major 


Apr 27 


Richd Montague 


Leverett 


Adjt 


*( n 


Gideon Hammond 


Belchertown 


Q. Mr 


May 7 


John Homans 


Boston 


Surgeon 


July 9 


Xehemiah Hinds 


Greenwich 


Mate 


April 27 " 



" In Committee of Safety July 3d 1775 Cambridge. 

It is recommended to the Honble the Provincial Congrefs that Asa Barns 
be Commifsioned as a Captain in Collo Woodbridge's Regiment, Caleb Smith 
as 1st Lieutenant in said Compy & Timothy Reed as 2d Lieut — also William 
Smith as 3d Lieut & Oliver Hagget as 2d Lieut in Capt King's Compy of 
said Woodbridge's Regiment. 

Accepted & Commissioned William Cooper, Secy." 

Captain Leonard of this regiment was ordered to join the guard at 
Watertown, July 6, 1775. Captain Pearl was tried by court martial August 
22nd and acquitted. His complainant, Daniel Davids, was ordered confined. 

September 30, 1775, this regiment was stationed " at west side of Prospect 



34 THE MASSACHUSETTS MAGAZINE 

Hill on the road leading from Charlestown River to Monotomy." On that 
date a court of inquiry regarding the regiment was to sit. 

Frothingham in his " Siege of Boston," states that " On the 9th of Novem- 
ber, Lieutenant-Colonel Clark, at the head of six companies of light infantry 
and a hundred grenadiers — about four hundred men, — embarked in boats 
from Boston and landed at Lechmere's Point, to carry off the stock there. It 
was at high water, when the place was an island. The Cerebus and several 
floating batteries covered the party. The alarm was given. Colonel Thompson, 
with his regiment of riflemen, joined by Colonel Woodbridge, with a part of 
his regiment and a part of Patterson's regiment, marched down to meet the 
enemy. To get on to the point, the troops were obliged to ford the causeway 
in the face of the British, when the water was several feet deep. This they 
did with much spirit. The enemy, however, were about to embark under cover 
of the fire of the British man-of-war, of a floating battery and the fire of a 
battery on Charlestown Neck. They lost two men, and carried off ten cows. 
The Americans had two men dangerously wounded by grape-shot from the 
ship. Some of the troops behaved with great spirit." 

A company, under command of the following officers, joined the regi- 
ment about the middle of December and served until January 1, 1776: 

Captain Elijah Dwight of Belchertown. 

First Lieutenant Joseph Hooker, of Greenwich. 

Second Lieutenant John Thomson, of Pelham. 

The strength of the regiment each month through the year was as follows : 



Date. 


Com. Off. 


Staff. 


Non. Corns. 


Rank & File. 


Total 


June 9, 


17 


— 


42 


342 


401 


July- 


17 


5 


36 


366 


424 


Aug. 18, 


22 


5 


38 


261 


326 


Sept. 23, 


28 


4 


58 


458 


548 


Oct. 17, 


27 


4 


37 


398 


466 


Nov. 18, 


25 


4 


38 


405 


472 


Dec. 30, 


24 


4 


40 


438 


506 



COLONEL BENJAMIN RUGGLES WOODBRIDGE of South Had- 
ley, was the son of Reverend John and Tryphena (Ruggles) Woodbridge. He 
was born October 16, 1733, and was named for his maternal grandfather. 
Reverend Benjamin Ruggles. He was a private in Captain Samuel Smith's 
Company which marched from South Hadley, August 9, 1757. The roll 
showing this service was dated Hadley, December 1, 1758. He was a phy- 



COLONEL RUGGLES WOODBRIDGE'S REGIMENT 35 

sician in practice in Hadley in 1765, but the author of the " History of 
Hadley " states that he seems not to have continued to practice many years. 
He had a large house in South Hadley on the lot formerly used by Reverend 
Mr. Rawson. In 1771 he had a place in South Hadley where he made potash 
and in 1773 retailed spirits. He took an active interest in the cause of liberty 
and was appointed with seven other colonels to look up the claims of several 
gentlemen to the rank of colonel. This committee appointment was made in 
the Third Provincial Congress. He commanded a regiment of minute-men 
and led them upon the receipt of the news of the Lexington alarm of April 
19th. April 27th he was engaged as Colonel of his reorganized regiment, which 
then became the 22nd Regiment in the Provincial Army. This was changed 
again to the 25th Regiment, Army of the United Colonies, in July, 1775, and 
he served through the year as commander. February 8th, 1776, he was com- 
missioned Lieutenant-Colonel in Colonel Samuel Howe's 4th Hampshire 
County Regiment. He w r as commissioned, June 16, 1776, Colonel of a regi- 
ment to be raised for Quebec service. In January and February, 1777, he 
was Muster Master for the Continental Army in Hampshire County. He 
was commissioned Lieutenant-Colonel of Colonel Elisha Porter's 4th Hamp- 
shire County Regiment, July 1, 1777, and served as Colonel of the regiment 
from August 17 to November 29, 1777, including in this time, service on the 
Bennington alarm. He was Muster Master for Hampshire County from 1778 
until February, 1781, at least. During 1778 he was also called Colonel of a 
Hampshire County Regiment. He offered the town of Hadley a bell, and 
a steeple with belfry was built for it in May, 1791. 

LIEUTENANT-COLONEL CALEB CLARK (CLARKE) was born 
about 1723. He removed from Northampton to Belchertown. He was a 
sentinel in Captain Nathaniel Dwight's Company, Colonel Israel Williams's 
Hampshire County Regiment, March 16, 1759. He served as Lieutenant- 
Colonel of Colonel Woodbridge's Regiment, on the Lexington alarm of April 
19, 1775, and continued under the same commander in the Provincial Army 
through May and June, 1775. He was probably the man of that name who 
was Captain of the 2nd Belchertown Company in Colonel Samuel How's 4th 
Hampshire County Regiment, his commission bearing date of April 1, 1776. 
He died at Belchertown in 1792, aged 69 years. 

LIEUTENANT-COLONEL ABIJAH BROWN of Waltham, was the 
son of Jonathan and Elizabeth (Simonds) Brown. He was born November 
27, 1736. He was a private in Captain Timothy Houghton's Company, Colonel 



36 THE MASSACHUSETTS MAGAZINE 

Jonathan Bagley's Regiment on the Crown Point expedition from March 24 
to October 11, 1756. He was at Fort William Henry August 9 of that year. 
A note states that he joined the above regiment from Colonel Brattle's Regi- 
ment. In June, 1771, he was a captain in Colonel William Brattle's Regiment. 
April 19, 1775, he marched on the Lexington alarm as First Major of Colonel 
Thomas Gardner's Regiment. June 17 he was engaged as Lieutenant-Colonel 
of Colonel B. Ruggles Woodbridge's Regiment and served through the year. 
June 26, 1776, he was commissioned Lieutenant-Colonel of Colonel Ephraim 
Wheelock's 4th Suffolk County Regiment. In a return dated September 11, 
1776, he was reported " sick and absent." A note in Colonel Wheelock's 
orderly book, dated Ticonderoga, November 26, 1776, stated that Brown was 
to take command. From May 5, 1778, to October 20, 1778, he was Lieutenant- 
Colonel of Colonel Thomas Poor's Regiment. The following reference to 
him is found in " Brown Associates," pp. 52-3 : 

" For many years he held the most important and responsible trusts in 
Waltham. He was often Moderator of town meetings and Selectman; was 
one of the committee, appointed March 1, 1773, to draft a reply to a letter 
from Boston respecting the grievances of the Colonies, and of Massachusetts 
in particular; also, one of the committee, appointed September 30, 1774, for 
drafting instructions to their Representative, requesting the Representatives 
of the several towns to form a Provincial Congress ; also one of the committee 
for maintaining correspondence with other towns. His name does not appear 
among the town officers from 1774 to 1778, during which time he was engaged 
in the military service of the country. He was a Lieutenant in 1769; a Cap- 
tain in 1773; was one of the first to ascertain the proposed march of the 
British upon Concord, and was active in giving the alarm. He was in the 
battle of Bunker Hill; was a Deputy Commissary in 1775, and in 1778 was 
Lieutenant-Colonel under Colonel Poor." He died at Lincoln, May 25, (28) 
1818. 

MAJOR WILLIAM STACEY of New Salem, was born in Salem and 
engaged in seafaring business, but removed to New Salem, Hampshire County, 
and became a farmer. In the biographical sketch of him given in the 
" Memorials of the Massachusetts Society of the Cincinnati " it is stated that 
he was Lieutenant of a company upon the Lexington alarm, and that the 
Captain of the company, " who was tinctured with Toryism, manifested back- 
wardness and indecision," was displaced in a sensational manner by the 
" gallant Stacy," who " was unanimously chosen captain and led a small but 



COLONEL RUGGLES WOODBRIDGE'S REGIMENT 37 

resolute band to Cambridge." The facts are that William Stacev marched as 
Major of Colonel Woodbridge's Regiment on the Lexington alarm of April 
19, 1775; that no company is credited to him as commander in the very full 
and complete returns of the companies of that period in the archives, and 
lastly, that the only company credited to the town of New Salem at this date 
was one commanded by Captain Ebenezer Goodale, who marched with his men 
in Colonel Woodbridge's Regiment. April 27 he was engaged as Major of 
Colonel W r oodbridge's Regiment in the Provincial Army, and he served under 
the same commander through the year. June 26, 1776, he was commissioned 
Major of Colonel Woodbridge's Regiment of Hampshire County men to 
serve at New York and Quebec. January 1, 1777, he became Lieutenant- 
Colonel of Colonel Ichabod Alden's 7th Regiment, Massachusetts Line, and 
served in it until he was transferred to Colonel William Shepard's 4th Regi- 
ment, Massachusetts Line, September 29, 1778. Francis S. Drake, in the 
above mentioned volume of the Massachusetts Society of the Cincinnati, states 
that he was, on the " 11th Nov. 1778, surprised and captured at Cherry Valley, 
N. Y., by a large force of Indians and Tories under Cols. Butler and Brant, 
and only escaped torture at the stake, to which he had been tied, by making 
the freemason's sign, which was recognized by the latter. He remained a 
prisoner over four years, when he was exchanged and returned home. In 
1789 he moved with his family to Ohio, and settled at Marietta. Two of his 
sons, John and Philemon, joined in the settlement in Big Bottom, which was 
surprised by the Indians, 2 Jan. 1791. John was killed; while Philemon, a 
lad of sixteen years, was taken prisoner and died in captivity. Col. Stacy, 
who was greatly esteemed for his many excellent qualities, d. Marietta, 1804." 

ADJUTANT RICHARD MONTAGUE of Leverett was the son of 
Captain Samuel and Elizabeth (White) Montague and a descendant in the 
fourth generation of Richard 1 Montague (Samuel 3 , John 2 , Richard 1 ). He 
was born May 7, 1729, in Hatfield, and in 1756 was a weaver residing in 
Sunderland. July 26 of the last named year he was Clerk in Lieutenant- 
Colonel Williams's Company, having joined that company from Captain Field's 
Company, in Colonel Williams's Regiment at Camp Fort Edward. From 
April 25 to December 5, 1759, he was a Sergeant in Captain Elijah Smith's 
Company. About 1765 he removed to that part of Sunderland which is now 
North Leverett, where he was chiefly instrumental in founding the Baptist 
church in that place. The church often met at his house and the first minister 
was ordained in his barn; whenever without a preacher he would act as 



38 THE MASSACHUSETTS MAGAZINE 

exhorter. Tradition states that upon the news of Lexington he said to his 
wife if God would forgive him for having fought seven years for the king 
he would fight for the rest of his days against him or until he was conquered. 
He marched in response to the Lexington alarm, as Adjutant of Colonel 
Woodbridge's Minute Men's Regiment, and April 27, 1775, was engaged to 
hold the same rank under that commander in the Provincial Army. Smith 
in his history of Sunderland refers to him as follows : " He was said to have 
been a member of General Washington's staff with the rank of Major. He 
was often sent to Western Massachusetts as a recruiting officer, and on these 
occasions the people noted ' his fine martial bearing, how well he managed 
his men, and how elegantly he rode his horse.' He died February 21, 1794. 
Reverend Baxter Newton, writing eighty years after his death, said that even 
then the name of Major Richard Montague was a household word in every 
ancient Baptist family." 

SURGEON SILAS BALL of Leverett was the son of Thomas and 
Hannah (Wright) Ball of Framingham, afterwards of North Brookfield. He 
studied medicine in Tewksbury with Dr. Kittredge. He enlisted as a private 
in Captain Reuben Dickenson's Company, Colonel Woodbridge's Regiment, 
and marched on the Lexington alarm, April 19, 1775. He did duty as Sur- 
geon's Mate, as the following documents will prove. 

" Petition of Silas Ball, setting forth that he acted in the capacity of a 
Surgeon, in Colonel Benjamin Ruggles Woodbridge's Esq. Regiment, by an 
invitation from Mr. Richard Montague, who was then Major of said regi- 
ment, which offer he heartily accepted of, and did the duty of a Surgeon, &c. 
from the 19th of April, to the 9th of July last, which is eleven weeks and three 
days. For certain reasons was not examined, so not appointed as a Surgeon 
in the regiment aforementioned, which regiment he supplied with medicines 
&c, to the amount of three pounds; your petitioner prays your Honours 
would make him a proper recompense therefor." 

" In the House of Representatives : Resolved, That there be paid out of 
the Treasury of this Colony, to Doctor Silas Ball, the sum of fourteen Pounds 
eight Shillings, in full of his services as Surgeon's Mate, from the 19th of 
April to the 9th of July ; and in full for Medicines used at his cost, for the 
use of the Army." 

He served through the year in the company in which he enlisted. June 
22, 1777, he was Surgeon of Colonel Seth Murray's Regiment. July 4, 1780, 
he was engaged as Surgeon's Mate in Colonel Seth Murray's 2nd Hampshire 



COLONEL RUGGLES WOODBRIDGE'S REGIMENT 39 

County Regiment and served until October 31, 1780. He was a successful 
physician, and after the war practiced medicine in Leverett. 

SURGEON JOHN HOMANS of Boston, was the son of Captain John 
and Elizabeth (Alden) Homans. He was born in Dorchester, April 8, 1753. 
He attended the Boston Latin School and entered Harvard College from 
which he graduated in 1772. He studied medicine with Doctor Joseph 
Gardner of Boston and assisted Doctor Holbrook of Dorchester and others 
in dressing wounds after the battle of Bunker Hill. July 9, 1775, he was 
engaged as Surgeon of Colonel Woodbridge's 25th Regiment, Army of the 
United Colonies and served through the year. In the " Historical Register 
of the Officers of the Continental Army," the statement is made that he 
served as Surgeon of the 2nd Regiment in the Continental Army under 
Colonels Learned and Shepard from January 1, to December 31, 1776, but 
in the lists of officers of the Continental Regiments made up January 1, of 
that year at the time of their organization his name appears as Surgeon of 
Colonel Paul D. Sargent's 16th Regiment of the Continental Army. Decem- 
ber 16, 1776, he was engaged as Surgeon of Colonel Elisha Sheldon's 2nd 
Continental Regiment of Light Dragoons. He served in that organization 
until August 4, 1781, when he resigned. He w r as with the army at Harlem 
and White Plains and in the battles preceding Burgoyne's surrender. Later 
he served on the Hudson. He returned to Boston after the war and prac- 
ticed medicine. His health gave out and he set sail for Europe in June, 
1800, and died on the third day out. He was a member of the ^Massachu- 
setts Society of the Cincinnati. j 

SURGEON'S MATE NEHEMIAH HINDS of Greenwich. His name 
appears with that rank in the list of officers of Colonel Woodbridge's Regi- 
ment of Minute Men, April 20, 1775, and he is credited with seven days' 
service. This however has been crossed out. He was engaged April 27, 
1775, to serve in that rank in the same regiment in the Provincial Army, and 
he continued to serve under Colonel Woodbridge at least as late as August 
1st and probably through the year. His name is in a list of Surgeons and 
Surgeon Mates, examined and approved at Watertown, July 12, 1775. 
December 11, 1775, he petitioned for pay as Chief Surgeon, claiming that 
he served in that capacity from April 19 to July 20, 1775. 

QUARTERMASTER GIDEON HAMMOND of Belchertown was en- 
gaged to serve in that rank in this regiment, May 7, 1775. No further record 
of service has been found of a man of that name in that section of the state. 



40 THE MASSACHUSETTS MAGAZINE 

CAPTAIN ASA BARNS of Lanesborough marched April 22, 1775, 
in response to the Lexington alarm, in command of a company in Colonel 
Paterson's Regiment. April 29, 1775, he enlisted in Colonel Benjamin Ruggles 
Woodbridge's Regiment, and commanded a company in that organization 
through the year. He was commissioned October 8, 1779, Captain in Colonel 
Benjamin Symonds's 2nd Berkshire County Regiment. From October 15 to 
November 21, 1779, he commanded the 1st Company in Colonel Israel Chapin's 
3d Regiment. His name also appears on a pay roll for services " at the North- 
ward/' from October 4 to 21, and 28 for the ten days following, 1780. June 
IS, 1785, he was paid for service as Colonel from October to November, 1781. 

' CAPTAIN DAVID COWDEN of Pelham was a Sergeant in Captain 
Nathaniel Dwight's Company, on a Crown Point expedition, from September 
15 to November 17, 1755. He also held the same rank in Captain Lothridge's 
Company, Colonel Israel Williams' Regiment, on the alarm for the relief of 
Fort William Henry, August, 1757, and while in this service travelled " 200 
miles in lA- l /> days." From May 2 to November 6, 1758, he was a sentinel 
in Captain Selah Barnard's Company, Colonel Williams' Regiment. From 
April 2 to December 15, 1759, he was sentinel in Captain John Burke's 
Company, Colonel Israel Williams' Regiment. He held many offices in 
Pelham, including that of road surveyor in 1751, assessor in 1752 and 1762, 
and selectman in 1761 and 1768-9. He was chosen a member of the Com- 
mittee of Correspondence in 1773. He commanded a company of Minute 
Men in Colonel W r oodbridge's Regiment in response to the Lexington alarm, 
.and May 1, 1775, was engaged in the same rank and under the same com- 
mander in the Provincial Army. He served through the year. His company 
-roll has been published in full in Putnam's Historical Magazine, v. I, pp. 89-90. 
He was a Captain in Lieutenant-Colonel B. Ruggles Woodbridge's 4th Hamp- 
shire County Regiment, in August, 1777, and served at Bennington. April 
18, 1781, he gave a receipt for £78:08:00, for serving in the "Continental 
"Service for three years." 

. CAPTAIN JOHN COWLS of Belchertown was the son of John Cowls 
and was born in Hatfield about 1731. A return sworn to March, 1758, showed 
that he was a sentinel in Captain Nathaniel Dwight's Company, Colonel Israel 
William's Regiment. He was Captain of a Company of Minute Men in 
Colonel Woodbridge's Regiment, which marched April 20, 1775, in response 
to the Lexington alarm. May 1: 1775, he was engaged to serve as Captain 
in Colonel Woodbridge's Regiment in the Provincial Army, and he served 



COLONEL RUGGLES WOODBRIDGE'S REGIMENT 41 

under that commander as late as September, 1775, and probably through the 
year. The roll of the Minute Men's Company has been published in full in 
Putnam's Historical Magazine, v. I, p. 89. 

CAPTAIN ICHABOD DEXTER of Athol was the son of Samuel and 
Mary (Clarke) Dexter. He was born in Athol, June 24, 1717, and learned 
the blacksmith's trade. He was a private in Colonel Ruggles's Regiment in 
the Crown Point expedition in 1755 and Ensign in Captain John Haven's 
Company, Colonel John Murray's 3d Worcester County Regiment, in June, 
1771. It is stated in the " Dexter Family Genealogy " that he was according 
to tradition " at the taking of old Fort Ticonderoga, when all the men in line 
on both sides of him were shot down, and his clothes were riddled with 
bullets, but none happened to draw blood. He and his brother Samuel were 
taken prisoners by the Indians at one time, who started with them for Canada, 
but as they camped one night the brothers awoke and finding their captors all 
asleep, they sent the whole company to the ' happy hunting grounds ' and started 
through the wilderness for home. They found it almost impossible to travel 
through the woods or to obtain food, and were obliged to kill and eat a dog 
which was with them. They finally reached home, but thoroughly used up 
and half starved. In the Revolution he served first as Captain of a Company 
of Minute Men in Colonel Doolittle's Regiment, on the Lexington alarm of 
April 19, 1775. He was engaged as Captain in Colonel Woodbridge's Regi- 
ment, April 24, 1775, and served through the year. Further facts concerning 
him have been given in the Massachusetts Magazine, v. II, p. 21. In 
addition to his farm in Hardwick, he owned one in Orange, called the Battle 
Farm. He was an active promoter of Shay's rebellion in 1786-7, but after- 
wards made his peace with the government. He was a man of ability and 
courage. He died of apoplexy, February 13, 1797. 

CAPTAIN REUBEN DICKINSON of Amherst was the son of Ebenezer 
and Sarah (Kellogg) Dickinson. He was a Sergeant in Captain Moses Porter's 
Company, from April 16 to December 10, 1755, on the Crown Point expedition. 
January 26, 1774, he was chosen a member of a committee to send a letter 
from Amherst to the Committee of Correspondence at Boston. He was 
Captain of a company of Minute Men in Colonel Woodbridge's Regiment, 
which marched in response to the Lexington alarm of April 19, 1775. May 1 
he was engaged to serve under the same commander in the Provincial Army 
and he continued with him through the year. This company did not fight 
in the entrenchments at Bunker Hill. John Dickinson, a member of the 



42 THE MASSACHUSETTS MAGAZINE 

company, told Judd, the historian, that one-half the company was ordered out 
in the morning but did not go. April 1, 1776, he was commissioned Captain 
in Colonel Samuel Howe's 4th Hampshire County Regiment. Later in that 
year he held the same rank in Colonel Woodbridge's Regiment in the expedition 
to Ticonderoga. From September 1 to October 24, 1777, he was a Captain 
in Colonel Elisha Porter's 4th Hampshire County Regiment. He was com- 
missioned again to serve in the same rank in that regiment, June 29, 1780. 
He commanded an insurgent force of three hundred men at Hatfield, but 
took the oath of allegiance in July, 1787, after Shay's rebellion. He was a 
Selectman in Amherst in 1772-5, 1777 and 1778. After the Revolution he 
removed to Thetford, Vermont. He died in Amherst, November 12, 1803, 
while on a visit to that place. 

CAPTAIN ELIJAH D WIGHT of Belchertown was the son of Captain 
Nathaniel Dwight of Belchertown, who commanded a company which marched 
to the relief of Fort William Henry in 1757. Elijah Dwight was Commissary 
to the hospital in Colonel Joseph Dwight's Regiment on the Crown Point 
expedition from February 18 to November 30, 1756. He was Captain of 
the Great Barrington Company, in Colonel William Williams's Regiment in 
January, 1764. In July, 1771, he was Lieutenant-Colonel of Colonel John 
Ashley's South Berkshire County Regiment. He probably was the man of 
that name and town who served as a private in Captain John Cowls's Com- 
pany of Minute Men in Colonel Woodbridge's Regiment in response to the 
Lexington alarm of April 19, 1775. He w r as Captain of a company in Colonel 
Woodbridge's Regiment from the middle of December, 1775, to the end of 
the year. He was commissioned February 13, 1776, Captain in Colonel Samuel 
Howe's 4th Hampshire County Regiment, of which B. R. Woodbridge was 
Lieutenant-Colonel.' June 4, 1776, he was commissioned Adjutant of that 
regiment, and August 9 of that year he was commissioned Captain of the 
9th Company of the Regiment. In August, 1777, he was a Captain in the 
same regiment under Colonel Elisha Porter, and again from July 20 to August 
25, 1779. He was chosen deacon of the church in 1793. He gave three acres 
of land for the church and common in front of it at Belchertown. The church 
records call him " public spirited and a benefactor to the town." 

(To be continued.) 



jpcpartoraf of fli^miriranSffiolutinn 



Frank A~Gar_dner/M. IXE.di 



State Ship Tartar. 

In the early months of 1780 the British 
naval forces were particularly active in 
Massachusetts Bay and as a result the 
state authorities resolved to increase the 
number of vessels in commission. They 
decided that it was expedient to obtain a 
new ship among the vessels thus authorized 
and planned to obtain as good a model as 
possible, as the following extract from the 
records of the Board of War will show: 

"Mr John Peck agreeable to desire at- 
tended the Board & being enquired of 
whether & at what Rate he would furnish 
the Draft & Models for the New Ship 
to be built, replied he would be £500 Ster- 
ling — he was then asked whether 10,000 
paper Dollars would be sufficient, which 
he totally refused, firmly adhering to his 
first demand, declaring he would not accept 
one farthing lefs — which terms the Board 
were unanimously of opinion were inad- 
mif sable." 

The following document shows how 
some of the money to be thus expended 
was raised: 

"Ordered, that the Board of War be & 
t ! .ey hereby are permitted to transport 
thirty barrels of rum from this State to 
the State of New Yoek by land for the 
purpose of purchasing a quantity of Hemp 
for a new Ship ordered to be built for 
the defence of the State, any act to the 
contrary notwithstanding." 

The following extracts from the Board 
of War, Minute Book, are interesting: 
"June 3, 1780. 

Ordered, That Captain Hopkins deliver 
Maj.'Webb, for the new Ship building by 



Mr Morgan, 4 ps Red Bunting, 4 ps Blue 
do, 4 ps White do." 

"June 7, 1780. 

Ordered, That Mr. Ivers pay Mr John 
Titus Morgan on acct. of his contract for 
Building a New Ship for 18 guns, 18000.12 
Exchange 68 Dollars for 1 Silver do." 
"June 10, 1780. 

Ordered, That Capt. Hopkins deliver Mr 
fohn Titus Morgan (building a New Ship) 
500— 6d Nails 200— lOd Nails." 

About August 1st Captain Allen Hallet 
petitioned the Board of War, that as " he 
had served the State satisfactorily in pre- 
vious commands & had been kept on shore 
& out of employ for a long space of time 
& had refused private offers, confiding in 
the promises of the Board of War that he 
should be promoted to the first vessel pur- 
chased by the State, and asking that he be 
appointed to the command of the ship in 
process of construction at Boston for State 
service." 

" Recommendation dated War office Aug. 
3, 1780, signed by Sam. Phips Savage, by 
order of the Board of War, addressed to 
the Council recommending that said Capt 
Hallett be commissioned as commander of 
the ship in process of construction at Bos- 
ton for state service." 

" Ordered, that Captain Allen Hallett be 
& hereby is appointed to the command of 
the Ship building in the town of Boston 
by order of Government." 

Council Records, August 3, 1780. 

" Capt Allen Hallett waited on the Board, 
& produced his commission from the 
Honble Councel appointing him command- 
er of the New Ship building by Mr Mor- 
gan." Board of War, August 17, 1780. 



44 



THE MASSACHUSETTS MAGAZINE 



During the last half of 1780, many refer- 
ences to this ship are found in the Minute 
Book of the Board of War. They include 
amounts voted to the builder, and to vari- 
ous other parties for materials, hardware, 
cordage, rum for the workmen, etc. Some 
of the most interesting or curious items 
are the following : 

"August 3, 1780. Ordered, that Mr 
Ivers pay John Titus Morgan on Account, 
28,000. Exchange at 70 for one." 

"August 4, 1780. Ordered, that Mefsrs 
Heny & Rand deliver John Titus Morgan 
2 Barrells N. E. Rum for Ship building 
by him, 59 gallons." 

"August 14, 1780. Ordered, that Isaac 
Smith Esqr have Credit for his Bill of 
Cordage for New Ship building by Mr 
Morgan. 3 Coils, wt 18:0:27 @ £750 
13680:16:05." 

"August 19, 1780. Ordered, that Mr 
Ivers pay Mr John Titus Morgan, on ac- 
count, 10,000. Exchange 72 for one." 

"August 22, 1780. Ordered That Mr 
Ivers pay Capt Allen Hallett On account 
for New Ship 300." 

"September 11, 1780. Ordered, That 
John Rowe Esqr deliver Capt Hopkins 336 
lb Deck Nails for the New Ship, at £6.— 
3016." 

"September 15, 1780. Ordered That Mr 
Samuel Barrett Jun deliver the Riggers 
for the New Ship. 50 yards Canvafs 
(from the Penets old sails) for Parslin." 

"October 3, 1780. Ordered That Mr 
Ivers pay John Titus Morgan on Account 
6000 Exchange at 73 for one." 

"December 6, 1780. Ordered That Mr 
Ivers pay Jeffrey Richardson for 7:0:0 
Shakings for Oakum for Ship Tartar @30 
210." 

"December 6, 1780. Ordered That Capt 
Samuel Harris have Credit for his Bill for 
Ship Tartar 2 Masts 1750." 

"December 30, 1780. Ordered that Mr 
Ivers pay Allen Hallet on acct. 300." 



"January 23, 1781. Ordered that Wm 
McNeill & Son have Credit for 63c:lqr:27 
lb Cordage Supplied for Ship Tartar, at 
£650. 41,269.3.11." 

The state authorities, owing probably to 
lack of funds, referred the matter of com- 
pleting the " Tartar " to a committee with 
the following result: 

" Report of the Committee of both 
Houses appointed to take into Considera- 
tion the report of the Committee appointed 
to sell the Ship Tartar viz In Senate Jany 
26, 1781. Read & accepted sent down for 
Concurrence Jany 27, 1781. Read & con- 
cerred." 

" Ordered that Col. Glover, Capt Ward, 
Col. Thorndike be a Committee to con- 
sider the Exigency of selling the Ship 
Tartar and to estimate the Value of sd 
Ship." Journal of the House of Repre- 
sentatibes. February 14, 1781. 

Ten days later we read that " The Com- 
mittee appointed to consider the Expedi- 
ency of selling the Tartar &c reported that 
it was expedient & that the value thereof 
be £5500 hard Money. Thereupon ordered 
that the sd Committee bring a Resolve for 
sd purpose who reported which was read 
& accepted & sent up for Concurrence." 

The following quotation shows that the 
authorities changed their minds before the 
sale took place : 

"Whereas the Honourable Caleb Davis 
Esq. has by a resolve of this Court of the 
14th day of February, 1781, been impow- 
ered and directed to make sale of the new 
ship called the Tartar, and it now appears 
to this Court that it will be more advan- 
tageous to this Commonwealth to retain 
the ship aforesaid, and to fit her out for 
public service, and to make sale of the ship 
Mars, lately arrived from France, instead 
of the ship Tartar. 

Resolved, That the resolve aforemen- 
tioned be, and hereby is repealed and made 
null and void, and that the Honorable 



DEPARTMENT OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION 



45 



Caleb Davis, Esq. be, and hereby is impow- 
ered and directed as soon as may be after 
the ship Mars is discharged from her pres- 
ent voyage, to make sale of her on the best 
and most advantageous terms to the Com- 
monwealth, reserving such cannon and other 
stores as may be now wanted for the use 
of the Commonwealth, and to apply the 
money arising from the sale of said ship 
to the purposes of paying all the reasonable 
demands for materials and services in 
building said ship Tartar, and to employ 
the remainder towards compleating said 
ship, and fully equipping her for sea. 

Resolved, That the Honorable Caleb 
Davis, Esq: instead of fitting out two 
small vessels to guard the coast as directed 
by resolve of the 19th day of February, 
1781, be, and hereby is directed, to fit one 
small vessel to mount from eight to twelve 
guns, to serve as a tender to said Tartar." 
March 6, 1781. 

" Ordered that Mr Ivers, pay John Titus 
Morgan on account ship Tartar's Contract 
56596:13:04. Exchange settled as reffer- 
ance at 82 1-2 for one." May 1, 1781. 

CAPTAIN ALLEN HALLET contin- 
ued to act as her commander, although 
without sea service, until May 27, 1781, as 
shown by the following: 

"Pay Roll of Allen Hallet for his Serv- 
ice as Capt of the Ship Tartar agreeable 
to the Establishment made Jan 1777. 

Time of Entry 3 Aug, 1780. Time of 
Discharge 27 May 1781. Service 9 Mo 25 
Days. Wages per Mo £12:0:0. Amt of 
Wages £118:0:0." 

Captain Hallet served later as commander 
of the privateer ship "Franklin" in 1781 
and the privateer brigantine " Minerva " 
»n 1782. A full account of his naval service 
has been given in the Massachusetts Maga- 
zine, V. I, pp. 106-107. 

During the summer they attempted again 
to dispose of the "Tartar" by sale: 



" Resolved That John Rowe and Stephen 
Higginson Esqr's be, and they hereby are 
appointed a committee together with the 
agent, to make sale, as soon as possible, 
of the ship Tartar, together with all her 
guns, stores, and appurtenances, for hard 
money or bills of the new emission, at 
public or private sale, as they shall judge 
most for the interest of Government, and 
the agent aforesaid is hereby directed to 
pay the proceeds of the sale of said ship 
into the treasury, reserving out of the over- 
plus of the five thousand pounds, together 
with the ten thousand pounds aforesaid, 
(appropriated that day out of the proceeds 
of the prize goods) a sufficient sum to pay 
the several ballances that may be due to 
the tradesmen who have been employed in 
building said ship. Etc." 

The " Tartar " was not sold at this time, 
either, probably owing to the fact that no 
suitable purchaser appeared. The ship re- 
mained in an incomplete state until May 2, 
1782, when she is mentioned in the records 
as follows : 

" On the representation of Caleb Davis ; 
agent for this Commonwealth; 

Resolved, That the said agent be, and 
he is hereby directed, to fit with all possible 
dispatch, the ship Tartar and sloop Win- 
throp for sea, to be employed for the pro- 
tection of the coasts of this Common- 
wealth," etc. 

June 24, 1782, a resolve was passed "That 
the Treasurer be, and he is hereby directed, 
to pay into the hands of Caleb Davis Esq. 

the sum of six hundred pounds 

by him to be applied to the purpose of 
compleating the ship Tartar for sea; and 
the said Davis to be accountable; and the 
remainder of the money to be applied to 
such purposes as the General Court shall 
hereafter order." 

The officers of the "Tartar" on this 
cruise in the summer of 1782 are shown in 
the following: 



46 



THE MASSACHUSETTS MAGAZINE 



"Pay Roll for the Officers and Men be- 
longing to the State Ship Tartar, John 
Cathcart Esq. Com. 

CAPTAIN JOHN CATHCART of Bos- 
ton, had previously served as commander 
of the State brigantine " Tyrannicide " in 
1779 at Penobscot and the privateer ship 
"Essex" in 1780. March 1, 1782, he was 
engaged as commander of the State ship 
" Tartar." A full account of his naval 
exploits has been given in the Massachu- 
setts Magazine, v. I, pp. 106-7. 

FIRST LIEUTENANT CLEMENT 
LEMON. The record of his naval service 
has been given in the account of the State 
ship " Protector " in the Massachusetts 
Magazine, v. Ill, pp. 181-3. He was in 
all probability the man of that name who 
resided in Salem and was a Corporal in 
Captain Thomas Barnes's Company, Colonel 
John Mansfield's 19th Regiment, Army of 
the United Colonies. He enlisted May 8th, 
1775, while Colonel Mansfield's Regiment 
was the 7th in the Provincial Army. From 
September to December, 1776, he was a 
Sergeant in Captain Thomas Barnes's 
Company, Lieut. Colonel Thomas Nixon's 
4th Regiment, Continental Army. He was 
engaged as First Lieutenant on the State 
ship "Tartar," May 13, 1782. 

SECOND LIEUTENANT GEORGE 
PILSBERRY was Prize Master on the 
State brigantine " Tyrannicide," commanded 
by Captain Allen Hallet, engaged February 
11, 1779, discharged April 30, 1779. He 
may have been and probably was the man 
of that name who served as a seaman on 
the State brigantine "Active," Captain 
Allen Hallet, engaged June 6, 1779; dis- 
charged August 31, 1779. May 13, 1782, 
he was engaged as Second Lieutenant on 
the State ship " Tartar," commanded by 
Captain John Cathcart. 



CAPTAIN OF MARINES SAMUEL 
WALES was engaged to serve in that rank 
on the State ship "Tartar," May 13, 1782. 
He had previously seen service on the 
State brigantine "Hazard" and State ship 
" Protector." A full account of his naval 
service has been given in the Massachusetts 
Magazine V. Ill, pp. 182-3. 

MASTER TIMOTHY MOUNTFORD 
was engaged as Master on the State ship 
"Tartar," May 13, 1782. 

SURGEON ABIJAH CHEEVER was 
the son of Abner and Elizabeth (Newhall) 
Cheever. He was born in Saugus, May 23, 
1760. He was a member of the Committee 
of Correspondence (seven members) of 
Lynn, chosen at a " large Town Meeting," 
January 6, 1772. "Deacon" Abijah Cheever 
was chosen January 5, 1775, a member of 
the committee to carry into erTect the 
Articles of Association of the Continental 
Congress. He was the " A. Cheiver, Lynn, 
Doctor," who served at Concord battle, 
April 19, 1775, and elsewhere. He gradu- 
ated at Harvard in 1779, and was Surgeon's 
Mate in the Hospital Medical Department 
from July 16 to December 31, 1779. He 
was also Surgeon's Mate in the Medical 
Department, of the Continental Army, from 
January 1 to December 31, 1780. He was 
engaged as Surgeon of the State ship " Tar- 
tar," Captain John Cathcart, May 13, 1782. 

After the war he practised his profession 
in Boston, where he married, July 5, 1789, 
Elizabeth Scott, daughter of Daniel Scott 
of Boston. He married second, October 
16, 1798, Sally Williams. About 1810 he 
moved back to Saugus, where he lived 
until his death. He lived in a fine mansion 
which he built in Saugus, near the New- 
buryport turnpike, and near the scene of his 
birth. In a letter written to Hon. John C. 
Calhoun he stated that " On a sudden 
emergency in 1782, I acted as surgeon's 



DEPARTMENT OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION 



47 



mate of the ' Tartar,' the enemy having in- 
vested our seacoast. I was taken and kept 
prisoner of war at New York until peace 
was declared." He also wrote to the same 
man : " While surgeon of the ' Tartar/ after 
she was converted into a letter of marque. 
I was made prisoner when she was cap- 
tured by a British frigate, after a close 
engagement of six hours and lost all my 
property; then when I returned home, I 
was obliged to sell my Final Settlement, 
which I received from the United States 
in payment for my services as Hospital 
Mate, for one seventh of the face of them 
to support myself." He was pensioned at 
$20 per month from April 18, 1818. His 
claim was stricken off in 1820. He died 
in Saugus April 21, 1843. Dr. David W. 
Cheever, the distinguished surgeon and 
Harvard professor, is a grandson of Dr. 
Abijah. 

SURGEON'S MATE FRAN de HOP- 
PELEIN was engaged to serve in that rank 
on the State ship " Tartar," July 4, 1782. 

All of the above officers were discharged 
November 22, 1782, with the exception of 
Captain John Cathcart, November 23d, and 
the Surgeon's Mate, the 25th. 

Another committee was appointed No- 
vember 12, 1782, authorized and directed 
to sell the "Tartar." The following ad- 
vertisement appeared in the Saiem Gazette 
of November 21, 1782: 
"To be fold (purfuant to orders of the 

General Court) The exceedingly well- 
built and fast sailing 
Ship TARTAR 

Burthen about 400 tons, mounts eighteen 
9-pounders, two of which are brafs, and 
two 6-pounders, with all her ftores, or fuch 
part of them as may fuit the purchafer. 
She is exceedingly well found, and fitted 
»n the beft manner for a cruifing f hip ; 
almoft new, having been but three months 
at fea fince fhe was built, and is in every 



refpect as good a fhip as any of her bur- 
then built the prefent war. Inventory of 
her ftores may be feen at the Agent's office 
in Kilby-Street, Bofton, where alfo the 
terms of fale may be known." 

Twelve hundred pounds of the purchase 
money was paid to Commissary General 
Richard Devens to be used in fitting out 
the State sloop " Winthrop." 

The purchasers used her as a privateer, 
as the following documents show: 

" To His Excellency the Governor & The 
Honble The Council of the Commonwealth 
of Mafsachusetts. 

The Petition of John Coffin Jones & 
others of Boston. Humbly fhews, That 
they have equipped for Sea the Ship called 
the Tartar burthened 400 Tons navigated 
by 60 men Carrying 14 Guns having on 
board as provisions 30 bbls Beef & pork 
3000wt of Bread as Ammunition 600 
powder & fhott in proportion said Vefsel 
is intended as a Letter of Marque. 

Yr Petitioners therefore pray your Ex- 
cellency & Honors to Commifsion John 
Cathcart to command the said Vessel for 
the purpose above mentioned. 

And as in Duty bound will pray 
John Cathcart 
Boston January 8, 1783. in behalf of the 
Concerned." 

She was owned by John Coffin Jones and 
others of Boston, and her bonders were 
John Cathcart, John Coffin Jones and John 
Fenno, all of Boston. 

" Petition dated Boston Jan. 8, 1783, 
signed by said Cathcart in behalf of John 
Coffin Jones & others of Boston asking for 
a commission as commander of the ship 
called the 'Tartar.' 

Granted in Council Jan. 8, 1783." 
The following extracts from the records 
show how the funds obtained from the 
sale of this ship were used: 

" Resolved That so much of the money 
in the treasury proceeding from the sale 



i -■'■ ■■ , .'V« „- 



48 



THE MASSACHUSETTS MAGAZINE 



of the ship Tartar as may be sufficient to 
pay the members of the General Court for 
their travels and attendance, according to 
the rolls of the present session, be and 
hereby is appropriated for that purpose, and 
that the Treasurer be, and hereby is di- 
rected to govern himself accordingly." 

Further sums from this sale were voted 
to pay members of the Council, Senate & 
House of Representatives. March 20, 1783. 

Resolved That Caleb Davis 

Esq.; late Agent be, and he is hereby di- 
rected to pay the sum of fifteen hundred 
pounds, being part of the proceeds of the 

sales of the Ship Tartar into 

the treasury of this Commonwealth." 
March 26, 1783. 

From the letter written by Surgeon 
Abijah Cheever to Hon. John C. Calhoun, 
we know that the Letter of Marque ship 
"Tartar" was captured by a British frigate, 
after a close engagement of six hours and 
the officers and men were carried into cap- 
tivity at New York. We know that the 
captain and surgeon were the same officers 
who served on her while in the service of 
the State and it is probable that most of 
the other officers also served with them. 
No further records of naval service by 
them can be found, however. 



Lieutenant Wells Chase of Colonel James 
Frye's Regiment. 

We are indebted to Mr. William E. 
Gould of Brookline, who has given thor- 
ough study to this branch of the Chase 
family, for information which goes to prove 
that the lieutenant was not Wells Chase 
Junior, but his father, Wells Chase Senior, 
in spite of the facts that the father was in 
his sixty-fifth year at the outbreak of the 
Revolution and saw less service in the 
French war than his son Wells, Junior. 
After carefully reviewing the evidence 
submitted by Mr. Gould, we examined the 
records of Amesbury and Newbury, Mass- 
achusetts; and Concord, N.H. As a result 
of this investigation we print the following 
as in our opinion the record of the officer 
who bore that name in Colonel Frye's 
Regiment: 

FIRST LIEUTENANT WELLS CHASE 
of Amesbury, was the son of Moses Chase, 
Junior, and Elizabeth (Wells) Chase 
of Newbury. He was born October 4, 
1710. He was a member of Captain Rich- 
ard Kelly's 2nd Militia Company of Ames- 
bury in June, 1757. He served as a Lieut- 
enant in Captain Matthias Hoyt's Compa- 
ny of Minute Men on the Lexington Alarm, 
April 19, 1775. His name appears as 
First Lieutenant in Captain John Currier's 
Company, Colonel James Frye's Regiment, 
May 26, 1775. He was wounded in the 
battle of Bunker Hill and lost a "bayonet, 
gun, coat, great coat, knapsack and 
shoes." 



MASSACHUSETTS IN LITERATURE 



By Charles A. Flagg 



Recent titles of a historical or descriptive character dealing with the state or its localities. The list in- 
cludes not only books and pamphlets, but articles wherever round; in periodicals, society publications, etc. 

While it primarily calls attention to material appearing since the last issue of this magazine, frequently 
titles are included which had been overlooked in previous numbers. 



GENERAL. 
American. Transactions and collections 
of the American Antiquarian Society. 
Volume IX-XI. [Worcester, 1909.] 
Vol. IX-X, The diary of Isaiah Thomas, 
1805-1S28. Vol. XI, Manuscript records of 
the French and Indian war in the library 
of the Society. 

Arthurs. On the old Boston post road. 
By S. M. Arthurs. (Scribner's maga- 
zine, Nov., 1908. v. 44, p. 513-620.) 
Bailey. The separation of church and state 
in Mass. By Ebenezer Bailey. (Fitch- 
burg Historical Society. Proceedings 
1908. v. 4, p. 19-34.) 
Baker. Bibliography of lists of New Eng- 
land soldiers. By Mary E. Baker. 
(New England historical and genealogical 
register, Jan.-Oct. 1910. v. 64, p. 61-72, 
128-135, 228-237, 327-336.) 
Pt. 1, U. S. in general; pt. 2, New Eng- 
land, Maine, New Hampshire (general); pt. 
3. New Hampshire (local), Vermont; pt. 4, 
Massachusetts. 

Beale. A famous war song: "John 
Brown's body," as adopted and sung by 
the 12th Mass. volunteers. By James 
Beale. (Magazine of history, July, 1910. 
v. 12, p. 70-72.) 

Billings. The history of the Tenth Mass. 
battery of light artillery in the war of 
the Rebellion. By J. D. Billings. Bos- 
ton, The Arakelyan press, 1909. 496 p. 

Chase. The beginnings of the American 
revolution, based on contemporary let- 
ters, diaries and other documents. By 
Ellen Chase. New York, The Baker and 
Taylor co., 1910. 3 v. 
Largely on Mass. events down to the 

siege of Boston. 

Clarke. Hawthorne's country. By Helen 
A. Clarke. New York, The Baker and 
Taylor co., 1910. 348 p. 
♦«„ T £ e Mass - localities include Salem. Bos- 
ion, Concord, West Roxbury and Lenox. 



Davis. Colonial currency reprints. 1682- 
1751 ; with an introduction and notes by 
A. M. Davis. Vol. I. Boston, Prince 
Society, 1910. 471p. (Prince Society 
publications.) [v. 32.] 
Dennis. Some Mass. historical writers. 
By A. W. Dennis. (Mass. magazine. 
Jan. 1908-Jan. 1909. v. 1, p. 38-42, 113- 
116, 184-185, 276-277; v. 2, p. 51-53.) 
Flagg. Mass. pioneers. Michigan series. 
By C. A. Flagg. (Mass. magazine, Apr. 
1908-Apr. 1910. v. 1, p. 73-81, 186-190, 
269-273; v. 2, p. 39-40, 66-68, 200-202; 
v. 3, p. 53-56, 117-120.) 
An alphabetical index of envqrants from 
Mass. as found in the biographical county 
histories of Michigan, comprising not only 
settlers in Mich, but ancestors of such set- 
tlers, as far as they are reported as coming 
from Mass. Parts 1-8, (Abbe-Frieze.) 

Some interesting articles on Mass. 

in recent magazines. By C. A. Flagg. 
(Mass. magazine, April 1908-Oct. 1909. 
v. 1, p. 111-112, 192-194, 288; v. 2, p. 42-44, 
99-100, 162-164, 228-229.) 

Some Mass. books of 1908. (Mass. 



magazine, Jan., 1909. v. 2, p. 49-50.) 
Forsyth. The New England colony and 
government Founding of Plymouth and 
Mass. Bay colonies. By the Viscount de 
Fronsac. (American historical maga- 
zine, N. Y. May 1909. v. 4, p. 275-289.) 
Forming part III of his Rise of the 
United Empire Loyalists. 

Gardner. Col. John Glover's Marblehead 

regiment, 1775-1776. By F. A. Gardner. 

(Mass. magazine, Jan.-Apr., 1908. v. 1, 

p. 14-20. 85-102.) 
Col. William Prescott's regiment, 

1775-1776. By F. A. Gardner. (Mass. 

magazine, July-Oct, 1908. v. 1, p. 149- 

167, 235-259.) 

The founders of the Mass. Bay 



colony. By F. A. Gardner. (Mass. 
magazine, Jan., 1908. v. 1, p. 27-37.) 



50 



THE MASSACHUSETTS MAGAZINE 



The " Massachusetts," state brigan- 

tine. Bv F. A. Gardner. (Mass. maga- 
zine, Oct., 1908. . v. 1, p. 280-286.) 

The settlers about Boston before the 



Winthrop migration in 1630. By F. A. 
Gardner. (Mass. magazine, Apr., 1908. 
v. 1, p. 107-108.) 

Ship " Hendrick," privateer in the 



Revolution. By F. A. Gardner. (Mass. 
magazine, Jan., 1908. v. 1, p. 52-53.) 
Sloop "Tyrannicide." By F. A. 



Gardner. (Mass. magazine, Apr., 1908. 
v. 1, p. 103-107.) 

State brigantine " Hazard," 1777- 



1779. By F. A. Gardner. (Mass. maga- 
zine, July, 1908. v. 1, p. 195-199.) 

Grand. Journal of the 42d [ — 44th] an- 
nual encampment, Department of Mass., 
Grand Army of the Republic, Faneuil 
Hall, Boston, Mass. Boston, 1908 
[—1910]. 3v. 

Guild. Massachusetts to-day. By Curtis 
Guild. (Mass. magazine, Oct., 1908. v. 1, 
p. 214.) 

Jenkins. The author of the John Brown 
song. By J. H. Jenkins. (Magazine of 
history, June, 1910. v. 11, p. 337-341.) 
Originally written and sung by members 

of the Boston Light Infantry Battalion at 

Fort Warren, Apr. -May, 1861. 

Letters. Letters on the defence of the 
frontier towns against Indian incursions 
in 1694-95; from the collection of C. P. 
Greenough. (Mass. Historical Society. 
Proceedings, 1910. v. 43, p. 505-519.) 

Long. The salt marshes of the Mass. coast. 
By H. F. Long. (Essex Institute his- 
torical collections. Jan. 1911. v. 47, p. 
1-19.) 

McClintock. Candidates for the office of 
lieutenant-governor, 1908: Cole, Froth- 
ingham, Luce. By J. N. McClintock. 
(Mass. magazine, July, 1908. v. 1, p. 137- 

- — Governor Curtis Guild, Jr., and 

Lieut.-Gov. E. S. Draper. By J. N. Mc- 
Clintock. (Mass. magazine, Oct., 1908. 
v. 1, p. 207-218.) 

Manning. The printing of records. By 
W. H. M. (Mass. magazine, Jan., 1908. 
v. 1, p. 44.) 

Mason. History and complete roster of 
the Mass. regiments, minute men of '61, 
who responded to the first call of Presi- 
dent Abraham Lincoln, April 15, 1861. 



By G. W. Mason. Boston, Smith & Mc- 

Cance, 1910. 413 p. 
The 3d, 4th. 5th, bth and Sth raiments 
3d battalion of Rifles and the Boston Light 
Artillery. 

Mass. Manual for the use of the General 
court. Boston, 1908-1910. 3 v. 

Twenty-second report on the cus- 
tody and condition of the public records 
of parishes, towns and counties. H. E 
Woods, commissioner. Boston, 1910. 7 p. 
(Public document 52.) 

Proceedings of the Mass. Historical 



Society. 3d series. Vol. I. 1907, 1908. 
Boston, 1908. 584 p. 



Vol. XLI of entire series. 



Massachusetts Historical Society. 

Proceedings, Oct. 1909-June 1910. Vol. 
XLIII. Boston, 1910. 754 p. 

Circular no. 23. Thirteenth Mass. 



regiment. [Boston, 1910.] 36 p. 
Chas. E. Davis, Jr., Boston, secretary. 

The Massachusetts magazine, pub- 
lished quarterly. Vol. III. [Salem, The 
Salem Press Co., 1910.] 280 p. 

Massachusetts year book for 1908. 



Worcester, F. S. Blanchard & co., 1907. 
344 p. 

Military. The Mississippi Valley, Tennes- 
see, Georgia, Alabama, 1861-1864. Papers 
of the Military Historical Society of 
Mass. Vol. VIII. Boston, 1910. 619 p. 

New. Meeting of the New England His- 
toric Genealogical Society. Oct. 22, 1909, 
to commemorate its 65th anniversary. 
Boston, 1910. 21 p. 

Proceedings of the New England 

Historic Genealogical Society, at the an- 
nual meeting, 26 Jan. 1910, with memoirs 
of deceased members. Boston, 1910. 
LXX p. (Supplement to April no. of the 
New England historical and genealogical 
register.) 

New England historical and gene- 



alogical register, 1910. Volume LXIV. 
Boston, 1910. 382, CXVIII p. 

Newcombe. First commander of the pa- 
triot army in the American Revolution. 
Artemas Ward. By Florence W. D. 
Newcombe. (Journal of American his- 
tory. 4th quarter, 1910. v. 4, p. 559-567.) 

Old. Old South leaflets. XXVI, 1908. 
Lives of great men. Boston, 1908. 
[168] p. 
Probably the last of this series. 



RECENT MAGAZINE ARTICLES 



51 



Pesvvpacker. Pennsylvania in American 
history. By Hon. S. W. Pennypacker. 
Philadelphia, 1910. 494 p. 
In the essay entitled "Pennsylvania and 
Massachusetts"" on pages 172-194, Gov. Pen- 
nypacker takes up the cudgels for his state 
In replving to an article in "Atlantic month- 
ly" for Oct., 1901. 

Prince. Prince Society. Publications [no. 
32] Boston, 1910. Part 1, of A. M. 
Davis' " Colonial currency reprints, 1682- 
1751." 

Roe. Monuments, tablets and other me- 
morials erected in Mass. to commemorate 
the services of her sons in the War of the 
rebellion, 1861-1865. Collected and ar- 
ranged by A. S. Roe. Boston, Wright 
and Potter printing co., state printers, 
1910. 132 p. 

The Tenth regiment, Mass. volun- 
teer infantry, 1861-1864. A western Mass. 
regiment. By A. S. Roe. Springfield, 
The Tenth Regiment Veteran Associa- 
tion, 1909. 535 p. 

Savage. Letter of James Savage, Jr. May 
28, 1862, relative to the part borne by 
the 2d regiment of Mass. volunteer 
infantry during the campaign in the 
Shenandoah Valley. (Mass. Historical 
Society. Proceedings, 1908. 3d series, 
v. 1, p. 117-124.) 

Smith. The Massachusetts and New 
Hampshire boundarv line controversv, 
1693-1700. By Jonathan Smith. (Mass. 
Historical Society. Proceedings. 1910. 
v. 43, p. 77-88.) 

Society. Bulletin of the Society for the 
Preservation of Xew England* Antiqui- 
ties. Vol. I, no. 1, Mav 1910. Boston, 
1910. 8 p. 
A new society, of which William S. 

Appleton, 20 Beacon St., Boston, is corres- 
ponding secretary. 

Stanwood. The separation of Maine from 
, Mass. By Edward Stanwood. (Mass. 

Historical Society. Proceedings. 1908. 

3d series, v. 1, p. 125-164.) 
Swartz. American freedom's first test. 

By L. E. Swartz. (Americana, N. Y. 

Sept. 1909. v. 4, p. 677-687.) 
Shay's Rebellion. 

Titus. The last survivors of the War for 
independence. By Anson Titus. (Am- 
erican monthly magazine. Oct-Dec, 
1910. v . 37, p. 310-312, 388-390, 474-475.) 

1000 names, with dates of decease, chiefly 
«rorn newspapers. Nearly all the deaths oc- 



curred after 1S30 and a large proportion in 
Mass. 

Parts 4-6. covering Dean-Durfee; Eager- 
Fuller, and Fuller-Gunn. respectively. Began 
May, 1910. v. 36, p. 536. 

Vassall. Letters of William Vassall, a 
Tory, to Simeon Potter, 1784-85. (^Mass. 
Historical Society. Proceedings. 1908. 
3d series, v. 1, p. 210-219.) 

Waters. Neglected condition of old burial 
places. By T. F. Waters. (Mass. maga- 
zine, Apr., 1908. v. 1, p. 117-118.) 

Preservation and marking of his- 
toric spots. By T. F. Waters. (Mass. 
magazine, Jan., 1908. v. 1, p. 56-60.) 

W r HiTE. The Dorchester Company at Cape 
Anne; answer of John White and John 
Watts to the bill of complaint, 12 Oct 
1635. (Mass. Historical Societv. Pro- 
ceedings. 1910. v. 43, p. 493-496.) 

Wilcox. [Case of Peter Wilcox, junior, 
of Lee, sentenced to death for participa- 
tion in Shav's rebellion, 1787.] Pub. by 
D. M. Wilcox, Lee, 1910. 4 p. 
Indictment and sentence, with three 

letters on the case by Theodore Sedgwick to 

Gov. Bowdoin. 

LOCAL. 

Acushnet. See under New Bedford. 

Ashburnham. Ashburnham reservoir 

flood, 1850. By S. W. Huntley. Fitch- 
burg Historical Societv. Proceedings. 
Fitchburg, 1908. v. 4, p. 253-265.) 

The descendants of Jacob Schorl, 

who came to Boston in 1752 and settled 
in Ashburnham in 1757, with an account 
of the German immigration into colo- 
nial New England. By W. H. Schorl. 
Philadelphia, 1910. 163 p. 

Jacob Sehoff was one of a party of < 

Germans who purchased a tract of louu acres 

in Ashburnham and settled thereon. 

Berkshire Co. Seventh [—Ninth] annual 

report of the Grevlock commission. Jan., 

1908 [—Jan., 1910]. Boston, 190S[— 1910] 

3 v. 

Public document no. 67 for the respective 
years. 

First annual report of the Mount 

Everett State Reservation Commission, 
Jan., 1910. Boston, 1910. 7 p. 

Public document, no. SS>. 

The Mohawk trail. By J. A. Aiken 



(Magazine of history, June-July, 1910. 
v. 11, p. 305-313; v. 12. p. 1-8.) 
The trail extended from Williamstown 
to Deerfield. 



52 



THE MASSACHUSETTS MAGAZINE 



Billerica. The Manning homestead, 
North Billerica. By \V. H. Manning 
(Massachusetts magazine, Jan., 1908, v. 
1, P. 43. 

Boston. Annual report of the Cemetery 
department of the city of Boston for 
the fiscal year 1909-1910. Boston, 1910. 
21 p. 

A catalogue of the citv councils of 

Boston, 1822-1908, Roxbury,' 1846-1867, 
Charlestown, 1847-1873, and of the se- 
lectmen of Boston, 1634-1822, also of 
various other town and municipal offi- 
cers. Printed bv order of the City coun- 
cil. [Boston.] '1909. 402 p. 

The Boston pageant. (Outlook, 



Nov. 26, 1910. v. 96, p. 658-659.) 

Original documents selected from 



the collections of the Bostonian Society, 
1657-1773. With notes. (Bostonian So- 
ciety publications, Boston, 1908-1910. v. 
5, p. 121-137; v. 6, p. 119-136.) 

Boston's civic revival. (Outlook, 



Dec. 3, 1910. v. 96, p. 758-759.) 

A better Boston. By G. L. Cady. 



(World to-dav, June, 1910. v. 18, p. 667- 
669.) 

The Boston massacre letter of 



Daniel Chamier. Jr.. dated Boston, 18th 
June, 1770. (Maryland historical maga- 
zine, Sept., 1909. v. 4, p. 284-286.) 

The Paul Revere house. By Har- 



riet C. Cox. (Mass. magazine, Julv, 
1908. v. 1, p. 133-136.) 

Romantic davs in old Boston : the 



story of the city and of its people during 
the 19th centurv. By Mary C. Crawford. 
Boston, Little, Brown & co., 1910. 411 p. 

Life of Ccunpestris Ulm, the oldest 



inhabitant of Boston Common. By J. 
H. Curtis. Boston, W. B. Clarke co., 
1910. 88 p. 

John Paul Jones Chapter, D. A. R. 



•(American monthly magazine, Dec, 1910. 
.v. 37, p. 482.) 

Field lessons in the geography and 



history of the Boston basin. By E. L. 
Getchell. Boston, Little, Brown & co., 
1910. 186 p. 

Historic processions in Boston from 



1769 to 1829. (Bostonian Society publi- 
cations. Boston, 1908. v. 5, p. 63-119.) 



Boston Common; scenes from four 

centuries. By M. A. D. Howe. Cam- 
bridge, printed at the Riverside press, 
1910. 87 p. 

Boston's last town meeting and 



first city election. By J. M. Hubbard. 
(Bostonian Societv publications. Boston, 
1910. v. 6, p. 89-117.) 

Historic happenings on Boston 



Common. Ill — An early aviation meet. 

Bv Marion F. Lansing. (Xew England 

magazine, Sept., 1910. v. 43, p. 97-104.) 

L-alluon ascension of Durant in 1S35, 

Wise in 1S57, etc. 

Historic happenings on Boston 



Common. IV — From town to city. By 
Marion F. Lansing. (Xew England 
magazine, Oct., 1910. v. 43, p. 191-196.) 

Remarks bv E. D. Mead in protest 



against the proposed change of the name 
of Maverick Square, East Boston, with 
remarks by C. F. Adams on the disre- 
gard of historical association in the 
changes of names of streets and squares 
in Boston. (Massachusetts Historical 
Societv. Proceedings, 1907-19OS. Bos- 
ton, 1908. 3d series, v. 1, p. 527-532.) 

The Old State House and its pre- 



decessor the first town house. By C. F. 
Read. (Bostonian Society. Proceedings 
at the annual meeting, Jan. 24, 1908. 
Boston, 1908. p. 32-50.) 

Fortv of Boston's immortals ; show- 



ing illustrations and giving a brief 
sketch of 40 men of the past whose 
work would entitle them to a niche in 
a Boston hall of fame. Boston. Printed 
for the State Street Trust Co. [1910.] 
40 p. 

Boston's growth: a bird's-eye view 



of Boston's increase in territory and pop- 
ulation from its beginning to the pres- 
ent. Boston, State Street Trust Co. 
[1910.] 45 p. 

How the ladies of Boston finished 



Bunker Hill monument. By Mrs. Lillie 
B. Titus. (Mass. magazine, April, 1908. 
v. 1, p. 63-72.) 

A famous American church. ^ By 

Henry Waterman. (Americana, X. Y. 
Nov., 1909. v. 4, p. 844-848.) 

King's Chapel. 

See also Charlestown, Dorchester, 



Roxbury 



RECENT MAGAZINE ARTICLES 



53 



Bradford. Old Bradford school-days. By 
A. H. Hall. Norwood, Imprinted by 
the Plympton press, 1910. 181 p. 

Brookline. Back to the town meeting; 
Brookline's solution of the problem of 
municipal government. By A. W. Spen- 
cer. (Government, Boston, Jan., 1908. 
v. 2, p. 249-258.) 

Byfield. See Newbury. 

Cambridge. Gleanings from the records of 
the First church. By H. R. Bailey. 
(.Cambridge Historical Societv. Publica- 
tion, 1908. no. Ill, p. 109-113.) 

The Tudor house at Fresh Pond. 

By Ellen S. Bulfinch. (Cambridge His- 
torical Societv. Publication, 1908. no. 
Ill, p. 100-109.) 

Second report of the Committee on 

the identification and marking of his- 
toric sites in Cambridge. (Cambridge 
Historical Societv. Publication, 1908. no. 
Ill, p. 50-56.) 

First report appeared in Publication 
no. I. 

Some Cambridge men I have 

known. By Alexander McKenzie. (Cam- 
bridge Historical Societv. Publication, 
1908. no. Ill, p. 19-36.) 

Buildings and parts of Cambridge 

commemorated in Longfellow's poems. 
By J. K. Wright. (Cambridge Histori- 
cal Society. Publication, 1908. no. Ill, 
p. 43-47.) 

Charles River. Canoeing on the Charles. 
By Owen Macdonald. (Recreation, N. 
Y. June, 1908. v. 27, p. 243-246.) 

Charlestown. A catalogue of the city 
councils of Boston, 1822-1908, Roxburv, 
1846-1867, Charlestown, 1847-1873 . . . 
Printed bv order of the City council [of 
Boston]. 'Boston, 1909. 402 p. 

— Proceedings of the Bunker Hill 

Monument Association at the annual 
meeting, June 17, 1910. Boston, 1910. 
82 p. 

The battlefield of Bunker Hill. By 

R. W. Sprague. (Mass. magazine, July, 
1908. v. 1, p. 199-200.) 

• How the ladies of Boston finished 

Bunker Hill monument. By Miss Lillie 
B. Titus. (Mass. magazine, April, 1908. 
v. 1, p. 63-72.) 

Concord. Records of the original District 
of Carlisle. Communicated by H. E. 



Woods. (New England historical and 
genealogical register, Jan., 1908. v. 62, 
p. 32-33.) 
This District of Carlisle was set off 
1754 and re-annexed to Concord lT.'.b. A 
later or 2d district of Carlisle was estab- 
lished in 1TS0 from territory taken from Con- 
cord and other towns and became a town 
in 1S65. 

Dartmouth. The villages of Dartmouth 
'in the British raid of 1778. Compiled 
in 1839-40. by H. H. Crapo. (Old Dart- 
mouth historical sketches [1909]. no. 23, 
p. 10-16.) 

The homesteads of Apponegansett 

before 1710. By H. B. Worth. (Old 
Dartmouth historical sketches [1909]. no. 
25, p. 6-9.) 

Indian names of old Dartmouth. 

Bv H. B. Worth. (Old Dartmouth his- 
torical sketches [1908]. no. 29. p. 6-10.) 

■ Smith Mills. By H. B. Worth. 

(Old Dartmouth historical sketches 
[1908]. no. 20, p. 15-31.) 

See also under New Bedford. 

Dedham. The last of a long line. (Mag- 
azine of history, N. Y. May, 1910. v. 
11, p. 293.) 

Miss Rebecca 
Fairbanks house. 

The old Fairbanks house. By Mrs. 

Lillie B. Titus. (Mass. magazine, Jan. 
1908. v. 1, p. 25-26.) 

Deerfield. The idylls of Franklin Coun- 
ty. By T. F. Waters. (Mass. magazine,. 
July, 1908. v. 1, p. 123-131.) 
Cnietly Deerfield and the Pocumtuck 

Valley Memorial Association. 

The Old Deerfield historical pa- 
geant. By Harriet L. Childs- (Survev, 
N. Y. Aug. 6, 1910. v. 24, p. 661-663.) 

Dorchester. Thompson's Island and 
Squantum. Reprint of an article over 
the signature E. T. H. which originally 
appeared in the Boston Transcript, Nov. 
10, 1894; with copious notes by C. F. 
Adams. (Massachusetts Historical So- 
cietv. Proceedings, 1907-1908. Boston, 
1908. 3d series, v. 1, p. 532-540.) 
Thompson's Island was granted to Dor- 
chester in 1634 and annexed to Boston 1S34. 

Duxburv. Historic Duxbury in Plymouth 
County, Mass. By Laurence Bradford. 
3d edition. Boston, N. Sawver & son, 
printers, 1910. 160 p. 

Elizabeth Islands. See Gosnold. 



Fairbanks and the old 



54 



THE MASSACHUSETTS MAGAZINE 



Essex County. Essex County notarial 
records, 1697-1768. (Essex Institute his- 
torical collections, Oct., 1910. v. 46, p. 
325-332.) 

Part ln < ); series began in April, 1S95. 

V. 41, p. 183. 

Annual report of the Essex Insti- 
tute for the year ending May 2, 1910. 
Salem, 1910. 51 p. 

Fairhaven. The old men of Fairhaven. 
By J. C. Tripp. (Old Dartmouth his- 
torical sketches [1910]. no. 27, p. 7-10.) 

See also under New Bedford. 

Fitchburg. Old militia companies. By H. 
B. Adams. (Fitchburg- Historical So- 
ciety. Proceedings, 1908. v. 4, p. 136- 
145.) 

Reminiscences of the old Town 

hall. By E. F. Bailey. (Fitchburg His- 
torical Society. Proceedings. 1908. v. 
4, p. 65-79.) ' 

Early history of the City hall. By 



Ebenezer Bailey. (Fitchburg Historical 

Society. Proceedings. 1908. v. 4, p. 
226-275.) 

Fitchburg preparatory to the Revo- 



lution. By Ebenezer Bailey. (Fitchburg 
Historical Society. Proceedings. 1908. 
v. 4, p. 125-135.) 

Early real estate owners in Fitch- 



burg. By Harrison Bailey. (Fitchburg 
Historical Society. Proceedings. 1908. 
v. 4, p. 105-112.) 

Fitchburg soldiers in the Revolu- 



tion. By J. F. D. Garfield. (Fitchburg 
Historical Society. Proceedings. 1908. 
v. 4, p. 172-232.)' 

Rev. John Payson, Fitchburg's first 



minister. By J. F. D. Garfield. (Fitch- 
burg Historical Society. Proceedings. 
1908. v. 4, p. 80-86.) 

A connecting link in the military 



history of Fitchburg. (Fitchburg His- 
torical Society. Proceedings. 1908. v. 
4, p. 146-153.) 

Records of the South Infantry Company, 
1794-181G. 

Early families of Fitchburg. By 



E. S. Stearns. (Fitchburg Historical 
Society. Proceedings. 1908. v. 4, p. 
87-104.) 
Franklin County. The Mohawk trail. 
By J. A. Aiken. (Magazine of history, 



X. Y. June-Julv, 1910. v. 11, p. 305- 
313; v. 12, p. i-8.) 

An Indian trail from Williamstown to 
Deerfield. 

The idylls of Franklin County. By 

T. F. Waters. (Mass. magazine,' July, 
1908. v. 1. p. 123-131.) 
Chiefly Deerfield and the Pocumtuck 

Valley Memorial Association. 

Gosnold. Notes on the early history of 
the Elizabeth Islands. By H. B. Worth. 
(Old Dartmouth historical sketches. 
[1910.] no. 28, p. 6-7.) 

Groton. Colonel William Prescott and 
Groton soldiers at the battle of Bunker 
Hill. By S. A. Green. (Mass. Histori- 
cal Society. Proceedings. 1910. v. 43, 
p. 92-99.) 

Groveland. The houses and buildings of 
Groveland. Compiled in 1854, by Alfred 
Poore. (Essex Institute historical col- 
lections. Oct., 1910— Jan., 1911. v. 46, 
p. 289-304; v. 47, p. 25-40.) 
Parts 2-3; series began July 1910. v. 46, 

p. 193. 

Hadley. The tombstone inscriptions in 
the old part of the Center cemetery at 
Hadley. By Franklin Dexter and El- 
bridge Kingslev. (Grafton magazine, 
Nov., 1909. v. 2, p. 73-104.) 

Hamilton. Homestead of William Adams. 
Erected in Ipswich, 1641. ( Society of 
Colonial Wars in the State of California. 
Register, 15th year, 1910. p. 39.) 

Heath. Heath : a historic hill town. By 
E. P. Guild. (Mass. magazine, Oct., 
1908. v. 1, p. 219-225.) 

Hingham. John Folsom house, Hingham, 
erected 1645. (Society of Colonial Wars 
in the State of California. Register, 15th 
year, 1910. p. 99.) 

Holden. Picturesque Holden in Mass. 
By T. E. Babb. (The Village, N. Y. 
Jan., 1908. v. 2, p. 549-552.) 

Hyde Park. Camp Meigs, Readville. By 
D. Eldredge. (Hyde Park historical 
record. 1908. v. 6, p. 10-28.) 

Hyde Park historical record. Vol- 
ume VII— 1909. W. A. Mowry, editor. 
Hyde Park Historical Society. 63 p. 

Ipswich. The spectator in Ipswich. (Out- 
look, Nov. 19, 1910. v. 96, p. 24-26.) 

The Whipple house. (Mass. maga- 
zine. April, 1908. v. 1, p. 83-84.) 



RECENT MAGAZINE ARTICLES 



55 



Lakeville. Revolutionary soldiers buried 
in the cemeteries of Lakeville. Marked 
by Nemasket chapter, D. A. R. (Ameri- 
can monthlv magazine, Oct., 1910. v. 
37, p. 312-315.) 

Lee. Gravestone inscriptions, Lee, Mass. 
Including all extant of the quarter cen- 
tury. 1826-1850. Carefully reproduced. 
Lee, Press of The Berkshire gleaner, 
1910. 95 p. 
By D. M. Wilcox, continuing his earlier 

publications of Lee inscriptions. 

Soldiers buried in Lee. List of six 

wars in the three cemeteries. Compiled 
by D. M. Wilcox. [Lee, 1910.] 4 p. 

List of veterans residing in Lee on p. 4. 

Ludlow. An attempt at Utopia at Lud- 
low. Bv E. K Titus. (The Village, 
N. Y. Jan., 1908. v. 2, p. 559-561.) 

Marblehead. Col. John Glover's Marble- 
head regiment, 1775-1776. By F. A. 
Gardner. (Mass. masrazine, Jan. -Apr. 
1908. v. 1, p. 14-20, 85-102.) 

Marblehead in the year 1700. By 

Sidney Perley. (Essex Institute histori- 
cal collections. Oct., 1910— Jan., 1911. 
v. 46, p. 305-316; v. 47, p. 67-95.) 

Parts 4-5; series began in Jan., 1910. 
V. 46, p. 1. 

Medford. Stage-coach davs in Medford. 
By Eliza M. Gill. (Medford historical 
register, Oct., 1910. v. 13, p. 77-92.) 

The old Royall house. By Helen T. 

Wild. (Mass. magazine, July, 1908. v. 
1, p. 168-173.) 
Middlesex County. See also Charles 

River. 
Middlesex County. The snow-shoe scouts. 
An address by G. W. Browne. (Man- 
chester Historic Association collections. 
Manchester, N. H. .1908. v. 4, part I, 
p. 5-22.) 
A company under Capt. William Tyng 
raised 1703-04 in Chelmsford, Groton, Duns- 
table and Billerica. This article was also 
published in Granite state magazins Jan.- 
Alar., 1908. 

Col. William Prescotfs regiment, 

1775-1776. By F. A. Gardner. (Mass. 
magazine. July-Oct., 1908. v. 1, p. 149- 
167, 235-259.) 
Milton. Fourth annual report of the Mil- 
ton Historical Society. 1908-09. [Mil- 
ton, 1909.] [8] p. 

— Fifth annual report of the Milton 

Historical Society. 1909-10. [Milton, 
1910.] [8] p. 



The Milton catechism : an outline 

of the history of Milton, Mass. Milton, 
The Milton Historical Society, 1910. 88 p! 

Nantucket. Nantucket lands and land 
owners. Bv H. B. Worth. Nantucket 
1910. p. 285-335, XXIV. (Nantucket 
Historical Association. Bulletin, v. 2, 
no. 6.) 

With index to v. 2, which it completes. 

New Bedford. Old buildings of New Bed- 
ford. By H. H. Crapo. Told Dartmouth 
historical sketches. [1909.1 no. 23, o. 
17-29.) 

Some of the streets of the town of 

New Bedford. By E. P. Haskins. (Old 
Dartmouth historical sketches. [1908.] 
no. 19, p. 7-13.) 

Appended: Streets accepted by the town 
before 1S47, p. 17-18. 

Old Dartmouth historical sketches. 

no. 19-28. [New Bedford, 1908-10.] 10 
nos. 

Old Dartmouth included the modern 
Acushnet, Dartmouth, Fairhhaven, New Bed- 
ford and Westport. 

Daniel Ricketson : autobiographic 

and miscellaneous. Edited by Anna and 
Walter Ricketson. New Bedford, E. An- 
thon & sons, 1910. 233 p. 

Newbury. The story of Byfield Parish. 
By J. N. Dummer. (Magazine of his- 
tory, N. Y. July, 1910. v. 12, p. 27-35.) 
Formed from parts of Newbury and 

Rowley. 

Norfolk County. Probate index. Nor- 
folk Countv, Mass. Dedham, Transcript 
Press, 1910. 2 v. 

Northampton. Northampton, the Meadow 
City, and capital of Hampshire County. 
By W. T. Atwood. (New England mag- 
azine, Nov.-Dec, 1910. v. 43, p. 301-315.) 

Oakham. The Fobes Memorial Library, 

Oakham, Mass., with the addresses at 

the laying of the corner-stone and at the 

dedication. Oakham, 1909. 121 p. 

Historical address by H. P. Wright, p. 

18-45. 

Peabody. Capt. Samuel Flint and William 
Flint. By D. W. King; with the 13th 
annual report of the Peabody Historical 
Society, 1908-1909. Peabody, 1909. 22 p. 

Pembroke. Ancient landmarks of Pem- 
broke. Bv H. W. Litchfield. Pembroke, 
G. E. Lewis, 1909. 188 p. 



56 



THE MASSACHUSETTS MAGAZINE 



Pepperell. Prudence Wright chapter, D. 
A. R. By Annetta S. Merrill, regent. 
(American monthly magazine, Oct., 1910. 
v. 37, p. 333.) 

Plymouth. Guide to historic Plymouth : 
localities and objects of interest. Ply- 
mouth, A. S. Burbank. [1910.] 95 p. 

Plymouth Colony. Bradford's history of 
the Plymouth settlement, 1608-1650: ren- 
dered into modern English by Valerian 
Paget. New York, The John McBride 
ca 1909. 309 p. 

America's heritage — Pilgrim found- 
ations of American civilization. By C. 
W. Eliot. (Journal of American his- 
tory, 4th quarter, 1910. v. 4, p. 469-484.) 
The Mayflower's message to Amer- 



ica. By H. C. Lodge. (Journal of Am- 
erican history, 4th quarter, 1910. v. 4, 
p. 487-490.) 

Collections of the Old Colony His- 



torical Society, no. 7. Taunton, 1909. 
239 p. 

Society of Mayflower Descendants 



in the State of New York. [Constitu- 
tion and by-laws; officers and members.] 
New York. [1910.] 47 p. 

Founders of the Pilgrim republic. 



By W. H. Taft. (Journal of American 
history, 4th quarter, 1910. v. 4, p. 485- 
486.) 
Plymouth County. Indian names of 
places in Plymouth, Middleborough, 
Lakeville and Carver, Plymouth County, 
Mass., with interpretations of some of 
them. By L. N. Kinnicutt. Worcester. 

1909. 64 p. 

Provincetown. Monument erected at 
Provincetown in the year 1910 in dedica- 
tion of the historic waters where the 
Mayflower first dropped her anchor. 
(Journal of American history, 4th quar- 
ter, 1910. v. 4, p. 464.) 

Quincy. Quincy, a city of progress. By 
W. T. At wood. (New England maga- 
zine, Oct., 1910. v. 43, p. 163-170.) 

Quincy's waterfront. By F. F. 

Crane. (New England magazine, Oct., 

1910. v. 43, p. 171-178.) 
The John Adams homestead. (Mass. 



magazine, Jan., 1908. v. 1, p. 21-23.) 

Suggestions for marking of Adams 



Thompson's Island and Squantum. 

An article over the signature E. T. H., 
which originally appeared in the Boston 
Transcript, Nov. 10, 1894, with copious 
notes bv C. F. Adams. (Mass. Histori- 
cal Society. Proceedings. 1907-1908. 
Boston, 1908. 3d series, v. 1, p, 532- 
540.) 

Squantum forms part of the town of 
Quincy. 

Rowley. The story of Byfield Parish. By 
J. N. Dummer. (Magazine of history, 
N. Y. July, 1910. v. 12, p. 27-35.) 
An ecclesiastical district including parts of 

the towns of Newbury and Rowley. 

Roxbury. A catalogue of the city coun- 
cils of Boston, 1822-1908, Roxbury, 1846- 
1867; Charlestown, 1847-1873. Printed 
by order of the Citv council [of Boston]. 
[Boston.] 1909. 402 p. 

Rutland. Memorial to Rufus Putnam. 
10th annual meeting of the Rufus Put- 
nam Memorial Association in the Rufus 
Putnam house. (Ohio archaelogical and 
historical quarterly, Oct., 1910. v. 19, p. 
469-473.) 

Salem. An inventory of the contents of 
the shop and house of Captain George 
Corwin of Salem, Mass. Bay, who died 
Jan. 3, 1684-5. With a short introduc- 
tory note by G. F. Dow. Salem, 1910. 
19 p. 

Ship " Hendrick," privateer. By 

F. A. Gardner. Mass. magazine. Jan., 
1908. v. 1, p. 52-53.) 

Roger Conant. By Lucie M. Gard- 



houses. (Mass. magazine, Jan., 1908. v. 
1, p. 45-46.) 



ner. (Mass. magazine, July, 1908. v. 1, 
p. 177-182.) 
Shrewsbury. Birthplace of the "Father 
of the Revolutionary army." Historic 
old Ward homestead at Shrewsbury. 
(Journal of American historv, 4th quar- 
ter, 1910. v. 4, p. 559.) 

Southbridge. Marcy homestead, birth- 
place of Wm. L. Marcy; and Angell 
homestead, birthplace of George T. An- 
gell. (Journal of American history, 4th 
quarter, 1910. v. 4, p. 568.) 

Topsfield. The Israel Clarke account 
book, 1738-49, with list of names appear- 
ing in same. Communicated by G. F. 
Dow. (Topsfield Historical Society. 
Historical collections. 1908. v. 13, p. 
143-147.) 



RECENT MAGAZINE ARTICLES 



57 



The French Acadians in Topsfield 

and their life in exile. By G. F. Dow. 
(Topsfield Historical Society. Histori- 
cal collections. 1909. v. 14, p. 137-147.) 

Witchcraft records relating to 

Topsfield. Copied from the original 
records. . . By G. F. Dow. (Topsfield 
Historical Society. Historical collec- 
tions. 1908. v. 13, p. 39-143.) 

Vital statistics of Topsfield for the 



years 1907 and 1908. (Topsfield Histori- 
cal Society. Historical collections. 1908- 
'09. v. 13, p. 165-168; v. 14, p. 153-156.) 
These vital records have been issued 
since 1900 at the end of the volumes of His- 
torical collections. 



Records of the Congregational 

church in Topsfield. 1684-1800. Copied 
by G. F. Dow. (Topsfield Historical 
Society. Historical collections. 1909- v. 
14, p. 5-87.) 



The historical collections of the 

Topsfield Historical Society. Vol. XIV. 
1909. Topsfield, 1909. 156 p. 

Topsfield in the Witchcraft delu- 
sion. By Mrs. Abbie P. Towne and Miss 
M. Clark. (Topsfield Historical Society. 
Historical collections. 1908. v. 13, p. 
23-38.) 



Ware. Beautiful Ware. By W. T. Wood. 
(New England magazine, Oct., 1910. v 
43, p. 231-237.) 

Wellesley. VVellesley, the beautiful. By 
G. D. Adams. (Good housekeeping, 
Springfield. May, 1908. v. 46, p. 506- 
513.) 

Westport. Head of Westport and its 
founders. By H. B. Worth. (Old Dart- 
mouth historical sketches. [1908.1 no. 
21, p. 17-21.) 

See also under New Bedford. 

Woburn. Edward Convers' house, erected 

1640. (Society of Colonial Wars in the 
State of California. Register. 15th year 
—1910. p. 73.) 
Worcester. The diary of Isaiah Thomas, 
1805-1828. Edited ... by B. T. Hill. 
Worcester, 1909. 2 v. (American Anti- 
quarian Society. Transactions, v. IX- 
X.) 
Worcester County. The old Turnpike 
and turnpike days. By F. A. Currier. 
(Fitchburg Historical Society. Proceed- 
ings. 1908. v. 4, p. 154-171'.) 
••The Fifth Mass. turnpike." from North- 
field through Fitchburg to Leominster. 

Wanderings in northern Worcester 

County. (The Village, N. Y. Feb., 1908.. 
v. 2, p. 572-575.) 



(£>ntm«*ro $c (Jommntt 



on ^aofi^ ant) £>tliet £uhjech? 



Massachusetts Magazine. 
Dear Sirs : 

I have not myself any special interest 
in the subject, but I write to correct an 
impression given in your magazine last 
April, under the heading " A Publishing 
Blunder." I will say that it was not 
William M. Noble's intention to make that 
history a money-making scheme. His 
original letter circular, of which I had one, 
said: "This re-publication is in no sense 
a commercial enterprise. It is not ex- 
pected even that the cost of its reproduc- 
tion will be reimbursed. The pleasure of 
saving the old book and of receiving nu- 
merous expressions of appreciation is quite 
a sufficient compensation for any loss 
which may occur." R. T. W. 

[Ed. — We did not understand Mr. Noble 
had no idea that the publication would pay 
expenses. This in a large measure indicates 
whether a publication is worth while. 
Those who have had experience know how 
hard it is to have fresh important material 
financed for printing, and feel somewhat 
sad to see money wasted on a reprint, the 
* original of which is accessible in almost 
every important library. That was the 
sentiment we tried to express. 

A. W. D. 

Pope's simple words, "The proper study 
of mankind is man," have a special signifi- 
cance to the student of family history. 
Observing the abundant fertility of some 
branches of the family tree; the stunted, 
bark-bound existence of others; and the 
dwindling " dead wood " in others, he finds 
the causes a subject of entertaining specu- 
lation. Employment, environment, and 
local conditions, collectively or singly, are 



important factors in the prosperity and 
longevity of a family. But such a case 

as the following is inscrutable : John 

Dean, of Taunton, where the Deans are 
numerous, was a sailor, and raised a family 
of five boys; each of those five sons mar- 
ried, and had the following issue: 

2 boys, 1 girl 

3 boys, girl 
2 boys, girl 
2 boys, girl 
5 boys, 2 girls 

This gave John Dean 14 grandsons and 
3 granddaughters. Yet, strange as the case 
may seem, out of these fourteen grandsons 
not one of them has yet had a son. All 
are married, and between them they have 
thirty-five daughters. One is a minister, 
and one a hotel proprietor in Tacoma, 
Washington ; one is a blacksmith in Taun- 
ton; another a traveling salesman in 
Boston ; and all have the usual pride in 
their family and a desire to see a male 
offspring that will carry onward the name 
of Dean; but as the 14 grandsons are in 
the vicinity of forty and fifty to-day, little 
hope is entertained that a son will appear. 
One of the fourteen, more determined than 
the others, after having eleven daughters, 
still desired a son and was rewarded with 
twins — both girls — and he now has a 
family of 13 splendid daughters. 

A. W. D. 



We were considerably amused in Decem- 
ber to get the following letter from the 
librarian of the public library of Detroit, 
Mich. 



CRITICISM AND COMMENT 



59 



December 12, 1910. 
Gentlemen : 

I was informed some weeks ago that the 
publication of the Massachusetts Magazine 
would terminate with 1910. I find, how- 
ever, in the last number for the year that 
you propose giving articles on the great 
historical libraries of Boston, which does 
not look like quitting. Was I correctly 
informed? Supposing I was, the subscrip- 
tion was not received for 1911. Vol. 1, 
number 1, was never received, and as I 
desire to bind the volumes, that number 
is needed. Can you supply, and on what 
terms? An early response will greatly 

oblige. 

Yours truly, 

Henry M. Utley. 
No such thought has ever entered the 
mind of the management of the Massa- 
chusetts Magazine. No magazine ever had 
a more determined, loyal, and enthusiastic 
board of editors, and its success passed 
beyond the experimental stage after the 
first year of its existence. 



The state has recently issued an attrac- 
tive little volume of 132 pages entitled 
"Monuments, tablets and other memorials 
erected in Massachusetts to commemorate 
the services of her sons in the War of the 
rebellion 1S6M865 . . . Collected and ar- 
ranged by Alfred S. Roe, Commander, 
Grand Army of the Republic, Department 
of Massachusetts 1908-1009." 

After briefly describing the memorials 
erected by the state, at home and on 
Southern battlefields, the various cities 
and towns are taken up in alphabetical 
order. Brief and authoritative reports are 
printed from officials of local G. A. R. 
posts, town clerks or other officials, show- 
ing just what memorials have been erected. 
In this way soldiers' monuments, memor- 
ial buildings, important collections of war 
relics, etc., are described. The work is en- 
riched with a large number of high class 
illustrations, and is creditable alike to 
Commander Roe and to the state. 



A Continuation of the Genealogical Dictionary of E^sex County Families, compiled until 
Oct., 1909, by Sidney Perley, Esq., in The Es^ex Antiquarian. 

Jfamilg flfomtlngiwi 

LUCIE MARION GARDNER, A.B., Editor 

Esaex was the first county settled in the Massachusetts Bay Colony, and all the records of earlv Massai-husettn families 

found in the probate, court and town re-cords of this county prior to the year Nm are fathered 

and published here in alphabetical form, and arranged genealogically when posiiibie. 



BURNHAM, BURNUM, BURNAM. 
1 

The Burnham* family of Ipswich 
has been one of the most prominent 
and numerous in that section of Essex 
County. The brothers, John, Thomas 
and Robert, whose father's name we 
do not know settled in Ipswich some- 
where about 1635. Robert Andrews, in 
his will dated March 1st 1643, called 
John, Thomas and Robert Burnam, 
kinsmen. The statement has been made 
ihat the three men were sons of Robert 
Andrews' sister, Mary, wife of Robert 
Burnam, but the compiler of these notes 
has found no proof of this assertion. 
John and Thomas lived in Ipswich 
through their lives and died well 
advanced in years, leaving many 
descendants. 

We know that they were brothers for 
the Ipswich records state under date of 
February 27, 1648, that " twenty acres 
were granted to Thomas Burnum : "next 
to his Brothers and his owne meadow/' 

Robert was a resident of Boston as 
early as the year 1647. He resided there 
"but a short time when he removed to 

*Mr. J. Henry Lea, in his last season's work 
in England, brought to light two very inter- 
esting seventeenth century Burnham wills, in 
which the testator referred by full name to 
sons living in America. The editor has seen 
copies of these documents, which promise if 
worked out, to help greatly in showing the 
English ancestry of the Burnhams on this 
side. F. A. G. 



Dover, N. H., where he lived most of 
the remaining years of his life as nar- 
rated below. The members of the 
family have been particularly prominent 
in military affairs and many of them 
have held commissions. The part of old 
Ipswich known in early times as Che- 
bacco, and later as Essex, has been the 
special abiding place of the family. In 
arranging the family genealogically, it 
has seemed wise to give the descendants 
as the offspring of an unknown " 1" 
instead of arranging the families of the 
brothers Thomas, John and Robert 
separately. 

2 — John'-, b. about 1616. See below. 
3 — Thomas 2 , b. about 1619. See below. 
4 — Robert 2 , b. about 1624. See below. 



Corporal John Burnam 2 more 
often called deacon John,, was born 
about 16 16, according to a deposition 
made in 1638, when he declared that he 
was twenty-two years of age. He was a 
husbandman and carpenter by occupa- 
tion. He was one of the seventeen 
voung men who marched from Ipswich 
to Salem in April 1637 to join the little 
army in the Pequot War. He received a 
grant of eight acres of land in 1639 for 
service in the above war. He served 
against the Indians again in 1642-3, and 
was allowed three shillings ( twelve 
pence a day ) for said services. He pur- 
chased the Daniel Dennison house and 



FAMILY GENEALOGIES 



61 



sold it to Anthony Potter 1 : 4 mo. 1648. 
On the 10th of the 3 mo., 165 1, he and 
his wife Mary, sold to Samuel Eyers "a 
dwelling house and lot i l / 2 acres which 
was lately Anthony Potter's, who bought 
them of Deacon Whipple, who bought 
them of William Sampson to whom the 
same was granted.'' 

In a document connected with the 
case of ''Marshall vs. Cross," in the 
September term of the court in 1662, he 
is called "Corporal." He came into full 
communion with the church, Aug. 12, 
1674. 

Reference was made in 1675, to his 
wife's seat in the meeting-house. He 
was deacon of the Chebacco church. 
His wife Mary deposed in 1670, that 
she was aged about 45 years. He signed 
the Proctor petition in 1692. 

The following document dated August 
13, 1694, is of great value in locating 
his land holdings : 

"We the Committee Impowered to 
look after Incroachments, and to Settle 
the bounds where they prove not Settled, 
being informed that Deacon John Burn- 
ham, Senr, had Incroached of the 
Town's Common Land, on the South- 
westerly thereof ; between his Land 
and the new Pasture Land, so called we 
have been upon the place formerly and 
examined the matter, "and pending the 
bounds uncertainly Settled, Discoursed 
with the said Deacon Burnham, he hav- 
ing committed all into the hands of his 
son John Burnham, Consenting to what 
agreement should be made between him 
and .us ; he the said John Burnham 
paying the charge of the Committee. 
W e have settled his bounds at the head 
of Creek called Clark's Creek, near 
Joseph Andrews', his house." This 
land was in what is now Essex, between 
the Gloucester line and the creek which 



runs nearly parallel with the line. 

In a deed dated March 1, 1G<».M, he 
conveyed to his son John Burnam 
tertius, husbandman, his real estate, 
specifying that said son should 
pay to his sister Anna Low at or 
before two years after the death of 
John Burnam Sr., £30; to his sister, 
Elizabeth Kinsman, wife of Thomas 
Kinsman, £30. He also stipulated that 
John Burnam 3rd should also take good 
care of the three grandsons "ye children 
of my son Josiah Burnam, deceased, 
viz., Josiah, Jacob and Ebenezer Burnam, 
providing meat, drink, washing and 
lodging." When they came of age, they 
were to receive from their uncle, John 
Burnam 3rd, the following sums in cash : 
Josiah, £40; Jacob, £20; Ebenezer, £15. 
He died November 5, 1694. 

Children— 

5 — John 3 , b. about 1650. See below. 

6— Mary 3 , b. about 1651; d. before 1693-4. 
She deposed in 1670, age about 19 
years. 

7 — Josiah 3 , See below. 

8 — Anna 3 , m. [John?] Low. [John Low, son 
of Thomas Low who died at Chebacco 
Nov. 29, 1694, left a wid., Anna, a 
wid. Annah Low m. int. Ipswich, Jan. 
26, 1711, John Durkee of Gloucester] 

9 — Elizabeth 3 , m. first. Ipswich, Juiv 12, 
1687, Thomas Kinsman, sen of Quar- 
termaster Robert and Mary (Bore- 
man) Kinsman. He was born Apr. 
16, 1662, and died July 15, 1696. 
After his death, his wid. m. second 
[int.] July 27, 1700, Isaac Ringt, 
son of Daniel and Mary ( Kinsman) 
Ringe or Rindge. She m. third, int. 
May 21, 1715, Caleb Kimball. m 



Lieut. Thomas Burnam- was born 
about 1619, as he deposed March 29, 
1659, as aged about 40 years and again 
in November, 1668, that he was aged 
about 50 years. (County Court, Nov. 



62 



THE MASSACHUSETTS MAGAZINE 



1668.) Felt, however, in his history of 
Ipswich, states that he was 71 years of 
age at his death, which would make the 
year of his birth 1623. He was a car- 
penter by occupation. He is first men- 
tioned as an inhabitant of Ipswich in 
1643. William Hubbard and John Ap- 
pleton deposed March 8, 1697-8 that 
George Giddings sold to Thomas 
Burnam, deceased, ''some time before 
the year of our Lord One Thousand Six 
Hundred & Forty-three" the house in 
which Thomas Burnam, deceased, lived 
ever after to his decease. He was a 
soldier in an expedition against the In- 
dians in 1643, an d was allowed three 
shillings at the rate of twelve pence a 
day for this service. He worked on the 
watch house. He was elected a sur- 
veyor in 1646, and was proprietor in 
1647. He was a member of the jury in 
the Ipswich court and was fined for be- 
ing absent 26 : 7 mo. : 1648. In that year 
he was a subscriber to the fund for the 
compensation of Major Dennison. He 
was made a freeman in the Ipswich 
court in 1653. In 1656, he set up a 
saw mill near the falls on Chebacco 
river and in the following year, he 
was appointed to keep order in the 
meeting house. He served on the jury 
in the Ipswich court March 29, 1659. 
In February 1667, the privilege of com- 
monage was granted him and in May of 
that year he was given liberty to set up 
a saw mill on Chebacco river. He was 
a corporal in the local company in 1662 
and surveyor of highways in the same 
year.. He was a selectman in 1663 and 
was chosen "sergant" of the "ffoote 
company of Ipswich" May 18, 1664. He 
became ensign of the company under 
its commander "Majo General! Denis- 
son Esq.," May 12, 1675, and lieu- 
tenant March 30, 1683. He was a 



deputy in the General Court from 
Ipswich, November 1683, May 1684, 
and May 1685. He was a signer 
of the Ipswich petition in 168 1-2. 
He married Marie Lawrence, who was 
born in St. Albans, England, and bap- 
tized there April 10, 1625. She was the 
daughter of Thomas and Joane (Antro- 
bus) Lawrence. Her mother, Joane, 
married for her second husband, John 
Tuttle. Marie at the age of nine years 
came to New England in 1635 m tne 
"Planter" with her mother, Joane Tuttle, 
her step-father, John Tuttle, her 
brothers, John and William Lawrence, 
aged respectively, seventeen and twelve 
years, and her half-brothers and sisters, 
Abigail, Symon, Sara and Jo : Tuttle, 
aged six, four, two and one years. Her 
maternal grandmother, Joane Antrobus 
also came in the same vessel and "Na- 
than Heford, servant to Jo : Tuttell." 
Her father, Thomas Lawrence, was the 
son of John and Margaret (Robertes) 
Lawrence of St. Albans, England. Her 
mother, Joane, was the daughter of 
Walter and Jane (Arnolde) Antrobus. 
Antrobus of St. Albans w T as one of the 
visitation families of Hertfordshire. 
Mary, wife of Thomas Burnham, aged 
thirty-five years, deposed in 1659 con- 
cerning her mother, Mrs. Tuttle, and 
Thomas Burnam, at the same time 
in a deposition called Symon Tuttle, 
brother, and spoke of Uncle John Tuttle 
in England. His daughter, Sarah, at 
the age of twenty years married Aug. 6, 
1684, Mesheck Farley; and the groom's 
father and Thomas Burnam, the bride's 
father built a house for them . upon cer- 
tain conditions. These conditions were 
fulfilled and the deeds passed 1686. 
Nov. 14, 1 69 1, Thomas Burnam granted 
to his sons Thomas Jr. and James his 
real estate, the sons agreeing to keep 



FAMILY GENEALOGIES 



63 



the houses and barns in good order dur- 
ing the natural life of their parents ; 
agreeing also to manure and improve the 
lands, cut and carry in for their parents' 
use half the hay, each keeping in repair 
half the fences and paying half the rates 
and taxes. They also agreed to give 
to their parents half the product of the 
orchards and each keep two cows for 
their parents and one horse each sum- 
mer between them for their parents' use. 
The sons also promised to pay £30 each 
in silver, or corn or cattle. Thomas was 
also to pay to his sisters, Mary, Abigail 
and Sarah, each £20 in corn or cattle; 
James agreeing to pay a like amount to 
his sisters, Hannah, Ruth and Hester. 
Lieut. Thomas died May 19, 1694, (Essex 
Co. Prob. File No. 4174). In his will, 
dated Jan. 10, 1693-4, probated Sept. 29, 
1694, he makes mention of his wife 
Mary, and the above-named six daugh- 
ters; also his sons Thomas and James 
and another son, John, to whom he had 
conveyed his house and 6 acres of land 
at the falls Jan. 1, 1687. The inventory 
dated Sept. 29, 1694, listed only personal 
property which amounted to £205 : 16. 
He had given all of his real estate to 
his three sons, prior to his death. 
He gave to his six daughters what his 
wife had desired, the residue going to 
his wife Mary. She died March 27, 
1715* aged 92 years, "the mother of 
fifteen children and grandmother of 
seventy." 
Children: 

10— Thomas 3 , b. about 1640 (G. S.) He 

deposed Nov., 1668, age about 25 
years. See below. 
11— Mary 3 , b. about 1650 or 1651. She de- 

8osed in 1670, age about 19. She m. 
ct. 9, 1672, John Clark. She was 
probably the Mary wid. of John Clark, 
tailor, who d Feb. 1723, at Ipswich. 
12— John 3 , b. about 16.50. See below. 
13— James 3 , b. about 1651. See below. 



14 — Joanna 3 , b. about 1654. She deposed 
March, 1670, age about 16. She was 
called "Borman*' in the town record of 
her marriage to her first husband John 
Newmarsh, Jr., Nov 22, 1671. Joshua 
Coffin in his notes of E^sex and Nor- 
folk families pubh' h •! in the N.E.H. 
G. Register, vol. V, ] _'45, states that 
Joanna married Sim >n Tuttle and 
this statement has been re] eated by 
many writers; but the above testi- 
mony shows that she married John 
Newmarsh, Jr.. and this is confirmed 
by the Ipswich records. John New- 
marsh, Jr., died about 1691, leaving 
an estate which was valued at £370: 
07:06, in the inventory dated March 
30 of that year. 
She married second, Erasmus James of 
Marblehead. He gave bonds to Thomas 
Burnam, Jun., and James Burnam, brothers 
of Joanna Xewmarsh, widow, March 31, 
16S2, for "ye full and just sume of two 
hundred & fifty pounds currt silver money of 
N. E. to be paid . . . unto them or either of 
them. . . . The condition of ye above obli- 
gation is such that whereas there is a con- 
tract of marriage intended God permitting, 
between ye above Erasmus James & Joanna 
Numarsh widdow & relict of Jno Numarsh of 
Ipswich upon sd parties joyning in marriage 
the sd Erasmus doth covenant & promise to 
& wth ye said Johanna, that he will perform, 
ye several articles yt said parties have mutu- 
ally agreed upon." In these articles the said 
Erasmus James quit-claimed any interest in 
any property which had belonged to her first 
husband, John Newmarsh. He agreed that 
"whatever property she shall bring to his 
house she shall use and dispose of as she shall 
see fit." He further promised to "cause 
soone after his deceale one hundred pounds 
to bee paid in money or other of his estate, 
wch she shall accept as money." She was to 
have the use of the best room in his house 
"during her natural life. If she does not 
marry againe." Lastly "sd James shall no 
waise be charged with ye bringing up of said 
Johannah's children." Notwithstanding the 
terms of the above bond, she rendered a bill 
in July, 1719, to his estate "for what I have 
expended of my dower out of my husband 
John Newmarsh of Ipswich deed his estate 
during the time that I was the above sd 
James's wife which Continued the space of 25 
years." This account included materials for 
clothing, dresses, physician's bills, etc., etc., 



64 



THE MASSACHUSETTS MAGAZINE 



and amounted to £68: 06: 06. (Essex Prob. 
Files, Xo. 14742.) 

15— Ruth 3 , b. July 1, 1G57; died July 30, 

1757. 
16— Ruth 3 , b. Aug. 23, 1658, married at 
Woburn June 30, 1678, Li?ut. 
John Carter, son of John and Eliza- 
beth (Kendall) Carter. He was born 
in Woburn, February 6, 165--3 and 
died in Woburn April 13, 1727 (?), 
age 75 yrs. She died in Woburn 
January 10, 1724. 
17— Joseph 3 , 'b. Sept. 26, 1660. A case in 
which he was involved was tried in 
the court in 1685. He probably 
died before 1694 
18 — Nathaniel 3 , b. Sept. 4, 1662; probably 

died before 1691. 
19 — Abigail 3 , was alive in 1674 when she 
was mentioned as a young girl dis- 
orderly in meeting. 
20 — Sarah 3 , b. June 28, 1664: married in 
Ipswich Aug. 6, 1684, Mesheck Far- 
ley. The father of the groom agreed 
to provide the land and half the ex- 
pense Lieut. Burnam should incur 
in building the house. In 1686 all 
the conditions having been fulfilled, 
the house built and paid for, the 
final deeds were passed Essex deeds 
13; 108 and Rev. T. F. Waters, 
"Ipswich," p. 328. He died about 
November, 1696. 
21— Hester 3 (Esther) , b. March 19, 1665, 
She married 1685-6 Matthew Per- 
kins, son of Sergt. Jacob and Eliza- 
beth Perkins of Ipswich, March 23, 
1685-6. Sergt. Jacob Perkins gave 
his son Matthew a deed of gift of "a 
house and a quarter of an acre of 
land within that y e gate that y e 
highway leads to Jeffrey's Neck also 
two acres of planting land in ye 
field called Manning's Neck on his 
marriage with Lieut. Burnham, his 
daughter." He was born June 23, 
1665, and died April 15, 1738 ae 72 
years, 9 mos., 23 days. She died 
Oct. 6, 1749. 
22— Phebe 3 , b. March 16, 1667. 
Two other children, names unknown. Mary 
Burnham's gravestone states that she was the 
mother of fifteen children and grandmother 
of seventy. One writer has stated that Job 
Burnam who married Abigail Harris and had 
a son Job born Dec. 9, 1698, was a son of 
this couple, but the compiler of these notes 



has found nothing to warrant such a state- 
ment. Job's record will therefore be given in 
"Burnam Notes" later. 



Robert Burnam 2 was born Oct. 2, 
1624 and resided in Boston as early as 
1647. He sold a house lot in that place 
in the following year. He was in Dover 
in 1654 when he had land formerly 
granted to Ambrose Gibbons. He 
bought land at Oyster River near 
Dover, N. H., in what is now Dur- 
ham May 12, 1657. The 9:9 mo. 
1657 he was chosen a layerout of 
land at that place. He paid a tax of 
£4 at Dover the same year. He seems 
to have resided in Portsmouth, where 
he was a juryman 1659. He returned 
to Dover where he was clerk of the 
train band and selectman in 1060. 
Persons at Oyster Bank were arraigned 
for not attending meeting but Robert 
Burnam showed that he had been to 
sendees at Strawberry Bank which 
"showed him not to be obstinate." He 
was a layerout of land in Dover 4 14 mo : 
1661 and served on the trial jury in 
1665. In 1668 he was surveyor of 
highways at Dover. March 31st, 1691 
he testified with Thomas and Mary 
Burnam and Nathaniel Treadwell that 
John Newmarsh Sr. gave to his son 
John Newmarsh Jr., in 1671 a house 
and land in Ipswich when said John 
Newmarsh Jr., married Johanna the 
daughter of said Thomas and Mary. 
[ no. 14 ] In 1666 he was again 
chosen selectman in Dover and he held 
the same office in 166S, 1074 and 
1689. He was taxed at Oyster River 
in 1675. He served on the grand jury 
in 1689. He signed a N. H. petition 
for Massachusetts protection February 
26, 1689. His wife was Frances [Hill?] 



FAMILY GENEALOGIES 



65 



The name Burnam Point is found on an 
old map in the "landmarks of ancient 
Dover" by Mary P. Thompson. This 
Point was on the west part of Oyster 
River in what is now Durham. He died 
June 12, 1691. His will dated Ju le 11 
previous was probated Sept. 29,1691. In 
it he mentioned his wife Frances and 
sons Samuel and Jeremiah. He had 
"two hundred acres at Lampereele 
river" and a house at Oyster River. He 
mentioned his carpenter's tools at Che- 
bacco. The inventory of the estate 
dated March 29, 1692 amounted to 
£99:13:00. 
Children :— 

23 — Robert 3 , b. Boston 25: 7 mo: 1647; d. 
young. 

24 — Elizabeth 3 , b. Boston 27: 8 mo: 1651. 

25 — Samuel 3 , lived in Dover. He was 
"Constable for Oyster River. " in 
16S6, and died before 1719. 

26 — Jeremiah 3 , lived in Dover. He was 
selectman 1694, and was called ser- 
geant in the town records Aug. 6, 
1702. He held many other town 
offices. 

27— Robert 3 , b. Dover, Aug. 21, 1664. He 
resided in Dover. 



Deacon John Burnam 3 , son of Dea- 
con John and Mary Burnam, was born 
about 1650. As has been stated above, 
his father, Deacon John Burnam, deeded 
to him March 1, 1693-4, "his farm and 
messuage of land in Ipswich." [Essex 
Deeds, v. 10, pp. 83-5.] This was in 
Chebacco, bounded on the east, by land 
of John Downing, on the south-east by 
the Gloucester line, on the south-west 
by land of Lieutenant John Andrews, 
and on the north-west by a large creek. 
This creek has been variously called 
Clark's, Burnham's and Whitredge's 
creek. A document which we have re- 



produced in the notes upon John 
Burnam, Senior, dated August 13, 1694, 

shows that on account of boundary dis- 
putes, this farm was carefully surveyed, 
Deacon John Burnam, Senior, being 
present and testifying. This document 
and the above mentioned deed have been 
of great importance in proving that John 
Burnam 3 , (wife Sarah), was the son of 
John Burnam 2 , (wife Mary), for we know 
that after the death of John 3 , (wife 
Sarah), in January, 170S-9, this farm be- 
tween the Gloucester line and the creek, 
was divided between his sons John 4 
and Thomas 4 . [Essex Deeds, v. 43, pp. 
261-3.] April 11, 1696, he was ap- 
pointed guardian of Josiah, Jacob and 
Ebenezer, sons of his brother, Josiah. 

He died January 11, 1708-9 in the 
fifty-ninth year of his age. His will 
dated Dec. 17, 1708 was proved Feb. 
21, 1708-9. In it he mentions his two 
eldest sons, John and Thomas, his wife, 
Sarah, his daughter, Sarah, wife of 
Jacob Brown, his two younger sons, 
Jonathan and Robert and his three 
youngest daughters, Mary, Elizabeth and 
Hannah. [Essex Probate Records v. 
310, p. 86.] His widow, Sarah, died 
about June 1746. Her will dated Dec. 
20, 1733, was probated June 30, 1746. 
In it she mentioned all of the children 
named in her husband's will with the 
exception of Mary, who had evidently 
died. The daughters being named as 
Sarah Brown, Elizabeth Choate and 
Hannah Poole. 

Children:— 

28— Sarah 4 , b. about 1679; m. [int Jan. 10, 
1707-8] Lieut. Jacob Brown, son of 
Nathaniel and Judith (Perkins) 
Brown of Ipswich. He was a cord- 
wainer and veoman and lived in 
Hamlet Parish, Ipswich. She died 
Apr. 9, 1729, at the age of fifty. He 
m. third, Elizabeth Brown of Ips- 



'W0 



66 



THE MASSACHUSETTS MAGAZINE 



wich, pub. Nov. 14, 1761. He died 
in the Hamlet Feb, 27, 1769, leaving 
an estate valued at £1387: 17: 07. 

29 — John 4 . See below. 

30— Thomas 4 , b. about 1686. See below. 

31 — Jonathan 4 . See below. 

32— Robert 4 . See below. 

33— Mary 4 , d. before 1733. 

34— Elizabeth 4 , March 24, 1692, m. Ips- 
wich, pub. Xov. 6, 1714, Thomas 
Choate, son of Thomas and Mary 
(Varnev) Choate. He was b. June 7, 
1693. He m. 2nd, Oct. 1, 173S, Mrs. 
Sarah Marshal], and 3d May 11, 1769, 
Mrs. Rachel Lufkin, nee Riggs. She 
received £15. from each of her broth- 
ers May 28, 1715, this being her por- 
tion of her father's estate. 

35 — Hannah 4 , m. Gloucester, Jan. 4, 1732, 
Jonathan Poole. She received the 
amount of £30 from her brothers 
John and Thomas in full for her 
share of her father's estate Nov. 9, 
1721. 



Josiah Burnam 3 , son of Deacon John 
and Mary, married July 12, 1687, Abi- 
gail Varney. He d. at Chebacco October 
25, 1692 and his wife died six days later 
leaving three sons Josiah, Jacob and 
Ebenezer. Their uncle, John Burnham 
was appointed guardian April 1, 1696. 
An inventory of Josiah's estate dated 
November 12, 1692, amounted to £79: 
11:01. The grandfather of the three 
orphan boys Deacon John Burnam, con- 
veyed to his son John Burnam 3 , prop- 
erty, and directed that the said John 
Burnam 3 should take good care of 
the three above named sons of his de- 
ceased son Josiah, until they became of 
age, then to give to Josiah £40., to Jacob, 
£20., and to Ebenezer £15. 

Children:— 

36 — Josiah 4 . See below. 
37 — Jacob*. See below. 
38 — Ebenezer*. See below. 



10 



Lieut. Thomas Burnam 3 , son of Lieut. 
Thomas and Mary Burnam, was born 
about 1640. He bought land in Ipswich 
of George Gedding, June 3, 1667. He 
was made a freeman in 1671. His new 
house built in that year was 20 ft. 
square. ^ In 1678 he was granted the 
right of commonage. He was called 
sergeant March 14. 1688. In 1684 he 
owned land next to his brother James. 
In the division of the estate of his father, 
the homestead and adjoining lands were 
apportioned to him. 

Aug. 28, 1702, he was commissioned 
"Lieut, of the second Foot Company of 
Militia in the Town of Ipswich, within 
the middle Regiment of the County of 
Essex in y e Province above s d of which 
comp a maj. Francis Wainwright is 
Captain." 

The following document is of interest 
in connection with his military service; 

"Lt. Thomas Burnam 

Sir:— 

1 desire that you would serve her 
majestie according to the above com- 
mission until my return [if God will] 
from Port Royal. I shall take it very- 
kindly at y r hands. 

I am, 

y r serv't 
Francis Wainwright. 
Ips. April 15th, 1707." 

Thomas sold to his son Aaron Dec. 30, 
1770, the house "now accupied by my 
sons Moses and Aaron." 

He m. first Feb. 13, 1665 Lidia Pen- 
gry. She was the daughter of Moses and 
(Lidia Clement) Pengry, Sr., of Haverhill. 
This is proven in a deed dated May 25, 
1732 when the children and heirs of 
Thomas Burnam are shown to be des- 



FAMILY GENEALOGIES 



67 



cended as above stated. She died 
March 14, 168(8) ? He married second 
16:10, 168(9)? Hester Bishop, widow 
of Samuel Bishop of Ipswich. She was 
the daughter of William and Susanna 
(Hawkes) Cogswell. She married, first, 
Aug. 10 ( Ct. R.) 1675, Samuel Bishop, 
son of Thomas and Margaret Bishop. 
Lieut. Thomas Burnam died February 
21, 1728 aged 88 years. 

Children, by first wife, Lydia: — 

39— Thomas 4 , b. Jan. 19, 1666; d. before 

1694-5. 
40— Moses 4 , b. Jan. 24, 1668. See below. 
41 — Nathaniel 4 , b. about 1671. See below. 
42 — Lydia 4 — b. Dec. 6, 1674, d. Ipswich 

Apr. 21, 1731, ae 56 years, 4 mos, 

15 days. 
43— Aaron 4 , b. Sept. 12, 1676. See below. 
44 — Eleazer 4 , b. Sept. 5. 1678. See below. 
45 — Abigail 4 , b.2[June?], 1680; m. Ipswich, 

May 13, 1701, Ephraim Warren, 
46— Daniel 4 , b. Apr. 4, 16S2. 
47— Mary 4 , b. Oct., 18, 1685. She was 

"Mary Burnam of Killingslee," 

Wyndham County, Conn, June 28, 
_ 1737. 
48 — James 4 . See below. 

Children, by second wife. Hester: — 

49— "Susana 4 ," b. Jan. 29, 1692-3. She 
m. (int. 12: 12 m. 1715) Daniel 
Corning of Beverly? 

50— Thomas 4 , b. Feb 12, 1694-5. See below. 

51— Benjamin 4 , b. Dec. 21, 1696. See be- 
low. 

52— Phebe 4 , b. Apr. 13, 1700, m. first, pub. 
May 1, 1725, John Adams, son of 
John and Hannah (Tread well) Ad- 
ams. He was born about 1700 and 
died Nov. 28, 1729. She m. second, 
pub May 12, 1732, Nathaniel Cross 
of Ipswich. 



12 



John Burnam 3 , son of Thomas and 
Mary Burnam, was born about 1650. 
He was a house carpenter or miller by 
trade. His father, with the consent of 



his mother, Mary, conveyed to him in 
1687 property at Chebacco "besides what 
faid Thomas hath given him in Mov- 
able Estate and what he ought to have 
paid for the improvement of the Saw 
mill Severall years past which Said 
Thomas hereby acquits him of the In- 
terest said Thomas hath in this houfe 
he dwells in at the Falls together with 
two six-acre lots about it, only Referving 
the priveledge for a Saw mill still there, 
for standing Damming flowing of water 
with free Egrefs, Ingrefs, and regret's 
to the Improvement of said mill or place 
for a mill for laying Timber, Logs & 
other benefitt which said Thomas or his 
heirs that he may see good to improve 
it by may make. Alfoe said Thomas 
confirms to Said John, Six acres of 
marsh by that ground which was Bay- 
brooks. He bought of said Bennett as 
alfo said Thomas privilege by grant of 
the town of Ipswich for building a Saw- 
mill near the Falls with the iron work 
of the saw mill by his house. All the 
said building, available pasture land, and 
meadow * * * with the appurtenances 
and rights in or on any ways appertain- 
ing to said Thomas." Thomas reserved 
"Liberty to get such firewood for him- 
felfe and his wife dureing Naturall life 
as himfelfe and wife shall see good to 
cut for themfelves in Cafes of necefsity 
which he is not to have the liberty of if 
John Supply him with wood to the 
Quantity of two Loads in one yeare 
yearly. Thomas and James, his brothers, 
doing the like." This was acknowledged 
by Thomas Burnam Senr and Mary, his 
wife, 22d May, 1693. [Essex Deeds 17: 
no.] 

"1687: John, son of Thomas Burnam 
(having raised the dam two feet higher, 
which was likely to damage the town 
very much &c &c) has liberty to move 



68 



THE MASSACHUSETTS MAGAZINE 



his mill on Chebacco river, but he is not 
to damnitie any former grant.'' He 
granted to his son John Burnam, Tertius, 
husbandman, ''one moiety or half of a 
saw mill upon the Chebacco river with 
one half of mill house, saws, iron dogs, 
sleds, dams, sluices, etc'' in March 
1695-6. 

February 2, 1699- 1700 he conveyed 
to his son, Thomas Burnam twelve acres 
of land" "lying in Ipswich — upon 
the head of Whitredge's Creek with 
a house, barn and half an orchard 
belonging to said land and also I 
gave to my son thirty acres of fresh 
meadow lying southward from the 
aforesaid land about half a mile 
measured, bounded and upon record, 
also I give to my aforesaid sonne 
Thomas Burnam ten acres of salt marsh 
lying betwixt Mr. Robert Crofs Sen. 
his farme and Shebacho river" ''said 
Thomas to pay £3 a year if it be legally 
demanded for myself and wife Eliza- 
beth." April 2J, 1703 he with the con- 
sent of his wife Elizabeth conveyed his 
property described as follows, his 
"homestead consisting of one dwelling 
house, out house, corn mill and forty 
acres of land with thirty acres of salt 
marsh on the left side of Chebacco 
river" to John Cogswell Sen, who be- 
came surety to Philip English of Salem. 
This was confirmed by his wife April 20, 
1705. ' The following document is re- 
corded bearing date April 4, 1704 : 
"whereas my son, Thomas Burnam, was 
obliged in his deed of that living he now 
pofsefses bearing date February y e 2, 
1699- 1 700 to pay to my husband John 
Burnam aforesaid his executors &c y e 
full sum of £30 in money and my son 
Thomas Burnham having paid y e same 
party to my said husband before his de- 
cease and y e remainder, fully paid and 



completed to me his executrix since his 

decease to my full satisfaction 1 

acquit my sd. son Thomas Burnam 

and release him." He married, Ipswich, 
June 9, 1669, Elizabeth Wells, daughter 
of Thomas and Abigail (Warner) Wells. 
He died in January, 1703-4. His will 
dated December 31, 1703, probated 
January 24, 1703-4, mentioned his wife, 
Elizabeth (appointed executrix) eldest 
son, John, second son Thomas, also 
sons Joseph, Jonathan and David and 
daughters Abigail and Mary. The last 
named, he called his youngest child. The 
inventory of his estate amounted to 
£644 105 :o6. His widow, Elizabeth, con- 
veyed to her sons Jonathan and David, 
both of Chebacco, about twenty-four 
acres of land in Chebacco with ''dwell- 
ing house, barn, sheep house, orchard 
and fences and common rights." It was 
bounded on land of Sarah and Jacob 
Burnham and near to the Cross farm in 
Chebacco also marsh land on Whit- 
redge's Creek. Also, 4-5 of a corn mill 
standing in Chebacco reserving privi- 
leges in the parlor room and chamber 
and cellar. Sept. 11, 171 1, she convey- 
ed to her daughter, Sarah, widow of her 
son John Burnam 3d, deceased, a pieceof 
land near the corn mill with dwelling 
house upon it, bounded by the land of 
Jacob Burnam and the . common lands 
of Ipswich. Also another lot bounded 
by the land of Jonathan and David 
Burnam. She died about February 17 18 
and letters of administration were grant- 
ed to her son Jonathan February 6 of 
that year. December 15, 1720 Jacob, 
Jonathan and David Burnam, carpenters 
of Ipswich sons of John released unto 
Thomas Burnham 4th. carpenter, title to 
a piece of salt marsh at Hog Island 
marsh in Chebacco containing about 16 
acres of land. 



FAMILY GENEALOGIES 



G9 



Children:— 

53— John 4 , b. Apr. 8, 1671. See below. 

54 — Thomas 1 , b. Sept. 22, 1673 See below. 

55 — Joseph 4 , mariner. He d. about April, 
1704, and his brother Jacob was ap- 
pointed administrator of his estate 
May 1, 1704. Inventory £50: 12 : 00. 

56 — Abigail 4 . 

The statement is made in the Burnham 
Genealogy that she married Xov. 17, 1699, 
Eben Whitman. The editor has found no 
evidence of this in the Ipswich records. Eb- 
• enezer 3 Whitman son of Thomas 2 (John 1 ) and 
Abigail (Byram) Whitman, of Bridgewater, 
married an Abigail Burnham. After Eben- 
ezer's death in 1713, at the age of 40, his 
widow married a Hobart of Hingham, with 
whom she lived on a farm in Bridgewater. 
This information is from the "John Whit- 
man" genealogy, but no evidenee is shown 
that she came from Ipswich. 

57 — Jacob 4 , b. about 16S2. See below. 

58 — Jonathan 4 , b. about 16S6. (Grave- 
stone, Essex.) See below. 

59— David 4 , b. about 1689. See below. 

60— Mary 4 . 

The compiler of the Burnam Genealogy 
states that she was the Mary Burnam whose 
marriage intention to Samuel Weymouth of 
Portsmouth was recorded in Ipswich, 10: 
10m: 1709. The editor has found no confirm- 
ation of this in the Essex County records and 
files. Roderick H. Burnham, in the above- 
mentioned genealogy, gives the dates of birth 
of several of the above children (Joseph, b. 
Sept. 20, 1678; Abigail, b. Dec. 10, 16S0; 
Jacob, b. Mar., 16S2; Jonathan, b. Oct. 10, 
16S5; David, b, Oct. 20, 1688 and Mary, 
b. June 30, 1691); and the date of birth 
and death of an earlier Jacob who died 
young (b. Mar. 1, 1676; d. Feb. 8, 16S2.) 
This lea Is the editor to think that Mr. Burn- 
ham may have had access to private re- 
cord?, which have not been accessible to the 
compilers of the Vital Records of Ipswich, 
recently printed. 



13 



James Burnam, 3 son of Lieut. 
Thomas and Mary Burnam, was born 
about 165 1. He was a carpenter and 
yoeman by occupation. He bought a 
house and twelve acres of land of 
George Giddings on the Argilla Road, 



Ipswich, June 3, 1667. He was a 
trooper in Major Appleton's Company 
in the Narrangansett campaign in the 
winter of 1675 anci was credited the 
amount of £4. His son, Thomas, later 
had a Narragansett grant (Xo. 1 Bux- 
ton) on the right of his father. He 
took the church covenant Jan. 25, 1678. 
He bought sixteen acres of land and 
dwelling of John Brown, Jan. 4, 1684. 
He was a witness in the witch trials in 
April, 1692. In the division of his fa- 
ther's estate, he had "the interest he 
hath in his now dwelling house on which 
said James liveth in, with 3.< acre about 
it and 14 acres upland and meadow near 
the homestead." This was in 1687. 
James had apparently built a new house 
before this date. Mr. Waters in his 
"Candlewood" page six, states that the 
above land is now owned by Carl 
Caverly. The house upon it was- built 
probably by James Burnam and may be 
the dwelling house which he occupied in 
1687 or the later house which he built in 

1/03- 

He conveyed to his son Thomas 
a "certain parcell of meadow upland & 
marsh ground with ye buildings with 
my old house, barn and shop with l / 2 
acre of land they stand on joyning to 
them my orchard as it is now fenced & 
bounded by Mr. Wade's land westerly 
& 6 acres of pasture land lying & joyn- 
ing to my house; pasturing of three 
cows and horse with my cows and 6 
acres of ploughing land as it is bounded 
by my pasture and by my brother 
Thomas Burnham & 4 acres of meadow 
out of my homestead at home & 6 acres 
of marsh out of my low marsh, ye said 
parent reserves y 2 ye apples, pears and 
plumbs of ye above orchard his life and 
no longer." [Essex Deeds 24-18, Sept. 
2 > l 7°2>'} J an - 2 5> l 7 l 9> ne conveyed to 



70 



THE MASSACHUSETTS MAGAZINE 



his son James Burnam Jr. "ye dwelling 
house I now live in together with ye 
Barns & all ye out housing and malt- 
house with ye land therunto belonging 
which he is to have and enjoy imme- 
diately after my and my wife's decease 
near my brother Lt. Thomas Burnam's 
land." He conveyed additional land to 
his son Thomas at this time. 

He was an overseer of the poor in 
1698. The following year he subscribed 
two dollars tow r ard the bell. He died 
June 30, 1729. In his will dated 
June 2J, he mentioned his sons Thomas 
and James, his daughters, Mary Tut- 
tle, Sarah Bill and Jemima (or Jo- 
anna in the accounts Essex Prob. Rec- 
ords 319-227) Dodge, grandaughters, 
Sarah and Anna Bill and grandson, 
Thomas Joshua Coffin. 

Children:— 

61— James 4 , b. May 12, 1677; d. May 19, 

1677. 
62— Mary 4 , b. Mav 5, 1678; m. March 22, 

1703, Charles Tuttle, son of Simon 



and Sarah (Cogswell) Tuttle. He 
was born March 31, 1679. 
63— James 4 , b. Nov. 1, 1679; d. Nov. 10, 

1679. 
64— Thomas 4 , b. June 27, 16S1. See below. 
60 — Sarah 4 , b. March 3, 1685; m. pub. 
June 5, 1708, Joshua Bill of Boston. 
He was the son of Joshua and Frances Bill. 
Her gravestone in the North Chelsea burying 
ground shows that she died April 24, 1731. 
66 — John 4 . See below. 
67 — Joanna 4 (or Jemima), b. March 18, 
1689; m. March 4. 1706, to Dan-' 
iel Dodge of Wenham, son of Rich- 
ard and Mary (Eaton) Dodge. He 
was born Apr. 26, 1677, graduated 
at Harvard college in 1700, and 
died Apr. 30, 1740. She married 
second, Captain Samuel Kimball who 
was born in Wenham August 19, 
1677. He was son of Ensign Samuel 
and Mary (Witt) Kimball. His will 
was proved February 3, 174.5-6. 
She married third, Captain Henry 
Herrick of Beverly, son of Captain 
Joseph and Mary Herrick. He was 
born September 9, 1688. She was 
his third wife. She died in 1767. 
68— James 4 , b. Jan. 30, 1691. See below. 
69— Joshua 4 , b. Apr 19, 1694; d. Dec. 22, 
1708, ae 15 years. 



(To be continued.) 



0urEft!lanaT l^ar^^r 



R ev: Thomas JEraj&klin Waters. 



THE common schools of our Common- 
wealth are our peculiar pride and 
joy. With infinite pains, the most 
skilful educators are studying to keep them 
abreast of the most modern methods and 
to secure through them the symmetrical 
and perfect development of the minds of 
our children. Comparing them as they are 
to-day, with the schools of fifty, forty or 
thirty years ago, we are impressed with 
the great gain in the breadth of the school 
curriculum and the exceedingly practical 
way of teaching very valuable truths. Lan- 
guage study has attained deserved promi- 
nence, and the child of twelve or thirteen 
has already been practised in letter writing 
and simple descriptive composition and has 
become familiar with some of the best 
specimens of our English or American lit- 
erature. Exercises in music and drawing 
vary the monotony of school-work and 
foster a taste for artistic accomplishments. 
The rules of hygiene are taught, eyes and 
ears are inspected by medical experts, and 
wise frugality and thrift are encouraged by 
the penny savings system. In the higher 
schools, practical business training is being 
taught and even the amateur use of tools 
in the mechanic arts. 

BUT in the teaching of history, in our 
judgment, much remains to be done. 
In our own school days in Salem, 
American history was taught out of a book, 
and after hard cramming, the diligent 
scholar was able to repeat after some years 
in parrot-like fashion the story of the dis- 
covery of America, the coming of the 
Pilgrim Fathers, the battles of the Revolu- 



tionary War and the names of the Presi- 
dents. Every day we saw the tall liberty- 
pole that marked the spot of Leslie's re- 
treat, but never a word was spoken to rouse 
boyish enthusiasm by telling the story of 
that exciting episode. No teacher ever 
told of the stirring days on Winter Island, 
nor explained patiently and lucidly the 
meaning of the witch-craft delusion. Some 
delightful bits of Hawthorne's tales had 
strayed into the Readers, then in vogue, 
and were read with quivering eagerness, 
but Hawthorne himself, and the localities 
that were so dear to him, remained as 
vague and unreal as the man in the moon. 
The history of our own town, so varied, 
wonderful and inspiring, was a sealed book. 

WE may not be well-informed as to the 
latest modern methods of history 
teaching, but we have measurable 
acquaintance with the text-books studied 
and the requirements made, and we have 
yet to learn that the history of the things 
near at hand has attained its rightful place. 
Children are not taught about their own 
town and the manner of life of earlier 
days. History is still a matter of dates 
and events, which must be held in memory 
with a vice-like grasp, without natural co- 
herence and without pleasure. Naturally 
the study of history is branded as dry and 
uninteresting. 

But history has to do with the men and 
women who invaded a wilderness, built 
their humble homes, and lived the hard life 
of pioneers in the place where we live. 
Why did they come, where did they live, 
what was the style of their houses, their 



72 



THE MASSACHUSETTS MAGAZINE 



food, their dress? In an age which ante- 
dated the application of steam and elec- 
tricity, in which the human hand had the 
help of only the simplest tools, how was 
the food of the family and its clothing, 
and the lighting and warming of the home 
provided? 

The life of the week-day and the Sab- 
bath day, the peril from Indian attack, the 
early enthusiasm for education, the ancient 
industries, now forgotten, the heroism and 
hardship of war as revealed in the annals 
of the town, or in the old letters, which the 
great-grandfathers of people now living, 
wrote from Valley Forge, the story of the 
old house that still stands, made venerable 
and beautiful by the memories of the love 
and toil, the sorrow and the joy of gen- 
erations, are themes that interest and de- 
light. These are the object lessons which 
appeal to eye and ear, to heart and mind 
alike. 

But the teacher, not a native of the town 
and unfamiliar with its history, burdened 
already with novel methods, and with care 
for the physical well-being as well as the 
intellectual of half a hundred pupils, may 
reasonably demur at the bare thought of 
such excursions as these into the field of 
local history. Modern methods are equal 
to such emergencies. The committees of 
woman's clubs are co-operating devotedly 



and helpfully in the penny-savings, in the 
providing of lunches, in securing play- 
grounds. The town physician has his eye 
to physical weaknesses. The art and music 
teachers come from without. 



IS there not an historical student or an 
historical society ready to be invited 
to step in and illumine the field of his- 
tory? Some lover of historic lore, full of 
generous enthusiasm, whose very presence 
breathes the fine aroma of the past, skilful 
at story-telling and wholly unmercenary, 
would be glad to open up his or her treas- 
ures to young and inquiring minds. The 
historical society, if the request were made, 
would gladly open its doors and welcome 
a school and its teacher. Gathered around 
the great fireplace, the old family indus- 
tries, candle-making, cheese-making, spin- 
ning and weaving, the running of bullets 
and the myriad other occupations of 
ancient homes would be intensely real. The 
talk of men and things of other days under 
such circumstances is vastly more enter- 
taining than the memorizing of books. 
Through such an avenue, the approach to 
the broad field of history in general is 
natural and easy, and the child, no longer 
a laggard, may advance joyfully into a life- 
long delight in this fascinating realm. 



inL 



MASSACHVSETTS 
MAGAZINE 




^JofeD>fo.(na5sac^usctt5*Hisforij«Ccn£alo9i}-'6iogrftp()il 
Published by the Salem Press Co. Salem, Mass. USA 



A Quarterly cTVlagazine Devoted to History, Genealogy and Biography" 1 
Thomas Franklin Water?, Editor, ipswich, mass. 

ASSOCIATE AXD ADVISORY EDITORS 

Thomas Wextworth Higginson, George Sheldon, Dr. Frank A. Gardner, 

CAMBRIDGE, MASS. DEEKFI ELI>. M ASS. SALEM, M^- 

Lucie M. Gardner, Charles A. Flagg, John X. McClixtock, Albert W Dexxis, 

SALEM, MASS. WASHINGTON, D. C. - DORCHESTER, MASS. SALEM, Ml--. 

Issued in January, April, July and October. Subscription, $2.50 per year, Single copies, 75c 
VOL. IV APRIL, 191 1 NO. 2 

(Cmtfcnis of fljtts Jssut. 



Poe's Place in American Literary History 

R. A. Douglas- Lithgow, M.D., LL.D. . 75 

Colonel Ruggles Woodbridge's Regiment F. A.Gardner, M.D. . S2 

The Dorothy Quixcy Homestead . Arthur Boardman dishing . 96 

Massachusetts in Literature Charles A. Flagg . 99 

The Old Warren House Francis R. Stoddard, Jr. . 105 

Department of the American Revolution F. A. Gardner, M.D. . 110 

Family Genealogies Lucie M. Gardner . 119 

Massachusetts Pioneers in Michigan . . . Charles A. Flagg . 128 

Criticism and Comment 132 

Our Editorial Pages Thomas F. Waters . 135 



CORRESPONDENCE of a business nature should be sent to The Massachusetts Magazine, Salem, Mass. 

CORRESPONDENCE in regard to contributions to the Magazine may be sent to the editor, Rev. T. F. 
Waters, Ipswich, Mas?., or to the office of publication in Salem. 

BOOKS for review may be sent to the office of publication in Salem. Books should not be sent to individual 
editors of the Magazine", unless by previous correspondence the editor consents to review the book. 

SUBSCRIPTIONS should be sent to The Massachusetts Magazine. Salem, Mass. Subscriptions are $2.50 
payable in advance, post paid to any address in the United Stat :S or Canada. To foreign countries in the 
Postal Union, 62.75. Single copies of back numbers, 75 cents each. 

REMITTANCES may be made in currency or two cent postage stamps; many subscriptions are sent through 
the mail in this way, and they are seldom'lost, but such remittances must be at the risk of the sender. To 
avoid all danger of loss send by post-otfice money order, bank check, or express money order. 

CHANGES OF ADDRESS. When a subscriber makes a change of address, he should notify the publishers, 
giving both his old and new addresses. The publishers cannot be responsible for lost copies, if they are not 
notified of such changes. 

ON SALE. Copies of this magazine are on sale in Boston, at W. B. Clark's & Co., 20 Tremont Street, Old 
Corner Book Store. 29 Bromfleld Street, Geo. E. Littletield, 67 Cornhill, Smith 4 t McCance, 3S Bromfield Mreet; 
in Xew York, at John Wanamaker'?, IJ toad wav, 4th, 9th and 10th Streets; in Philadelphia, Am. Baptist Pub. 
Societv, 1630 Chestnut Street; in Washington, at Brentanos, F & 13th St.; in Chicago, at A. C. McClurg's & Co.. 
221 Wabash Ave.; in London, at B. F. Stevens & Brown, 4 Trafalgar Sq. Also on sale at principal stands of 
N. E. News Co. 

Entered as second-class matter March 13, 1008, at the post office at Salem, Mass., under the act of Congress 
of March 3, 1879. Office of publication, 300 Essex Street, Salem, Mass. 



POE'S PLACE IN AMERICAN 
LITERARY HISTORY 



By R. A. Douglas-Lithgow, M.D., LL.D. 

Author of "The Individuality of Edgar Allen Poe." 




MERICAN Literature had no childhood, and its history 
does not begin until the people of the New World had T 
during generations, reached years of maturity, although 
early memories of an ancient cultured land were latent 
within them. The pioneers of civilization in North 
America, and their successors, during many years, were 
too strenuously occupied with hard work and suffering to even think of 
Art in any of its varied forms ; and as Art can only bloom and flourish 
as the result of the accumulation of past experience, it was not until 
phenomenal physical labor and the associated forces of human energy 
had cleared the land, tilled the soil, rendered possession safe and resi- 
dence secure, — not, indeed, until concentrated toil had borne fruit in 
the establishment of communal consolidation, and the teeming resources 
of Nature had enabled a rapidly-increasing community to survey their 
environment with assured confidence and hopefulness, that the seeds 
of literary art were sparsely planted amongst them. 

Records of novel experiences formed the first, if lowly blossomings, as 
recognized in the Relations and Histories of Smith, Bradford, Winthrop,. 
the Mathers and Bradstreet during the Colonial period, and of Woolman, 
Jonathan Edwards, and their more illustrious contemporary, Benjamin 
Franklin, in the 18th century, — the latter excelling all in style and 



76 THE MASSACHUSETTS MAGAZINE 

literary spirit in his "Autobiography." Passing over the lighter and 
more musical notes of Freneau and Hopkinson, still later, in the Revolu- 
tionary period, Madison, Hamilton, Jefferson and others combined their 
religio-political views and aims in stalwart prose, but without recognition 
of the higher literary forms of Art included in Poetry, Belles-lettres, etc. 

It was not, however, until the first quarter of the 19th century when 
Bryant published his " Thanatopsis n (in 1816), and Washington Irving 
{in 1819), published his "Sketch-Book," that American literature had its 
real beginning, and the day of puling rhymesters and ponderous pedantic 
essayists was over. From this time forward the literary field of America 
"became more highly cultured and dulv yielded richer fruit. Bryant and 
Irving were the first two stars to appear in the firmament of American 
literature; they were, indeed, the morning-stars which heralded the 
"Elizabethan era" of American Letters with its gleaming galaxy, — the 
radiant constellation which illumed the 19th century. The names of 
Bryant, Longfellow, Emerson, Whittier, Holmes, Lowell, Hawthorne, 
and Walt Whitman diffused their light not only over east, west, north and 
south of the New World, but gladdened the hearts of millions throughout 
the hearths and homes of the Old. 

With these shining lights, but not of them, came one lone but brilliant 
star, of "purest ray serene," — the intensity of whose light waxed with the 
flight of time until, still solitary in the heavens, it shone, like a full-orbed 
planet, over many lands. 

Though the light of Edgar Allen Poe has ceased to burn forever, the 
lustre of his fame has become immortal. 

Mr. Hamilton Wright Mabie says*: — "It is the first, and perhaps the 
most obvious distinction of Edgar Allen Poe that his creative work baffles 
all attempts to relate it historically to antecedent conditions ; that it de- 
tached itself almost completely from the time and place in which it made 
its appearance, and sprang suddenly and mysteriously from a soil which 
had never known its like before." This is, indeed, true, for of his distin- 
guished colleagues he is the only one that stands absolutely alone and 
unaffected by the prior developmental and historical experiences of his 
native land. The tang of Puritanism pervades the writings not only of 

♦Atlantic Monthly, December, 1899. 



POE'S PLACE IN AMERICAN LITERARY HISTORY 77 

his predecessors but of his contemporaries, but there is no Puritanic tinct- 
ure in anything that Poe has written. However, his contemporaries are 
differentiated from each other in outlook and purview, in aim and per- 
spective, in insight and intensity, in thought and expression, Poe was 
yet different from all in every aspect of his individuality , — an anachron- 
ism, — "out of place, out of time," — sui. generis , — like an exotic flower 
mysteriously transplanted into an alien and inimical environment, detached 
and isolated. 

He was in no sense deliberately interested either in the formative devel- 
opment or fluxing conditions of his life-period or its antecedents, and it 
was the potentiality of his individual force rather than the inspiration of 
contemporaneous thought which guided and impelled him in all the work 
he accomplished. While he learned little, if anything from men, and 
his experience of the world was extremely limited, he was ever an un- 
wearying student not only of belles-lettres, but of 

"Many a quaint and curious volume of forgotten lore;" 

and it was thus, and thus only, that his practical disseverance from life can 
be accounted for. The supreme passion of his soul was Beauty, especially 
in relation to perfect Art, and while he ever worshipped Beauty and Art as 
his genius interpreted them, he made the attainment of perfect art the sole 
and only object and ambition of his life. So strongly did the artistic 
spirit pervade his nature that he sought but to interpret what she inspired. 
There is not another figure in ail literature who shines forth with such 
loyal devotion to the mistress his soui adored, nor one who exercised such 
uncompromising singleness of purpose in the realisation of her behests. 

Poe's advent into- American literature was as wonderful as the influence 
he exerted upon it, and as he had no precursor he left no successor. He 
was unique in every aspect of his personality, — in his temperament, his 
manner, and his appearance, as in the constitution of his mind, and the 
idiosyncratic fertility of his genius. Throughout his ill-starred life he re- 
mained uninfluenced by anything save his own individuality, and neither 
the appalling aud unparallelled environment amid which his life was spent, 
nor the hereditary weakness of his character, — for which he was not re- 
sponsible, — left a stain or a flaw in the inimitable- work he wrought. He 
was essentially individualistic not only in his genius but in his work, and 



- 






78 THE MASSACHUSETTS MAGAZINE 

all the concentrated force of his personality was expended mainly in sub- 
jective idealism, and the perfection of form in art. His imagination. — 
frequently tinctured with gloom, as if a reflection from the isolation of his 
life, — was as pure and vivid as a flash of lightning, and the distinctive 
perfection of his artistry has never been excelled. He was, perhaps, the 
daintiest and most painstaking literary artist in any literature, and all his 
work is remarkable for supersensitiveness and delicacy of touch, — aglow 
with the soul of the perfect artist's creative impulse. Within its limitations 
his genius is perfect of its kind, and always individualistic, whether ex- 
pressed in poetry or prose, and the magic of his art is incomparable in 
both. 

This paper is not intended as either biographical or critical, but merelv 
seeks to estimate Poe's place in American Literary History bv a brief con- 
sideration of the character of his work, and of what he accomplished as a 
litterateur. His genius was so many-sided that it is difficult within the 
space at my disposal, to do anything like justice to the theme ; but a brief 
reference to w r hat is considered as his best work, and a comparison with 
the work of other American authors is as much as can be compassed within 
present limits. 

Whether w r e consider Poe as a poet or a prose-writer he is distinguished 
in both capacities. As a poet the mass of his contributions is compara- 
tively small, but within it are poems which the world will not willinglv 
let die. Who has not enjoyed the melody of "The Bells," and the mel- 
ancholy of "The Raven"? But in "To Helen," "Israfel," " The City 
of the Sea," "The Sleeper,", "The Valley of Unrest," "The Conqueror 
Worm," and "The Haunted Palace,", — to say nothing of "Ulalume" and 
"Annabel Lee," — with their perfection of rhythm, their mellifluousness, 
their originality, and their undefinable mystery, the world acknowledges 
their author as among the masters of pure song. 

In his prose tales Poe turns, often instinctively, as best harmonizing 
with his temperament, to the bizarre and mysterious aspects of life and 
experience, — the gloomy, the grim and the horrible; and here again he 
is differentiated from the writers of his time, and, as usual, individualistic. 
<f Ligeia," "The Fall of the House of Usher," "The Pit and the Pendu- 
lum" will be found sufficiently representative of this class. In such tales 



POE'S PLACE IN AMERICAN LITERARY HISTORY 70 

as "The Murders in the Rue Morgue," "The Mystery of Marie Roget," 
f, The Purloined Letter," and "The Gold Bug," the processes of acute and 
concentrated reasoning are powerfully represented; and in "The Black 
Cat," "The Tell-Tale Heart," " William Wilson" and "The Man of the 
Crowd," problems of ethics or morality are involved and illustrated ; while. 
as appertaining to the borderland between Science and Imagination, may 
be mentioned "The Case of M. Valdemar," "The MS. Found in a Bot- 
tle," and "The Balloon Hoax." These examples are generally esteemed 
as including Poe's best prose work, and in perspicuity of thought, con- 
structive power, and progressive activity are masterpieces of literary art, 
while in imaginative force, and analytical acumen they are incomparable 
in any literature. 

But Poe was more than a poet and a prose-writer, for he was the most 
accomplished critic ever produced in America ; as well as the ablest and 
most distinguished American editor, — apparent from the fact that, — as far 
back as 1840, he raised the circulation of a magazine with which he was 
editorially connected from 5,000 to 50,000 copies, in two years. 

Above all, however, Poe is unique in the individuality of his work, in 
the exquisite artistry of his workmanship, in the virgin chastity of his 
art, and in the " ideal vision — incarnate or nebulous — of pure beauty" 
which ever floated before his mind, and which sustained him to the end. 

With whom shall I compare him in American literature? Not with 
Hawthorne whose power was also creative, but whose mind was saturated 
with the problems of Puritan life, and who lacked Poe's versatility and 
vivid imagination, while his temperament and character were in antithesis 
to those of Poe. 

Emerson had no sympathy with Poe, and called him "a jingle man," 
because, it may be assumed, Poe was too original for him ; but, as a lor- 
cible modern writer says, — i4 While most of the doctrine of Emerson may 
be found elsewhere from Plato to Browning, Poe is unique." 

Longfellow had little in common with Poe but differed from him in toto 
by the universality of his sympathies, and in being loved by everybody, 
while the ever-varying grace and melody of his versification are so blent 
with the picturesque in Nature that his poetry touches and thrills every 
human heart with gladness. Longfellow estimated Poe's genius highly 



80 THE MASSACHUSETTS MAGAZINE 

although the latter had injudiciously and undeservedly assailed the integ- 
rity of the elder poet, — perhaps the only stain on his escutcheon as a critic. 

While Lowell was altogether more robust than Poe in his attainments, 
he lacked the lyrical grace and ideality of Poe, in his poetry, as well as 
the artistic style and finish of his prose. 

Bryant resembles Poe in his lack of human sympathy, but in no other 
respect; while Holmes, although strongly individualistic, like Poe, differs 
from him entirely in genial pervasive humour, and in his alternating ten- 
derness of delicate feeling with mirthful satire. 

Walt Whitman, with his rough poetic soul, had neither the apprecia- 
tion of rhythmic form, nor the power to express what he felt, in the terms 
of poetry, so that there was but little affinity between him and Poe. There 
still remains J. Greenleaf Whittier, but it is needless to institute a com- 
parison between two poets so diametrically opposed in creative force and 
sublimity of expression, in ideation and constructive power, and in artistic 
appreciation and workmanship. 

Poe is, indeed, incomparable with any of his contemporaries in Amer- 
ican Literary History; for he is uniquely personal, isolated, and unpar- 
allelled in every aspect of his individuality. 

What place does he occupy in the Literary History of America? The 
estimate can only be briefly summarized here. 

He was the first to introduce the short story into American literature, 
and of their kind, and so far as their limitations extend, his poems and 
tales are acknowledged by the world as master-pieces, unparallelled, and 
unsurpassed in literary art. 

He was a consistent and uncompromising apostle of "Art for Art's 
sake." 

As a literary artist his work has never been equalled or excelled in 
American literature. 

He introduced into x\merica the highest form and purest type of inde- 
pendent literary criticism ever known between the two great oceans, and 
no more competent or accomplished editor ever sat in an American edito- 
rial chair ; moreover, he upheld the standard of pure literature and pure 
art even amid the terrible circumstances of his unfortunate life, from first 
to last. 



POE'S PLACE IN AMERICAN LITERARY HISTORY SI 

I, therefore, unhesitatingly claim for him the supremest genius which 
has shone over American fields and the highest place in the Literary 
History of his country. 

His countrymen may not yet approve this estimate, but it has been 
generously and deservedly accorded by the other nations of the world ; 
and the time is assuredly coming when Americans shall honour the work 
of Poe as that of her most gifted son. 



■ ' 



[This is the second half of the tenth of a series of articles, giving the organization and history of all the 
Massachusetts regiments which took part in the war of the Revoluti n.] 

COL. RUGGLES WOODBRIDGE'S 

REGIMENT 



By Frank A. Gardner, M. D. 



(Concluded.) 



CAPTAIN JOSEPH FOSTER of Ware may have been the man of 
that name who was in Captain James Johnson's Company, Colonel Timothy 
Ruggles's Regiment, the name appearing on an order dated Northampton, May 
31, 1758. He was Captain of a Company of Minute Men in Colonel Wood- 
bridge's Regiment, April 20, 1775. He left the place of rendezvous May 15, 
1775, service 25 days. 

CAPTAIN THOMAS WAITE FOSTER of Hadley may have been 
the " Thomas Foster," son of Jonathan and Mary Foster, who was born 
Shrewsbury, September 2, 1726, and enlisted April 2, 1759, in Colonel Abraham 
Williams's Regiment and served until November 29, 1759. He was Captain 
of a " Trane of Artelery in Coll Ruggles Woodbridge's Regiment," according 
to a roll dated April 25, 1775. Another muster roll dated August 1, 1775, 
states that he was engaged April 19, 1775, as Captain of a Company in Colonel 
Richard Gridley's Artillery Regiment and served until October and probably 
through the year. A man of the same name served as Gunner on the ship 
" Warren " on the Penobscot expedition in 1779. 

CAPTAIN DANIEL GALLUSHA (or GALEUCIA) of Lynn was 
born in Norton, August 1, 1740. May 12, 1775, he was engaged as Lieutenant 
in Captain Eleazer Lindsey's Company, in Colonel Woodbridge's Regiment. 
His name appears as Lieutenant in Captain Eleazer Lindsey's Company, 
Colonel Samuel Gerrish's Regiment, in a return dated July 21, 1775. Henry 
Hallowell in his narrative wrote: " The same summer Capt. Lindsey, of Lynn, 
was broke for misconduct — him that was called ' money maker Lindsey ' — 
and Daniel Galeucia his Lieut, took command as Captain." In a return made 
probably in Occtober, 1775, his name appears as Captain of the 10th Company 
in Colonel Woodbridge's 25th Regiment. (See Historical section of this ar- 



COLONEL RUGGLES WOODBRIDGE'S REGIMENT S3 

tide). He lived in Lynn on the land now owned by John L. Shorey. Howard 
K. Saunderson, in his excellent work, " Lynn in the Revolution," gave the 
following account of him : " Those who remembered him in his latter years 
described him as a tall fine looking man though somewhat bent, with white 
hair which fell over his shoulders. At the age of seventy-five he hung him- 
self in the old barn, but was discovered before it was too late. Upon recov- 
ering consciousness, he is said to have asked for water arid to have remarked, 
' I believe now I shall live out my appointed time.' His final resting place 
is Cedar Grove Cemetery, South Peabody, where an S. A. R. marker has 
been placed by the Peabody Historical Society." He died in Lynn, December 
9, 1825, aged over 85. 

CAPTAIN EBENEZER GOODALE, whose place of residence is given 
in the " Massachusetts Soldiers and Sailors of the Revolutionary War " as 
probably New Salem, may have been the man of that name who was born 
in Marlboro, in 1739, the son of Enos and Mary (Angier) Goodale. This 
couple afterwards moved to Shrewsbury, and their son Ebenezer was a pri- 
vate in Captain Artemas Ward's Company, March 28, 1757. The subject 
of this sketch commanded a company of Minute Men in Colonel Woodbridge's 
Regiment on the Lexington alarm of April 19, 1775. He probably was the 
man of that name who was Captain in Lieut. -Colonel Samuel William's Regi- 
ment from July 11, to August 12, 1777; and Captain in Colonel David Wells's 
Regiment from September 12, to October 18, 1777, " service in the Northern 
Army." 

CAPTAIN JOSEPH HOOKER, of Greenwich, was the son of Joseph 
and Jane (Rankin) Hooker. He was born in Littleton, in 1733. He went 
to the French war in 1755, at the age of 22. He resided in Westford in 
1763, and was at Greenwich in 1765. He lived in the part of the town which 
is now Enfield. He was Captain of a company of Minute Men in Colonel 
Woodbridge's Regiment which marched on the Lexington alarm of April 
19, 1775, and served 21 days. In December, 1775, he served as First Lieuten- 
ant in Captain Elijah D wight's Company, Colonel Woodbridge's Regiment. 
April 1, 1776, he was commissioned Captain in Colonel Samuel Howe's 4th 
Hampshire County Regiment. From December 15, 1776, to March 18, 1777, 
he was Captain in Lieut.-Colonel Samuel Williams's Regiment. He was en- 
gaged August 13, 1777, as Captain in Colonel Woodbridge's Regiment in the 
Northern Army and served until November 29, 1777. He made returns as 



84 THE MASSACHUSETTS MAGAZINE 

Captain, March 30, 1779, of men from Greenwich in the Continental Army. 
June 29, 1780, he was commissioned Captain of the 11th Company. Colonel 
Elisha Porter's 4th Hampshire County Regiment. Major-General Joseph 
Hooker of the Union Army in the Civil War was his grandson. 

CAPTAIN JOHN KING, of New Salem, was probably the man of 
that name who resided in Palmer in 1758, and was Ensign of Captain Daniel 
Burt's Company, Colonel William Williams's Regiment, from March 13, to 
November 4, 1758. This John King, of Palmer, was also Lieutenant in 
Captain Nathan Benjamin's Company, Colonel John Ashley's South Berk- 
shire Regiment in July, 1771. John King, of New Salem, was a Ser- 
geant in Captain Ebenezer Goodale's Company of Minute Men, in Colonel 
Woodbridge's Regiment on the Lexington alarm of April 19, 1775. April 
26th he was engaged to serve in the same rank in Captain Meacham's 
Company, in Colonel Woodbridge's Regiment in the Provincial Army, and 
after his Captain was killed at Bunker Hill, June 17, 1775, he was promoted 
Captain. He served through the year. The roll of this company has been 
published in the New England Historic-Genealogical Register, v. LXIN, 
p. 206-7. 

CAPTAIN NOAHDIAH LEONARD, of Sunderland, was the son of 
Samuel Leonard, and was born in West Springfield, September 10, 1737. 
He was in Sunderland as early as 1755, and from September 15, to December 
20 of that year was a member of Captain Lyman's Company, Captain Seth 
Pomeroy's Regiment. While in camp at Lake George, November 21, 1755, 
he was reported " sick." He kept a tavern for many years in the house 
which, in 1899, was owned by Mrs. Abigail Gilbert. He was Captain of a 
company in Colonel Woodbridge's Regiment, on the Lexington alarm of 
April 19, 1775. Eight days later he was engaged for service in Colonel 
Woodbridge's Regiment in the Provincial Army, and continued under that 
ofhecr through the year. After the war he served as Lieut. -Colonel of 
militia. He died April 26, 1790. 

CAPTAIN ELEAZER LINDSEY of Lynn. His connection with this 
regiment has been reviewed in the historical section of this article. As most 
of his service in 1775 was in Colonel Gerrish's Regiment, and he was a mem- 
ber of that organization when he was dismissed, his biographical sketch will 
be given in the article upon that regiment. 



COLONEL RUGGLES WOODBRIDGE'S REGIMENT 85 

CAPTAIN WILLIAM MEACHAM, of New Salem, served in Canada 
in 1758, in Captain Selah Barnard's Company, Colonel William Williams's 
Regiment. April 6, 1759, he was impressed for service to the " westward,'' 
in Captain Selah Barnard's Company, Brigadier-General Ruggles's Regiment. 
At that time his age was given as 18. He was engaged as Captain in Colonel 
Woodbridge's Regiment, May 11, 1775, and served until June 11, 1775, when 
he was killed in the battle of Bunker Hill. 



CAPTAIN MOSES MONTAGUE, of South Hadley, was born in that 
town November 17, 1724. He was the son of Peter and Mary (Hubbard) 
Montague. He was a Constable in South Hadley, in 1753. He served as 
Corporal in Captain Samuel Smith's Company, which marched from that 
town August 9, 1757. Upon the Lexington alarm of April 19, 1775, he 
marched as Captain of a Company of Minute Men in Colonel Woodbridge's 
Regiment. May 28, 1778, he was commissioned Captain in Colonel Elisha 
Porter's 4th Hampshire County Regiment. In the following year he held 
the same rank in Colonel Israel Chapin's 2nd Hampshire County Regiment, 
from October 13, to November 21, 1779. During the revolutionary period 
he served on five of the patriotic committees. He died October 17, 1810. 

CAPTAIN SETH MURRx\Y, of Hatfield, marched in 1757, to the 
relief of Fort William Henry, in Lieutenant Joseph Billing's Company, Colonel 
Israel Williams's Regiment. In 1759, he served from April 25 to December 
6 in the same regiment against Canada. His age at that time was given 
as 22. Upon the Lexington alarm of April 19, 1775, he marched as Lieutenant 
of Captain Perez Graves's Hatfield Company. Five days later he was en- 
gaged as Captain in Colonel Woodbridge's Regiment in the Provincial Army, 
and his commission was ordered June 21st. March 22, 1776, he was engaged 
as Captain in Colonel Seth Pomeroy's 2nd Hampshire County Regiment. 
From July 9 to August 17, 1777, he served in the same regiment under Major 
Jonathan Clap, in an expedition to Fort Edward and Mosses Creek. From 
September 20 to October 14, 1777, he was Captain in Colonel Ezra May's 
2nd Hampshire County Regiment. October 12, 1777, he was engaged as 
Major of Colonel Israel Chapin's 2nd Hampshire County Regiment, and 
served until November 21, 1779. July 8, 1780, he was commissioned Lieu- 
tenant-Colonel of that regiment, and shortly after was promoted to the rank 
of Colonel. He served until November 10, 1780. 



86 THE MASSACHUSETTS MAGAZINE 

CAPTAIN STEPHEN PEARL, of Lenox, was engaged as Captain 
in Colonel Woodbridge's Provincial Regiment, May 8, 1775, and served 
through the year under that commander. January 1, 1777, he was appointed 
Adjutant of Colonel Joseph Yose's 1st Regiment Massachusetts Line, serving 
until January 12, 1778, when he resigned. 

CAPTAIN LEMUEL TRESCOTT, of Boston. A return dated June 
14, 1775, gives Captain Trescott's Company as in Colonel Woodbridge's Regi- 
ment. A muster roll, dated August 1, 1775, credits this company to Colonel 
Jonathan Brewer's Regiment, engaged May 10, 1775. The sketches of its 
officers will therefore be given in the history of the latter regiment. 

CAPTAIN NATHAN WHEELER. An officer bearing this name was 
credited to Colonel Woodbridge's Regiment, June 16, 177o, but the name 
was crossed out. Ensign Nathan Wheeler, of Royalston, was in Colonel 
John Nixon's 5th Regiment Army of the United Colonies, and his biographical 
sketch will be found in the history of that regiment. 

FIRST LIEUTENANT ZACCHEUS CROCKER, of Shutesbury, was 
an Ensign in Captain Nathaniel Dwight's Company on the Crown Point ex- 
pedition from September 10, to December 10, 1755. He held the same rank 
in Lieutenant Jonathan Dickenson's Company, Colonel Israel Williams's Regi- 
ment, w r hich marched to the relief of Fort William Henry, in 1757. He was 
First Lieutenant of Captain Reuben Dickinson's Company of Minute Men, 
in Colonel W T oodbridge's Regiment, which responded to the Lexington alarm 
of April 19, 1775. May 1, he was engaged to serve in the same company 
in the Provincial Army. May 6, 1776, he was commissioned Captain of 
the 3d Company in Colonel Phineas Wright's 6th Hampshire County Regi- 
ment. He also served as Captain in the same regiment from July 12 to 29, 
1777, in the Northern Army. He served as First Lieutenant of Captain 
Agrippa Wells Company, Colonel Samuel Brewer's Regiment, for three months 
at Ticonderoga from September 1, 1776. 

FIRST LIEUTENANT WILLIAM GILMER (GILMORE) was a 
sentinel in Captain Robert Lothridge's Company, Colonel Israel Williams's 
Regiment, which marched to the relief of Fort William Henry in 1757. He 
was Lieutenant in Captain Joseph Foster's Company of Minute Men, in 
Colonel Woodbridge's Regiment, which marched on the Lexington alarm 
of April 19, 1775. He probably was the William " Gilmor " of Ware, who 



COLONEL RUGGLES WOODBRIDGE'S REGIMENT 87 

was Lieutenant in Captain Jonathan Bardwell's Company, Colonel David 
Brewer's 9th Regiment, Army of the United Colonies, later in 1775. 

FIRST LIEUTENANT ITHAMAR GOODENOUGH, of Guilford, 
" enlisted " May 12, 1775, as Lieutenant in Captain Ichabod Dexter's Com- 
pany, Colonel Woodbridge's Regiment, and served through the year. He 
may have been the man of that name who resided in Holden in 1759, and 
was a private in Captain Aaron Frye's Company from May 4 to Novem- 
ber 2, 1759. 

FIRST LIEUTENANT ISAAC GRAY, of Pelham, was a Sergeant 
in Captain Robert Lotheridge's Company, Colonel Israel Williams's Regi- 
ment, which marched to the relief of Fort William Henry, 1757. He held 
many offices in Pelham, including that of hogreeve in 1757, surveyor in 1760, 
deerreeve in 1761, and selectman in 1762. He was alotted a pew in the 
Pelham church in 1766. He served as Lieutenant in Captain Joseph Hooker's 
Company of Minute Men in Colonel Woodbridge's Regiment, on the Lexing- 
ton alarm of April 19, 1775. May 1, 1775, he was engaged as Captain in 
Colonel Jonathan Brewer's 19th Regiment in the Provincial Army. After 
the reorganization in July he served in the same rank under the same com- 
mander in the 6th Regiment, Army of the United Colonies. He is on record 
as " Captain serving as volunteer," in Captain John Thompson's Company, 
Colonel Elisha Porter's 4th Hampshire County Regiment, September 23-29, 
1777. Service with the Northern Army. He was a member of the Com- 
mittee of Safety in Pelham and Moderator of the town meeting in 1780. He 
served as Selectman again in 1782 and died in September, 1786, in his 
57th year. 

FIRST LIEUTENANT JOSIAH OSGOOD, of New Salem (probably), 
was Lieutenant of Captain Ebenezer Goodale's Company of Minute Men 
in Colonel Woodbridge's Regiment on the Lexington alarm, April 19, 1775. 
He served as Second Lieutenant in Captain Samuel Merriam's Company, 
Colonel's Israel Chapin's 2nd Hampshire County Regiment from October 
15 to November 21, 1779. 

LIEUTENANT DANIEL PILLSBURY of Newbury, entered Captain 
William Rogers's Company, Colonel Samuel Gerrish's Regiment as drummer 
April 9, 1775. He served in that organization on the Lexington alarm of 
April 19, 1775, and April 27th enlisted under the same officers in the Pro- 






■#-v - 



88 THE MASSACHUSETTS MAGAZINE 

vincial Army. He continued to serve under Captain Rogers until September 
11, when he was discharged " as an opportunity was offered him of serving 
in the capacity of Lieutenant in another regiment and as he had agreed to 
supply another man in his stead to serve in Captain Rogers's Co." His 
name appears on a list which may be found in the first section of this 
article, as Lieutenant in Captain Galeucia's Company, and October 2, 1775, 
Colonel Woodbridge petitioned that he be commissioned. This petition was 
referred to a committee of inquiry on the following day. He served through 
the year as an order for a bounty coat was issued to him on December 22. 
He served through the year 1776, as a Lieutenant in Colonel John Greaton's 
24th Regiment, Continental Army. January 1, 1777, he became a Captain 
in Colonel Edward Wigglesworth's 13th Regiment, Massachusetts Line, and 
he continued in that regiment until January 1, 1781, when he was transferred 
to Colonel Thomas Nixon's 6th Regiment, Massachusetts Line. After two 
years' service in the latter regiment he was retired January 1, 1783. 

FIRST LIEUTENANT AARON ROWLEY, of Richmond, was en- 
gaged May 10, 1775, as Lieutenant in Captain Stephen Pearl's Company, 
Colonel Woodbridge's Regiment. September 28, 1775, he was reported as 
First Lieutenant of the same company and regiment, " on Command to 
Quebec." In 1776, he was Captain in Colonel Jonathan Smith's Regiment, 
raised to serve in New York and Quebec. From February 23 to April 7, 
1777, he was a Captain in Major Rosseter's detachment of Berkshire County 
Militia at Ticonderoga. He served as Captain in the following organiza- 
tions in 1777; Colonel Benjamin Symond's 2nd Berkshire County Regiment, 
from April 26 to May 19; Colonel John Brown's 3d Berkshire Regiment, 
from June 30 to July 21 ; Colonel John Ashley's 1st Berkshire Regiment, from 
July 22 to August 13; Colonel David Rosseter's detachment of Berkshire 
County Militia, at Bennington, August 13 to 20, and Colonel John Brown's 
detachment, September 5 to October 1. February 6, 1778, he was chosen 
First Major of Colonel David Rosseter's 3d Berkshire County Regiment, 
"in room of Major Caleb Hyde elected Lieut. Colonel." He was engaged 
as Major of Lieutenant-Colonel Miles Powell's Regiment of Berkshire County 
men, July 18, 1779, and served until August 28th of that year. He held 
the same rank in Lieutenant-Colonel Barnabas Sears's Regiment from July 
20 to November 15, 1781. 

FIRST LIEUTENANT ASHAEL SMITH, of Granby, served as a 
private in Captain Samuel Smith's Company in August, 1757. From April 



COLONEL RUGGLES WOODBRIDGE'S REGIMENT SO 

14 to June 3, 1758, he was in Major John Hawk's Company, Colonel William 
Williams's Regiment. He also served the same year in Captain Robinson's 
Company, Colonel Ruggle's Hampshire County Regiment. He was Lieutenant 
in Captain John Cowls's Company, Colonel Woodbridge's Regiment, on the 
Lexington alarm of April 19, 1775. 

FIRST LIEUTENANT CALEB SMITH, of Lanesborough, was born 
in South Hadley about 1733. He resided in Sunderland in July, 1756, and 
was a husbandman by occupation. At that time he was a private in Lieu- 
tenant-Colonel Thomas Williams's Regiment, having joined from Captain 
Field's Company, Colonel Williams's Regiment. He was then in camp at 
Fort Edward. Upon the Lexington alarm of April 19, 1775, he marched 
as Ensign of Captain Asa Barn's Company, Colonel Paterson's Regiment. 
April 29, 1775, he was engaged as Lieutenant of Captain Asa Barn's Com- 
pany, Colonel Woodbridge's Regiment. He was called First Lieutenant in 
a return dated September 28, 1775. He also served as Lieutenant in a com- 
pany commanded by Captain Asa Barns, on an alarm in July, 1777. 

FIRST LIEUTENANT JOSIAH SMITH was probably the son of 
John and Esther (Colton) Smith. He enlisted April 22, 1756, in Colonel 
Israel Williams's Regiment, for service on an expedition to Crown Point. 
In the following year he was a member of Captain Moses Marsh's Company, 
which was formed out of the South Hadley Company to march to the relief 
of Fort William Henry. In July, 1771, he was Lieutenant in Captain Theo- 
dore Sedgwick's Troop of Horse, in Colonel John Ashley's South Berkshire 
Regiment. He was Lieutenant in Captain Noahdiah Leonard's Company, 
Colonel W r oodbridge's Regiment, on the Lexington alarm, April 19, 1775. 
April 27th he was engaged to serve in the same rank in Colonel Woodbridge's 
Regiment in the Provincial Army. He continued to serve through the year, 
and in a return of the company, made probably in October, he was called 
First Lieutenant. April 1, 1776, he was commissioned Captain in Colonel 
Samuel Howe's 4th Hampshire County Regiment. April 11, 1776, he was 
engaged as Captain in Colonel Josiah Whitney's 2nd Worcester County Regi- 
ment January 1, 1777, he became Captain in Colonel Thomas Marshall's 
10th Regiment, Massachusetts Line, and served until January 1, 1781, when 
he was retired on half pay. Later he was Lieutenant in Colonel Benjamin 
Tupper's 6th Regiment, Massachusetts Line, in 1783, as shown in a return 
of officers entitled to the commutation of five years' full pay in lieu of half 



90 THE MASSACHUSETTS MAGAZINE 

pay, agreeable to act of Congress of March 22, 1783. He removed to Brook- 
field, Vermont, and died there at the age of 66 years. 

SECOND LIEUTENANT JOSEPH DICKINSON, of Amherst, was 
a Corporal in Captain Elisha Pomeroy's Company, Colonel William Wil- 
liams's Regiment, from April 24 to October 28, (probably) 1758. At that 
time he resided in Hadley. He was Second Lieutenant in Captain Reuben 
Dickinson's Company of Minute Men in Colonel Woodbridge's Regiment, 
on the Lexington alarm of April 19, 1775. He was one of the Selectmen of 
Amherst in 1779, 1788 and 1794. He was involved in Shay's Rebellion, 
and after it was over took the oath of allegiance in February or March, 1787. 

SECOND LIEUTENANT SAMUEL GOULD, of Amherst, was the 
son of Samuel and Mehitable (Stiles) Gould. He was born in Boxford, 
March 20, 1727. May 2, 1775, he was engaged as Ensign in Captain Noah- 
diah Leonard's Company, Colonel Woodbridge's Regiment. In a return of 
the above company, made probably in October, 1775, he was called Second 
Lieutenant. He died in 1791. 

SECOND LIEUTENANT OLIVER HAGGET, of Waltham, was an 
Ensign in Captain John King's Company, Colonel Woodbridge's Regiment. 
In a muster roll dated August 1, 1775, it was stated that he enlisted June 
28, 1775. He served through the year. 

SECOND LIEUTENANT JAMES HENDRICK, of Amherst, was 
Lieutenant in command of a detachment from Captain Thomas W. Foster's 
Company of Matrosses in Colonel Woodbridge's Regiment, on the Lexington 
alarm of April 19, 1775. April 25 he joined the Provincial Army under the 
same officers. Colonel John Paterson certified January 10, 1776, that said 
Hendrick as Captain with his Company joined his regiment December 19, 
1775, and served continuously to the first-named date. November 8, 1778, he 
was credited as a Captain serving in Captain Reuben Dickinson's Company, 
Colonel Elisha Porter's 4th Hampshire County Regiment. , He was one of 
many to take the oath of allegiance after Shay's rebellion. 

LIEUTENANT ROBERT HAMILTON, of Conway, may have been 
the man of that name who resided in Pelham, and at the age of 28 enlisted 
April 2, 1759, for service in Canada in Colonel Israel Williams's Regiment, 
having served two years previous in Captain Lothridge's Company in the 



COLONEL RUGGLES WOODBRIDGE'S REGIMENT 01 

same regiment when it marched to the relief of Fort William Henry. April 
22, 1775, he was engaged as Lieutenant in Captain David Cowden's Company, 
Colonel Woodbridge's Regiment. He was one of the recruiting officers of 
the regiment July 15-16, 1775. He served in this regiment as late as Sep- 
tember 28, 1775. August 17, 1777, he was engaged as Lieutenant in Captain 
William Cooley's Company, Colonel John Moseley's 3d Hampshire County 
Regiment, and marched in response to the Bennington alarm. 

LIEUTENANT STEPHEN JEWIT, of Lanesborough. This name 
is given in a list of recruiting officers of this regiment, dated July 15, 1775. 
No record of any such commission can be found, however. Stephen " Juet," 
of Lanesborough, was a Sergeant in Captain Asa Barns's Company, Colonel 
Paterson's Regiment of Minute Men on the Lexington alarm of April 19, 
1775. As Stephen Jewett he enlisted May 17, 1775, in the same rank under 
the same officers and served as late as August 1, 1775. 

. SECOND LIEUTENANT ABNER PEASE, of New Canaan, was 
engaged as Ensign in Captain Stephen Pearl's Company, Colonel Woodbridge's 
Regiment. In a return dated September 28, 1775, he was called Second 
Lieutenant. 

LIEUTENANT JACOB RAMSDELL of Lynn, was the son of John 
and Rebecca (Hazelton) Ramsdell. He was born March 7, 1745-6. He was 
a private in Captain Ezra Newhall's (Lynn) Company of Minute Men on 
the Lexington alarm of April 19, 1775. He took the oath as a member of 
Captain Lindsey's Company, July 3, 1775. His name appears as sergeant in 
a list dated Aug. 3, 1775, of men belonging to Captain Eleazer Lindsey's 
Company, Colonel Samuel Gerrish's Regiment, said men having received ad- 
vance pay. He was called Lieutenant in " Capt. Eleazer Lindsea's co. com- 
manded by Lieut. Daniel Gallushee, Col. Ruggles Woodbridge's reg't," in a 
muster roll dated August 1, 1775, but as has been explained in the historical 
section of this article, this particular roll may have been made up later in 
the year and the above record as sergeant is in all probability the correct 
one. In a return made later in the year of the 10th company in this regi- 
ment, Captain Daniel Galeucia, commander, his name appears as Ensign. 
October 2, Colonel Woodbridge recommended that he be commissioned and 
a committee was appointed on the following day to inquire into his qualifi- 
cations for the office. 



92 THE MASSACHUSETTS MAGAZINE 

SECOND LIEUTENANT TIMOTHY READ (or REED), of Lanes- 
borough, was a private in Captain Asa Barn's Company of Minute Men which 
marched on the Lexington alarm of April 19, 1775. He was engaged April 29 
as Second Lieutenant under the same officers, and probably served through the 
year. He was Sergeant-Major of Colonel Woodbridge's Militia Regiment in 
October, 1776, and was appointed Ensign, in place of Ensign Abner Lyman, 
who was advanced. He was also in all probability the man of that name who 
was in Captain Asa Barns's Company, Colonel Benjamin Symonds's 2d Berk- 
shire Regiment, which marched on an alarm at the northward, October 
26, 1780. 

SECOND LIEUTENANT DANIEL SHAYS (or SHAY), of Shutes- 
bury, was born in Hopkinton, in 1747. He was a Sergeant in Captain Reuben 
Dickinson's Company of Minute Men on the Lexington alarm of April 19, 
1775. May 1, 1775, he was engaged as Second Lieutenant under the same 
officers, and he served through the year. He was Captain in Colonel Rufus 
Putnam's 5th Regiment, Continental Army, from January 1, 1777, to October 
14, 1780, when he resigned. His reasons for resigning have been termed 
" quite problematical." He then resided in Pelham, and in 1786 took such 
an active part in the popular movement in western Massachusetts to redress 
alleged wrongs that it was termed " Shays's Rebellion." Owing to the financial 
drain of the long years of the Revolution many of the farmers were deeply 
in debt, not only for taxes, but to private individuals. The annual taxes of 
the State of Massachusetts amounted to a million dollars, and many farmers 
were being sued in the courts for unpaid obligations. As this tax was largely 
on land, the farmers felt that they were paying more than their share. Con- 
ventions were ::e.d and unscrupulous leaders then, as in modern labor agita- 
tions, endeavored to stir up class feeling. As a result of the efforts of these 
aggressive haranguers the workingmen were arrayed against the capitalists 
and the people were urged on to mob violence. Trouble developed to such 
an extent that Governor Bowdoin called a special session of the legislature in 
September, 1786, and after vain use of peaceful measures called out the militia 
to protect the courts in the southwestern part of the state. In the following 
month, Congress, fearing that an attempt would be made to seize the armory 
at Springfield, voted to enlist 1,300 men. Before these troops could be raised, 
open insurrection broke out, and Shays, who had been chosen leader, at the 
head of 1,000 men, took possession of Worcester and prevented a session of 
the Court of Common Pleas there, December 5, 1786. He did the same 



COLONEL RUGGLES WOODBRIDGE'S REGIMENT 93 

thing with the Supreme Court at Springfield on the 25th of December. As 
the movement seemed to be gaining strength, Governor Bowdoin called out 
the militia, who assembled at Boston in mid-winter and marched to Worcester 
and Springfield. This force numbered several thousand, and was commanded 
by Major-General Benjamin Lincoln. On the 25th of January, 1787, Shays 
demanded the surrender of the United States Arsenal at Springfield, but 
owing to the vigorous defence of Colonel William Shepard, the commandant, 
the insurgents were repelled. Upon the approach of General Lincoln with 
his army, two days later, Shays and his men retreated. Lincoln followed, and 
at Petersham captured 150 of them and dispersed the main body, many fleeing 
into New Hampshire. Lincoln then marched his men into the western counties 
of the state and soon succeeded in breaking up the insurrection. Shays fled 
to Vermont. Free pardon was finally offered to the insurrectionists, and the 
oath of allegiance was generally signed. After about a year Shays asked for 
and received a pardon. He then removed to Sparta, N. Y., and died there 
September 29, 1825, having previously so far restored himself to the good 
graces of the authorities as to receive a pension for services in the Revolution. 

SECOND LIEUTENANT JOHN THOMSON, of Pelham, may have 
been the man of that name of Brimfield, who was a private in Captain Daniel 
Burt's Company, Colonel William Williams's Regiment, from May 4 to 
November 5, 1758. He was Second Lieutenant of Captain Elijah Dwight's 
Company, Colonel Woodbridge's Regiment, from the middle to the end of 
December, 1775. He was Captain of a Pelham Company, in Colonel Samuel 
Howe's 4th Hampshire County Regiment, receiving his commission April 1, 
1776. 

SECOND LIEUTENANT ELEAZER WARNER, of Granby, was 
evidently the man of that name who, as a resident of South Hadley, was a 
private in Major John Hawk's Company, Colonel William Williams's Regi- 
ment, from April 4 to June 3, 1758. He was Second Lieutenant in Captain 
John Cowls's Company, Colonel Woodbridge's Regiment, on the Lexington 
alarm of April 19, 1775. He left thef service in July, 1775, and was reported 
to have returned home. January 13, 1776, he was Lieutenant in Captain 
James Hendrick's Company, his name appearing in a list of officers under 
Colonel Paterson, who reinforced the army. August 17, 1777, he was First 
Lieutenant in Captain Phineas Smith's Company, Colonel Woodbridge's Regi- 
ment, on the Bennington alarm. He was commissioned November 25, 1777, 
Captain in Colonel Elisha Porter's 4th Hampshire County Regiment, chosen 



94 ♦ THE MASSACHUSETTS MAGAZINE 

in place of Captain Phineas Smith, resigned. His name appeared in a list 
of officers certified to by Brigadier General T. Danielson, April 18, 17S0, 
whose resignations would be accepted for the good of the service. His resigna- 
tion was accepted in Council on the same date. 

SECOND LIEUTENANT DANIEL WHITMORE, of Sunderland, 
was the son of Daniel and Mehitable (Hubbard) Whitmore, of Middletown, 
Connecticut. He was born in the last-named town, and removed to Sunderland 
shortly before the Revolution. He held that rank in Captain Noahdiah 
Leonard's Company, Colonel Woodbridge's Regiment, on the Lexington alarm 
of April 19, 1775. He was chosen Second Major in Colonel Elisha Wright's 
6th Hampshire County Regiment, his commission bearing date of February 
8, 1776. August 21, 1777, he was engaged as Lieutenant-Colonel of Colonel 
Woodbridge's Regiment, serving until December 8, 1777. He served as 
Second Major in Lieutenant-Colonel Samuel Williams's Hampshire County 
Regiment, according to a return dated December 30, 1778. He was engaged 
as Lieutenant-Colonel of Colonel Seth Murray's 2nd Hampshire County Regi- 
ment, July 4, 1780, and served until October 10, 1780. He was called Colonel 
in a receipt dated January 28, 1781. He was a prominent citizen of Sunder- 
land, and one of its early magistrates. He was a Representative to the 
General Court in 1808, and a member of the Constitutional Convention in 
1780. He died May 7, 1816, aged 73. 

SECOND LIEUTENANT JOSIAH WILLSON, of Greenwich, held 
that rank in Captain Joseph Hooker's Company, Colonel Woodbridge's Regi- 
ment, on the Lexington alarm of April 19, 1775. He was Second Lieutenant 
in Captain Isaac Gray's Company, Colonel Jonathan Brewer's Regiment, as 
stated in a return dated October 6, 1775. April 1, 1776, he was commissioned 
First Lieutenant in Captain Isaac Powers's 1st Greenwich Company, Colonel 
Samuel Howe's 4th Hampshire County Regiment. 

SECOND LIEUTENANT JOSHUA LAMB WOODBRIDGE, of 
Hatfield (also called Ensign), held the first-named rank in Captain Seth 
Murray's Company, Colonel Woodbridge's Regiment, and was engaged for 
that service, May 1, 1775. In March, 1776, he was Second Lieutenant under 
the same company commander in the 2nd Hampshire County Regiment. 
December 1, 1776, he was engaged as First Lieutenant in Captain Oliver 
Lyman's Company, Colonel Nicholas Dike's Regiment. He was engaged as 
Lieutenant in Captain Seth Murray's Company, Major Jonathan Clapp's Regi- 



COLONEL RUGGLES WOODBRIDGE'S REGIMENT 95 

ment, July 9, 1777, to serve on an expedition to Fort Edward and Mosses 
Creek. From September 20 to October 14, 1777, he was Adjutant of Colonel 
Ezra May's 2nd Hampshire County Regiment, at Saratoga. July 6, 1778, he 
was commissioned Captain in Colonel Israel Chapin's 2nd Hampshire County 
Regiment, and August 4, 1779, was commissioned in Colonel Nathan Tyler's 
3d Worcester County Regiment for service at Rhode Island. He received 
his discharge December 25, 1779. In 1780 he made returns of men to serve 
in the Continental Army. 

THIRD LIEUTENANT WILLIAM SMITH was engaged (evidently 
as private) May 11, 1775. He was commissioned Third Lieutenant of Captain 
John King's Company, Colonel Woodbridge's Regiment, July 3, 1775. July 
15 he was one of the recruiting officers of the regiment. In all probability 
he was the man of that name who was Second Lieutenant in Colonel Symonds's 
2nd Berkshire County Regiment, commissioned October 8, 1779. Seven days 
later he was engaged to serve in the same rank in Captain Asa Barns's Com- 
pany, Colonel Israel Chapin's 2nd Hampshire County Regiment, and he served 
until November 12, 1779. He was a Lieutenant in Lieutenant Daniel Brown's 
Company, Colonel Benjamin Symonds's Regiment, from October 13 to 17, 
1780. He was also credited with service as First Lieutenant in Captain 
Daniel Brown's Company in the 2nd Berkshire County Regiment (year not 
given). 

ENSIGN JOHN MAYO, of Ware, was a Sergeantin Captain Ichabod 
Dexter's Company, Colonel Woodbridge's Regiment, He was engaged to 
serve in that rank May 1, 1775, and served until June 21, when his com- 
mission as Ensign in the same company was ordered. He was one of the 
recruiting officers of the regiment. July 15, 1775. January 1, 1776, he became 
First Lieutenant in Colonel Ebenezer Learned's 3d Continental Regiment. 

ENSIGN N. PEASE. His name appears as a recruiting officer in 
Colonel Woodbridge's Regiment, July 15, 1775. No record of date of his 
commission has been found, and his name does not appear again as a com- 
missioned officer. 

ENSIGN JAMES TAYLOR, of Pelham, may have been the man of 
that name who resided in Palmer in 1758, and from April 7 to June 2 of 
that year was in Captain Daniel Burt's Company, Colonel William Williams's 
Regiment. He served as Ensign in Captain David Cowden's Company of 
Minute Men, Colonel Woodbridge's Regiment, on the Lexington alarm of 
April 19, 1775, holding that rank for two weeks and two days. He was a 
Selectman in Pelham in 1778, and in 1809 as "Lieutenant" Taylor was a 
member of a committee in regard to the dismissal of the minister at Pelham. 



THE DOROTHY QUINCY HOME 
STEAD, QUINCY, MASS. 

By Arthur Boardmax Cushing 



The Dorothy Quincy House, shown in the accompanying picture is 
still standing on Hancock Street. Quincy. It was the oldest of the three 
Quincy Mansions and was begun on its present site, June 14, 1706, an 
old farmhouse, which William Coddington, afterwards governor of Rhode 
Island, built, being joined with it. 

The house is of typical colonial architecture, both within and on the 
outside. The interior contains closets of queer shapes and lockers similar 
to those on shipboard. 

The bed in the first room at the left of the front door is place d in the 
wall and can be wholly enclosed by a folding panel, reminding one of 
a berth on a steamboat. Just beyond this room on the same side of the 
house, is a room which was used by Tutor Flynt as a study, the other 
being his bedroom. 

Just above Tutor Flynts bedroom was the guest chamber in which is 
now standing an old-fashioned canopy-top bedstead, once occupied by 
General Lafayette as a guest. The bedstead has a trundle-bed connected 
with it. 

The first room at the right of the front door was used as a dining room 
and the style of furniture used in colonial dining-rooms has been restored. 

There is an old open fire-place here, built into another of mammoth 
proportions, such as children sat in, looking up at the stars. It was only 
found three years ago, a large folding casing enclosing it from the rest of 
the room. 



• 5 ^ 




f 




^\^4*^ ''i^/~y J*- 



- 



THE DOROTHY QUINCY HOMESTEAD 97 

"Dorothy Q." of Oliver Wendell Holmes' poetry was born in this 
house, Jan. 4, 1709. She lived to become a woman of beautiful charac- 
ter ; she married Edward Jackson, Esq., their daughter, Mary, marrying 
Judge Oliver Wendell, and Sarah Wendell, daughter of Judge and Mary 
Wendell, marrying Rev. Abiel Holmes, father of the poet. O. W. Holmes. 
There was a famous portrait of "Dorothy Q^," which hung in the house 
of Holmes' grandfather, in Boston, occupied at one time by British offi- 
cers, before Boston was evacuated, and one of these stabbed the picture 
near the right eye, with a sword, the affair being described by Holmes as 
follows : 

"Grandmother's mother: her age, I guess, 
Thirteen summers, or something less; 
Girlish bust, but womanly air; 
Smooth, square forehead with uprolled hair; 
Lips that lover has never kissed; 
Taper fingers and slender wrist; 
Hanging sleeves of stiff brocade; 
So they painted the little maid. 

"On her hand a parrot green 
Sits unmoving and broods serene. 
Hold up the canvas full in view, — 
Look ! there's a rent the light shines through, 
Dark with a century's fringe of dust, — 
That was a Red-coat's rapier thrust ! 
Such is the tale the lady old, 
Dorothy's daughter's daughter, told. 

The father of this Dorothy was a judge who distinguished himself on 
both sides of the Atlantic and died in London where he had defended 
Massachusetts in a dispute over the boundary between that state and 
New Hampshire. 

His son Edmund took possession of the homestead soon after. This 
Edmund w r as the father of the Dorothy Quincy who married John Han- 
cock, the patriot. He had five daughters, all very handsome. 

Not far away was the residence of Colonel John Quincy, for whom 
the town was named in 1792. There was much social intercourse amongst 
distinguished people of the immediate vicinity, all centering in Edmund 
Quincy's house. The youngest of the family was Dorothy; it is not 



98 THE MASSACHUSETTS MAGAZINE 

known when she consented to become the wife of John Hancock, although 
it is believed that it was while she lived at home. 

The family were separated, however, at the beginning of the Revolu- 
tionary War, and Dorothy had to go to Lexington, and afterwards was 
sheltered in the home of Thaddeus Burr, at Fairfield, Conn., where she 
married Hancock. 

After the Revolution the homestead changed hands. It was mort- 
gaged by a Jackson, then bought by a Black and afterwards by Elizabeth 
Greenleaf. At last Dr. Woodward owned it and it was left by him to the 
town of Quincy towards the support of an academy for girls. 

Later the place was bought by the Adams Trust Company from whom 
the house and two acres of land were acquired by Rev. Daniel M. Wilson, 
at that time pastor of the First Church, Quincy. Later still, the Metro- 
politan Park Commission and the Society of Colonial Dames purchased 
it together and it has been made a part of the Furnace Brook Parkway. 
The Commissioners now lease the house to the Dames who allow entrance 
by the public at certain times. 



• '•■ ' •■«'.' .-..'• 



MASSACHUSETTS IN LITERATURE 



By Charles A. Flagg 



Recent titles of a historical or descriptive character dealing with the state or its localities. The list in- 
cludes not only books and pamphlets, but articles wherever found; in periodicals, society publications, etc. 

While it primarily cails attention to material appearing since the last issue of. this magazine, frequently 
titles are included which had been overlooked in previous numbers. 



GENERAL 

American. Proceedings of the American 
Antiquarian Societv. New series, Vol. 
XIX. April 15. 1908— April 21, 1909. 
Worcester, 1909. 452 p. 

Proceedings of the American Anti- 
quarian Societv. New series, Vol. XX. 
Oct. 20, 1909— Oct. 19, 1910. Worcester, 

1910. 448 p. 

Baker. Bibliography of lists of New Eng- 
land soldiers. By Mary E. Baker (New 
England historical and genealogical reg- 
ister, Jan. 1911. v. 65, p. 11-19). 
Part 4 (Mass. local H — W); series began v. 64, 

p. 61, Jan. 1910. 

Bardeen. A little flier's war diary, with 
17 maps, 60 portraits and 246 other il- 
lustrations. By C. W. Bardeen former- 
ly of Co D., 1st. Mass. Vol. Inf. Syra- 
cuse, N...Y. C. W. Bardeen, 1910. 329 
P- 

Colonial. Publications of the Colonial 
Society of Mass. Volume XII. Tran- 
sactions, 190S-1909. Boston, 1911. 
458 p. 

Daughters. Mass. state conference, D. A. 
R. Oct. 20-21, 1910. By H. Josephine 
Hayward, assistant state historian. 
(American monthly magazine, Jan. 

1911. v. 38, p. 27-29.) 

Davis. Hints of contemporary life in the 
writings of Thomas Shepard. By A. M. 
Davis (Colonial Society of Mass. Publi- 
cations. Boston, 1911. v. 12, p. 136- 
162. 

— -John Harvard's life in America, or 

Social and political life in New England 
in 1637-1638. By A.M. Davis (Col- 
onial Society of Mass. Publications. 
Boston, 1911. v. 12, p. 4-45.) 

Deane. Roster 21st Mass. Volunteer In- 
fantry, Aug. 23d, 1861 to Sept. 30, 1864. 
Battles fought, men engaged and losses. 



[By N. C. Deane of Co. D.J 1911. 2 
leaves. 

Dedication. Dedication of the Mass. 
monument at Newbern, N. C. (Massa- 
chusetts magazine, Jan. 1909. v. 2, p. 
48.) 

Flagg, Local historical societies in Mass. 
By C. A. Flagg. (Massachusetts maga- 
zine Apr. 1909. v. 2. p. 81-97.) 

List of societies, active and defunct, with date 
of organization, membership, list of otneers and serial 
publications. 

Gardner. Captain Jonathan Haraden. 
By F. A. Gardner. (Massachusetts maga- 
zine, Oct. 1909. v. 2. p. 191—199.) 

Prominent in the state navy and the Revolu- 
tion. 

Colonel Ebenezer Bridge's regiment, 

1775. By F. A. Gardner. (Massachu- 
sett magazine, Oct. 1909. v. 2, p. 203- 
227.) 

— Colonel Ephraim Dool;ttle's regi- 
ment 1775. By F. A. Gardner. (Massa- 
chusetts magazine, Jan. 1909. v. 2, p. 
11-29. 

Colonel John Fellow's regiment, 



1775. By F. A. Gardner. (Massachu- 
setts magazine, July, 19C9. v. 2, p. 
141-161. 

Colonel Timothy Danielson's regi- 



ment, 1775. By F. A. Gardner. (Massa- 
chusetts magazine, Apr. 1909. v. 2, p. 
69-83.) 

Field day, Mass. Society, S. A. 



R. By F. A. Gardner. (Massachusetts 
magazine, Oct. 1909. v. 2, p. 237-238.) 
State brigantine Active in the 



Revolution. By F. A. Gardner. (Massa- 
chusetts magazine, Oct. 1909. v. 2, p. 
234-236.) 

State brigantine Independence in 



the Revolution. By F. A. Gardner. 
(Massachusetts magazine, Jan. 1909. v. 
2. p. 45-47.) 






! 



100 



THE MASSACHUSETTS MAGAZINE 



State sloop Freedom in the Rev- 
olution. By F. A. Gardner. (Massa- 
chusetts magazine, Apr. 1909. v. 2, p. 
101-105.) 

State sloop Republic in the Revo- 



lution. By F. A. Gardner. (Massachu- 
setts magazine, July, 1£09. v .2, p. 168- 
171.) 
Gardner. Settlers about Boston Bay 
prior to 1630. By Lucie M. Gardner. 
(Massachusetts magazine, Apr. -July. 
1909. v. 2, p. 115-117, 176-183.) 

Hosmer.' The debt of Mass. to Thomas 
Hutchinson. By J. K. Hosmer. (Col- 
onial Societv of Mass. Publications. 
Boston, 1911/ v. 12, p. 238-246.) 

Mass. Report of the Commissioners on 
war records. Jan. 1911. Boston, 1911. 

5 p. (Public document, no. 66.) 

Military. Military Order of the Loyal 
Legion of the United States, Headquar- 
ters Commandery, of the state of Mass. 
Circulars, no. 1-7 series 1910; whole no. 
496-502. Boston, 1910. 7 nos. 

Old. Old Planters Society; Fall meet- 
ing in Boston, Nov. 1908. (Massachu- 
setts magazine, Jan. 1909. v. 2, p. 54.) 

Smalley. Anglo-American memories. 

By G. W. Smalley. New York, G. P. 

Putnam's sons, 1911. 441 p. 
The first third of the work contains reminis- 
ences of the 20 years before the Civil war, including 
the anti-slavery movement in Mass. 

Titus. The last survivors of the War for 
independence. By Anson Titus. (Ameri- 
can monthly magazine, Jan. -Mar. 1911. 
v. 38, p. 21-22, 65-67, 108.) 
1000 names, with dates of decease, chiefly from 

newspapers. Nearly all the deaths occurred after 

1830 and a large proportion in Mass. 

Part 7-9, covering Hart-Hawes; Healey- Kidder , 

and Kidder- Lawrence, respectively. Began in May 

1910. v. 36, p. 536. 

Ware. An incident in Winthrop's voyage 
to New England. By H. E. Ware. 
(Colonial Society of Mass. Publications. 
Boston, 1911. v. 12, p. 101-113.) 

■ — Winthrop's course across the At- 
lantic. By H. E. W r are. (Colonial Society 
of Mass. Publications. Boston, 1911. 
v. 12, p. 191-203 ) 

Who's. Who's who in state politics, 1911. 
Boston, Published by Practical Politics, 

6 Beacon St., [1911]. 319. 
First edition, 1907. 



LOCAL. 

Andover. Vital records of Andover, 
Mass. to the end of the year 1849. Vol. 
I— Births. Topsfield, Topsfield Histori- 
cal Society, 1912. 391 p. 

Barnstable. Barnstable vital records. 
Transcribed by G. E. Bowman. (May- 



12, p. 



flower descendant, July 1910. 
153-156. 
Part 15; series began Oct. 1900. v. 2. p. 212. 

Barnstable County. Abstracts of 

Barnstable County probate records. By 

G. E. Bowman. (Mayflower descendant, 

July 1910. v. 12, p. 187-190). 

Part 10 (1691-1692); series began in July. 1900. 

v. 2. p. 176. 

Berkshire County. Second annual re- 
port of the Mount Everett Reservation 
Commission, Jan. 1911. Boston, 1911. 
5 p. (Public Document, 89.) 

Colonel John Fellow's regiment, 

1775. By F. A. Gardner. (Massachu- 
setts magazine, July, 1909. v. 2, p. 141- 
161.) 

3 of the 10 companies were from Berkshire. 

Boston. Dutch pirates in Boston. 1694- 
1695. By G. M. Bodge. (Bostonian So- 
ciety publications. Boston 1910. v. 7, 
p. 31-60.) 

Proceedings of the Bostonian 

Society at the annual meeting, Jan. 2, 
1909. Boston, 1909. Ill p. 

Diary of Rev. Samuel Checkley, 

1735 with notes by H. W. Cunningham. 
(Colonial Society of Mass. Publications. 
Boston, 1911. v. 12, p. 270-306.) 

The seige of Boston. By Allen 

French. New York, The Macmillan Com- 
pany, 1911. 450 p. 

Settlers about Boston Bay prior to 

1630. By Lucie M. Gardner. (Massachu- 
setts magazine, Apr.-July, 1909. v. 2, 
p. 115-117, 176-1S3.) 

New Boston. Published by Bos- 
ton 1915, inc. vol. I, no. 1-12, May, 
1910,-Apr.-1911. 538 p. 

Boston's lanes and alleys. By J. 

T. Prince. (Bostonian Society publica- 
tions. Boston, 1910. v. 7, p. 7-29.) 

Boston. The Bunch of grapes tavern. 
By E. O. Randall. (Ohio archaeological 
and historical quarterly, Jan. 1911. v. 
20, p. 136.) 



RECENT MAGAZINE ARTICLES 



101 



The story of Boston light. By 

Fitz-Henry Smith. (Bostonian Society 
publications. Boston, 1910. v. 7, p. 61- 
128.) 

The site of Faneuil hall. By W. 

K. Watkins (Bostonian Society publi- 
cations. Boston, 1910. v. 7, p. 129-138.) 

See also Charlestown. 

Brewster see Harwich. 

Charlestown. Old cemetery inscrip- 
tions from the old Milk Row Cemetery, 
now known as Somerville Cemetery. 
(Historic leaves, published by the Somer- 
ville Historical Society. Julv-Oct. 
1908. v. 7, p. 42--1S. 65-71.) 
Somerville was set oS from old Charlestown in 

1842. 

The founding of Charlestown by 

the Spragues; a glimpse of the begin- 
ning of the Mass. Bav settlement. By 
H. H. Sprague. Boston, The W. B. 
Clarke Co., 1910. 39 p. 

Records relating to the Old 

Powder house. (Historic leaves, 
published by the Somerville Historical 
Society. Oct. 1908. v. 7, p. 62-65.) 

Chatham. Chatham vital records. Tran- 
scribed by G. E. Bowman. (Mayflower 
descendant, Julv-Oct., 1910. v. 'l2, p 
171-176, 215-218.) 
Parts 12-13; series began July, 1902. v 4, p. 

182. 

Chester. Vital records of Chester, Mass 
to the year 1S50. Boston, New Eng- 
land Historic Genealogical Society, 1911 
206 p. 

Dan vers. The Rebecca Nourse house 
Danvers. By T. F. Waters. (Massachu- 
setts magazine, Oct. 1909. v. 2, p. 255- 
256.) 

Dartmouth. The Padanaram salt works. 
By A. C. Church. (New England raag- 
zine, Dec. 1909. v. 41, p. 488-492.) 

Dedham. Famous old Fairbanks house, 
built in 1636. (Journal of American 
history, 1st quarter, 1911. v. 5, p. 10.) 

The Fairbanks house, Dedham. 

By Laura W. Fowler. (Magazine of his- 
tory, Nov. 1910. v. 12, p. 273-275.) 

Deerfield. The Williams house at 
Deerfield. (Massachusetts magazine, 
Jan. 1909. v. 2, p. 41.) 

Duxbury. Duxbury vital records. 
Transcribed by G. E. Bowman. (May- 



flower descendant, July, 1910. v. 12 
p. 161-170.) 

Births 1699-1771 from a MS volume entitled 
proprietors of the 2nd division, 1712-1754. Part 2; 
series beijan Apr. 19 LO. v. 12, p IIS. 

Eastham. Records of the First church 
in Orleans, formerly the First church in 
Eastham. Communicated by S. W. 
Smith. (Ma\ flower descendant, Julv, 
1910. v. 12, p. 151-152.) 

Part 4 Q7S2-17S5); series began in July. 1903. 
v. 10. p. 165. 

Essex County. The Essex Institute his- 
torical collections. Vol. XLVI— 1910. 
Salem, 1910. 384 p 

Family genealogies. Essex County. 

By Lucie M. Gardner. (Massachusetts 
magazine, Oct. 1909— Oct. 1910. v. 2. p. 
240-253; v. 3. p. 71-85, 147-158, 211- 
221, 272-277.) 

Continuation of the Genealogical dictionary of 
Essex County (Abbe-Brov.-n) by Sidney Periey, 
published in the Essex antiquarian, up to Oct. 19U9, 
Parts 1-5 (Browning-Burnett.) 

Foxborough. Foxborough warnings. 

1779-1796. Communicated by R. W. 

Carpenter (New England historical and 

genealogical register, Jan. 1911. v. 65, 

p. 39-43.) 
Vital records of Foxborough, Mass. 

to the year 1850. Boston, New Eng 

land Historic Genealogical Society, 1911. 

249 p. 
Franklin County. Some old meeting 

houses of the Connecticut Valley. By 

C. A. Wright, [Chicopee Falls, The 

Rich print, 1911.] 144 p. 

The Colrain pulpit, with view, p. 29, The old 
church in Ashfield. with views, p. 119-120, aiso views 
of old Deerfield church, facing p. 8, and Congrega- 
tional church, Montague, facing p. 11. 

Gloucester. Gloucester day 1904. By 
Lucie M. Gardner. (Massachusetts maga- 
zine, July 1909. v. 2, p. 184.) 

Grafton. The old Merriam house. By 
C. A. Flagg. (Massachusetts magazine. 
Apr. 1909. v. 2, p. 98.) 

Halifax. Gravestone records from the 
Thompson street cemetery, Halifax, 
prior to 1851. Communicated by J. W. 
Willard. (Mayflower descendant, Oct. 
1910. v. 12, p' 239-243.) 
Part I. (Allen— Eaton.) 

Hampden County. Some old meeting 

houses of the Connecticut Vallev. Bv 

C. A. Wight. [Chicopee Falls, The 

Rich print, 1911.] 144 p. 

Including sketches and views of churches in 



102 



THE MASSACHUSETTS MAGAZINE 



Chicopee, Holyoke, Lon>?meadow, Ludlow, Spring- 
field and West Springfield. 

Hampshire County. Colonel John Fel- 
low's regiment, 1775. By F. A. Gard- 
ner.(Massachusetts magazine, July, 1909. 
v. 2, p. 141-161.) 
6 of the 10 companies were raised in Hamp- 
shire. 

Colonel Timothy Danielscn's regi- 
ment, 1775. By F. A. Gardner. (Massa- 
chusetts magazine, Apr. 1909. v. 2, p. 
69-83.) 

From the southern part of Hampshire, which 
became Hampden County in 1812. 

Some old meeting houses of the 

Connecticut Vallev. Bv C A. Wight. 
[Chicopee Falls, The Rich print, 1911.] 
144 p 

Including sketches and views of churches, in 

Easthampton, Enfield, Granby, Hadley, Hatfield, 

Northampton, South Hadley, Southampton and 
Williamsburg. 

Hanover. History of the town of Han- 
over, Mass. with family genealogies. By 
Jedediah Dwelley and J. F. Simmons, 
Hanover, Published by the town, 1910. 
291, 474 p. 

Hanson. Vital records of Hanson, Mass. 
to the year 1850. Boston. New Eng- 
land Historic Genealogical Society, 1911. 
110 p. 

Harwich. Carver-Small-Smith private 
cemetery between Harwich Centre 
and Harwich Port. Records copied by 
S. W. Smith and J. W, Willard. (May- 
flower descendant, Oct. 1910. v. 12, p. 
256.) 

Records of the First Parish in 

Brewster, formerly the First Parish in 
Harwich. Transcribed by G. E. Bow- 
man. (Mayflower descendant, July — Oct. 
1910. v. 12, p. 156-158, 252-253'.) 
Parts 14-15 (1762-1765); series began in Oct. 

1902. v. 4, p. 242, 

Haverhill. The experience of Haverhill 
under the commission form of govern- 
ment. By DeMont Goodvear. (The In- 
dependent, Feb. 24, 1910.'v. 68, p. 415- 
416.) 

Ipswich. Vital records of Ipsw r ich, Mass. 
to the end of the year 1849. Vol. I — 
Births. Salem, The Essex Institute, 
1910. 404 p. 

The Whipple house, Ipswich. (Mag- 
azine of history, Nov. 1910. v. 12, p. 
276.) 

Lake Pleasant see Montague. 



Leominster. Vital records of Leomin- 
ster, Mass. to the end of the vear 1849. 
Worcester, F. P. Rice, 1911. 309 p. 

Lynn. The Lvnn review. By E. W. In- 
galls. Vol. 12. Nov. 1909-Oct. 1910. 
Lynn. 1909—10. 12 nos. 

Marblehead. Fall meeting of Old Plant- 
ers Society at Marblehead. By Lucie 
M. Gardner. (Massachusetts magazine, 
Oct. 1909. v. 2, p. 239.) 

Personal diary of Ashley Bowen 

of Marblehead. (Massachusetts maga- 
zine. July 1908-Apr. 1909. v. 1, p. 
174-176, 260-266; v. 2, p. 109-114.) 

Parts 1-3 1759-1773. 

Marshfield. Records from the Old burial 
ground at the Congregational church, 
Marshrield. Communicated by J. W. 
Willard. (Mavflower descendant, Julv- 
Oct. 1910. v. 12, p. 148-150, 251.) 
Parts 2-3 (Decrow-Gordon and Hall-Hatch); 

eries began Jan. 1910. v 12, p. 54. 

Middleborough. Gravestone records, 
prior to 1S51 from the Old cemetery at 
"The Green," Middleborough. Com- 
municated by J. W. Willard. (May- 
flower descendant, July-Oct. 1910. v. 
12, p. 142-145, 198-2020 

Parts 2-3 (Bryant-Cole and Conant-Ellis) ; series 

began Apr. 1910 v, 12, p. 65. 

Middleborough vital records. 

Transcribed by G. E. Bowman. (May- 
flower descendant, July-Oct. 1910. v. 12, 
p. 130-132, 230-233.) 

Small pox cemetery; East Midrileborough. 
Copied by J. W. Willard. (Mayflower descendant, 
Oct. 1910. v. 12, p. 256.) 

Parts 16-17; series began Oct. 1899. v. 1, p. 219. 

Middlesex County. Colonel Ebenezer 
Bridges' regiment, 1775. By F. A. 
Gardner. (Massachusetts magazine, Oct. 

1909. v. 2, p. 203-227.) 

Milton. Robert Vose and his times, 

compiled by Ellen F. Vose and Marv H. 

Hinckley, 1910. [21] p. 

Reprinted from the Milton record. Nov.-Dec. 

1910. Vose was an early setiler of Milton and the 

pamphlet contains much on settlement of the town. 

Montague. The new Baedeker: casual 
notes of an irresponsible traveller. Lake 
Pleasant, Mass. (The Bookman, X. Y. 
Jan. 1910. v. 30, p. 476- 488.) 

The rebirth of a Yankee town. By 

E. S. Pressey. (The Independent, Apr. 7, 

1910. v. 68, p. 735-740.) 
Nantucket. The Horseshoe (or Coffin) 

house, Nantucket. By Mabel G. Mitch- 
ell (Magazine of history, Nov. 1910. v. 
12, p. 275-276.) 



RECENT MAGAZINE ARTICLES 



103 



Newbury. The Rev. James No yes house, 
Newbury. By B. L. Xoyes (Massachu- 
setts magazine, Jan. 1909. v. 2. p. 30- 
32.) 
Newburyport. Vital records of New- 
buryport, Mass. to the end of the year 
1849. Vol. I— Births. Salem, The Essex 
Institute, 1911. 42S p. 
Northampton. How one man made his 
town bloom. By Rose Bartlett. 
(Ladies home journal, Mar. 1910. v. 27, 
p. 36, 80, 82.) 
On the work of George W. Cable in Northamp- 
ton. 

Pembroke. Vital records of Pembroke, 
Mass. to the year 1S50. Boston, New 
England Historic Genealogical Society, 
1911. 465. p. 

Pepperell. Experiences of an American 
minister from his manuscript in 1748. 
Original journal of Rev. Joseph Emer- 
son. By Edith M. Howe. (Journal of 
American history. 2d quarter 1909. v. 
3, p. 119-127.) 
Covers Aug. 1748-Mar. 1749. 

— Diary kept by Rev. Joseph Emer- 
son of Pepperell, Aug. 1, 1748-April 9, 
1749. With notes and an introduction 
by S. A. Green. Cambridge, J. Wilson 
&son, 1911. 23 p. 

From Proceedings of the Mass. Historical Society 
for Dec. 1910. 



Prudence Wright chapter, D. A. R. 

By Nellie B. Appletcn, historian. (Amer- 
ican monthly magazine, Feb. 1911. v. 
38, p. 69.) 

Plymouth. Plymouth vital records. 
Transcribed by G. E. Bowman. (May- 
flower descendant, Oct 1910. v. 12, p. 
222-226.) 
Part 16; series began July 1899. v. I, p. 139. 

Plymouth Colony. The myth of Mary 
Chilton. By S. A. Bent. (Bostonian 
Society. Proceedings. Boston, 1909. 
p. 50-78.) 

Some differences between Ply- 
mouth and Jamestown. By Morton 
Dexter. (Colonial Society of Mass. Pub- 
lications. Boston, 191 if v. 12, p. 256- 
270.) 

Plymouth Colony deeds. Tran- 
scribed by G. E. Bowman. (Mayflower 
descendant, July-Oct. 1910. v. 12, p. 
132-135, 212-215.) 

Parts 33-34; series began in Apr. 1899. v. 1, p. 
91. 



Plymouth Colony wills and inven- 
tories; abstracts of the records in Vol. 
II. By G. E. Bowman (Mayflower 
descendant, O.t. 1910. v. 12, p. 244- 
247.) 
Abstracts of MS Vol. I. printed in 30 pans, 

Jan. 1899-Oct. 1909. 

Princeton*. Ninth annual report of the 
Wachusett Mountain State Reservation 
Commission. Jan. 1909. Boston, 1909. 
10 p. (Public document, no. 65.) 

Provincetown. The Pilgrims and their 
monument. Bv E. T- Carpenter, New 

• York. D. Apple'ton &c Co. 1911. 301) p. 

The Spectator at Provincetown. 

(The Outlook, N Y. Aug. 10, 1910. v. 
95, p. S65-866.) 

Quincy Famous old Ouincy-Butler 
mansion, built in 16S0. (Journal of 
American history, 1st quarter, 1911. v. 
5, p. 7.) 

Rutland. Rufus Putnam Memorial Asso- 
ciation. (Ohio archaeolgical and his- 
torical quarterlv, Jan. 1911. v. 10, p. 
123-133 ) 

Salem. The George Gardner house. 
By F. A. Gardner. (Massachusetts mag- 
azine, Oct. 1909. v. 2. p. 230-233.) 

The Roger Conant monument: 

plea for its location in Salem. By 
Lucie M. Gardner. (Massachusetts mag- 
azine, July, 1909. v. 2. p. 184-185.) 

Somerville. Historic leaves, published 
by the Somerville Historical Society. 
Volume VI-YIII. Somerville, 1907- 
1910. 3 v. (4 r.os. each.) 

Springfield. The secession of Spring- 
field from Connecticut. By S. E. Bald- 
win. (Colonial Society of Mass. Publica- 
tions. Boston, 1911. v. 12, p. 55-82.) 

Springfield, Mass. illustrated. By 

G. S. Graves. Springfield, G. S. Graves, 
1911 [96] p. 

Views and facts of Springfield, 

Mass. the Magnet city. Published by 
the Third National Bank [Springneld, 
1910]. [96] p. 

Sturbridge. Historical sketch of the 
First Congregational church, Sturbridge. 
ByG. H/ Hayr.es, Worcester. The Davis 
press, 1910. 68 p. 

Topsfield. Famous old Capen house, 
built in 1660. (Journal of American his- 
tory, 1st quarter, 1911. v. 5, p, 9J 



104 



THE MASSACHUSETTS MAGAZINE 



Truro. Records from the Old North 

Cemetery, Truro, Communicated by S. 

W. Smith. (Mavflower descendant, July- 

Oct. 1910. v. 12 p. 18G-1S7, 234-236.) 

Parts 2-3 (Collins-Freeman); series began in 

Jan. 1910. v. 12. p. 1. 

Watertown. Famous old Revere house, 
built in the early days of Colonial 
America. (Journal of American history, 
1st quarter, 1911. v. 5, p. 8.) 

Wellfleet Records from Duck Creek 
cemetery, Wellfleet. Inscriptions prior 
to 1851; communicated bv S. W. Smith 
and J. W. Willard. (Mayflower descend- 
ant, July, 1910. v. 1_\ p. 136-139.) 
Part 7 (Stone- Young) ; series be^an in July, 

1908. v. 10, p. 180. 

Records from the Cemetery near 

the South Wellfleet church. Inscriptions 
prior to 1851; communicated by S. W. 
Smith. (Mayflower descendant, Oct. 
1910. v. 12, p. 206-211.) 

West Boylston*. Vital records of West 
Bovlston, Mass. to the end of the vear 
1849. Worcester, F. P. Rice, 1911. 
153 p. 



Weston. The old Rand house. By Mrs. 
Caroline R. Hill. (Massachusetts maga- 
zine, July, 1909. v. 2. p. 165-167.) 

Weston. By D. S. Lamson ar.d J. 



N. McClintock. (Massachusetts maga- 
zine, July, 1909. v. 2, p. 129-140.) 

Worcester County. Colonel Ephraim 
Doolittle's regiment, 177.3. By F. A. 
Gardner. (Massachusetts magazine, Jan. 



1909. 



!9.) 



Most of the companies were from n rthern 
Worcester Count v. 



Colonel John Fellow's regiment, 

1775. By F. A. Gardner. (Massachu- 
setts magazine July, 1909. v. 2, p. 141- 
161.) 

Parts of two companies were raised in the 
county. 

Wrentham. Vital records of Wrentham, 
Mass. to the year 1850. Vol. II.-Mar- 
riage ar.d Deaths. Compiled bv T. W. 
Baldwin. Boston, 1910. 241-518 p. 
Vol. I. was pub. earlier in the year. 






— 



1 
















_ 






.... K3 . -' 












THE OLD WARREN HOUSE 

AT PLYMOUTH. 



By Francis R. Stoddard, Jr. 

One of the most interesting houses in the old town of Plymouth is that 
built by General John Winslow. It stands upon the corner of North and 
M ain streets and is known from the name of its later occupants as the 
Warren house. Even the land upon which the house is built has had an 
interesting history. 

According to the earliest records, the land was possessed by Nathaniel 
Morton who came in the ship Ann in 1623 and became Secretary of the 
Colony. Mr. Morton's wife was Julia, daughter of Alexander Carpen- 
ter, of Wrentham, England, whose daughter Alice was the second wife 
of Governor Bradford. In 1675 Mr. Morton sold the lot to John Wood 
or Atwood who was one of the earlier settlers at Pymouth. Mr. Wood 
was the husband of Sarah Masterson whose father was a member of John 
Robinson's congregation in Holland and later became Deacon of the 
Church at Plymouth. In 1685 Mr. Wood's son Nathaniel sold the lot to 
Nathaniel Clarke, an attorney-at-law, a member of Governor Andros 
Council, and Secretary of the Colony. Mr. Clarke married Dorothy, 
widow of Edward Gray, whose son Thomas, by her first husband, bought 
the property in 1698. In 1705 the land was sold to Thomas Little and 
in 1726 his heirs sold it to General John Winslow who built f 1 z house 
now standing. 

General John Winslow was fourth in descent from Edward Winslow 
one of the most prominent of the Pilgrims who came in the Mayflower in 
1620. He was the son of Judge Isaac Winslow of Marshtield and Sarah 
Wensley his wife. A history of the Winslow family can be more appro- 



106 THE MASSACHUSETTS MAGAZINE 

priately given in connection with a history of the Winslow house built by 
the General's younger brother, Edward. 

General Winslow was born in Marshfield in 1702 and became one of 
the foremost soldiers of the country. He was captain in the Cuba expe- 
dition in 1740. In 1754 ue was commander of an expedition to the Ken- 
nebec country. In 1755, as Colonel of Massachusetts troops, he gathered 
the inhabitants of the Arcadian villiage of Grand Pre in their church and 
sent them as prisoners to be scattered among the other English colonies. 
This event has been immortalized in Longfellow's beautiful poem Evange- 
line, but the impression therein conveyed of the peaceful attribuces of the 
Arcadians is not entirely true according to history. Francis Parkman, 
one of the most accurate of our historians, describes them as an ignorant 
and lawless people who, though for 42 years under English rule, were 
guilty of constant marauding and murders and of inciting the Indians 
against the English. It may be that all suffered for the faults of some, 
but the English had good cause for doing what they did. In 1756 Gen- 
eral Winslow was Commander-in-Chief at Fort William Henry and Com- 
mander of the Provincial forces sent against Crown Point. In 1758 and 
1759 ne was Major-General in the expedition against Canada. He was 
Councillor of the Province and held many offices of honor. His first wife 
was Mary daughter of Captain Issac Little of Pembroke. Late in life 
he married again a Mrs. Johnson ofHingham. In Pilgrim Hall, Ply- 
mouth, is a portrait of the General, in uniform. Near it is a portrait of 
his ancestor Governor Edward Winslow, the only one of a Pilgrim known 
to be in existence. Near these two is a portrait of the General's mother's 
mother, Mrs. Elizabeth Wensley, which is a fine picture of a gentle- 
woman of the 17th century. Through her the General was first cousin 
of the wife of Dr. William Thomas who owned and save his name to the 
old Thomas House. During the latter years of the General's life he did not 
continue to live in Plymouth. He sold the house to his nephew James 
Warren and moved to Hingham where he died in 1774. 

From the earliest times the Warren family has been noted in Plymouth. 
The first of the family was Richard Warren of good English stock who 
came in the Mayflower in 1620. His son Nathaniel was a Selectman ot 
Plymouth and represented the town in the General Court. His son James 



THE OLD WARREN HOUSE 107 

married Sarah Doty, grand-daughter of Edward Doty of the Mayflower, 
and was a large landowner in Plymouth. He was High Sheriff of Ply- 
mouth County, Justice of the Peace, Judge of the Court of Common 
Pleas, Justice of the Court of Oyer and Terminer, Representative for Ply- 
mouth in the General Court, and Captain in the militia. His son James 
was High Sheriff of Plymouth County, Justice of the Peace, Representa- 
tive in the General Court, and Colonel of Militia. He married Penelope 
Winslow, sister of General John Winslow. Their son James, who 
bought the old house from his uncle, graduated from Harvard in 1745. 
Before the Revolution he was most active in opposing the British and 
took a prominent part in the establishment of the system of committees of 
correspondence and safety. Like his father and grandfather, he was 
High Sheriff of Plymouth County and Representative in the General 
Court. After the death of General Joseph Warren at Bunker Hill, he 
was chosen to succeed him as President of the Provincial Congress. 
While the Revolutionary army was at Cambridge, he held the position of 
Paymaster-General. After the adoption of the national constitution, he 
was elected a Representative and later Speaker of the House. In 17S0, 
when Hancock was elected Governor of Massachusetts, General Warren 
was elected Lieutenant Governor but refused to serve. He was one of 
the most distinguished men of his day. 

He was married at Barnstable in 1754 to Mercy Otis, considered one 
of the most brilliant women ever produced by the State of Massachusetts. 
She was a daughter of James Otis of Barnstable, Judge of Probate, Chief 
Justice of the Court of Common Pleas, Speaker of the House of Repre- 
sentatives, and one of the Council Board during the first vearsofthe 
Revolution. He was a descendant of John Otis of Hingham. From her 
earliest days, Mrs. Mercy Warren took an active interest in the exciting 
political events through which she lived. She did all she could to aid the 
patriot cause, as did her brother, James Otis, the "Patriot." I can 
imagine no prouder title than this last. Mrs. Warren was so bright and 
ready with her pen that it is said she wrote some of the speeches of the 
members of the Convention called to adopt the Federal Constitution in 
1788. She wrote a history of the Revolution which was published in 
1805. In her description of John Adams, she depicted him as inclining 



-.'.■ 



108 THE MASSACHUSETTS MAGAZINE 

to aristocratic principles. This started a lively correspondence between 
them, which has been printed by the Massachusetts Historical Society. 
\Her letters were written in the old house, where she and her husband, 
with the exception of some time during the war, lived until their deaths. 
She was a lifelong friend of Martha Washington and of Abigail Adams. 
Upon the death of General and Mrs. Warren, title to the old house 
seems to have passed to their son James. During the Revolutionary 
war, he was an officer on board the "Alliance" during her foreign cruise 
in company with our French allies, and in the engagement with the Brit- 
ish ship "Serapis" in 1779, he was badly wounded. He died unmarried 
in 1821. When in Plymouth he may have stayed with his brother Henry 
who lived in the old house for many years. Henry Warren married his 
cousin Mary Winslow, grand-daughter of General John Winslow, who 
built the house. He w r as Collector of the Port of Plymouth and died in 
1828. Henry's son Winslow, a graduate of Harvard in the Class of 1S13 
and a well known physician of Plymouth, lived and had his office for 
many years in the old house. In 1832 the house and lot were sold to 
Nathaniel Russell of Plymouth. In 1833, Dr. Isaac LeBaron, a brother- 
in-law of Mr. Russell, moved into the Warren house and in 1836 con- 
tinued an apothecary business in the shop that Dr. Warren had vacated. 
The LeBaron family has always been of the greatest interest to stu- 
dents of Plymouth history. Francis LeBaron, first of the family, was 
an educated Frenchman wrecked in a privateer in Buzzard's Bay. As 
France was at war with England, he, with the other members of the 
crew, were taken prisoners to Plymouth on their way to Boston. There 
was no surgeon at the time in Plymouth and during his stay he volun- 
teered to perform a surgical operation upon a lady. It was so successful 
that as a result, the people of the town petitioned for his release from 
Governor Stoughton and that he might settle among them. When he 
first came to Plymouth, he could talk no English and, as the people 
spoke no French, he talked Latin with the Minister. Tradition says 
that he never told his real name and that "Baron" is but the title that he 
bore. He is the hero of a historical romance by Jane Austin, "The 
Nameless Nobleman." He settled in Plymouth where he married Mary, 
daughter of Edward Wilder of Hingham. 



THE OLD WARREN HOUSE 100 

Dr. Lazarus LeBaron, his son, was a distinguished physician. lie 
married Lydia Bradford, great-grand-daughter of the Governor. Durincr 
the^events leading up to the Revolution, he was one of the most active 
men in Plymouth upon the different Revolutionary committees which en- 
forced the measures deemed necessary by the patriots. He never lived 
to see the outbreak of hostilities. His son Isaac married Martha How- 
land, a descendant of John Howland of the Mayflower. Like many 
young men of the better class, Isaac had Tory leanings and radically 
differed from his father upon the burning questions of the dav. His 
opinions only had the effect of keeping him neutral. He lived and died 
in Plymouth, and was among the most prominent and respected of the 
town's residents. He was the father of Dr. Isaac LeBaron, who until his 
death in 1849, lived and had his shop in the old Warren house. The in- 
teresting history of the old structure ceases at this point. 

After the death of Nathaniel Russell, his heirs sold it to Allen Dan- 
forth from whom it passed to his son William S. Danforth. The latter's 
heirs, Allen and Sarah Danforth, later sold it to a syndicate represented 
by Benjamin A. Hathaway. During these last years, many people have 
occupied the old house for stores and dwelling, but have left no imprint 
on its history. The photograph which was taken by Mr. A. S. Burbank 
of Plymouth shows the old house as it is today. 



Jpprtanit of tht^ratriranXltDolutlan 



Frank A.Gar.dner.M. D.Edit 



State Sloop Winthrop. 

The efficiency of the vessels in the 
American Revolution was often entirely 
out of proportion to their size or rig and so 
we find this little sloop, noted in many 
ways, doing exceedingly valuable service 
for the state in the later years of the war. 
Paullin in his "Xavy of the American 
Revolution," states that Captain Little in 
this vessel, captured and sent into Boston, 
"nearly the whole of the armed force they 
(the British) possessed at Penobscot," 
thus retrieving in part the honor of the 
State. She was further noted as being 
the last vessel in the State navy in the 
Revolution. 

Her first officers were as follows: Cap- 
tain George Little, date of entry, March 
4, 1782. Lieutenant Edward Preble, date 
of entry, February 5, 1782. Master 
Thomas Robb, date of entry, May 4, 1782. 
Lieut. Marines Jabez Hatch, date of entry, 
May 4, 1782. Surgeon John Sprague, date 
of entry, May 4, 1782. 

CAPTAIN GEORGE LITTLE served 
first as Second Lieutenant on the privateer 
brigantine "Active." This vessel was 
owned in Boston and a petition was pre- 
sented October 2, 1777, to have John Foster 
Williams commissioned Captain. The "Ac- 
tive" was captured and Lieutenant Little's 
name appears in a list of prisoners sent 
from Newport, Rhode Island, in the prison 
ship "Lord Sandwich" which arrived at 
Bristol, March 7, 1778. June 23, 1778, he 
was engaged as Master of the State brigan- 
tine "Hazard." October 15, of the same 
year he became Second Lieutenant on the 
same vessel and April 21, 1779, was pro- 



moted to the rank of First Lieutenant. He 
served in the "Hazard" until she was 
burned at Penobscot to prevent her falling 
into the hands of the enemy. (See 
"Massachusetts Magazine" v. I, p. 195.) 
He became First Lieutenant on the State 
ship "Protector," commanded by Captain 
John Foster Williams, October 14, 1779, 
and held that rank on her when she was 
captured, May 5, 1781. He returned from 
captivity and was discharged, November 
14, 1781. (See ''Massachusetts Maga- 
zine," v. Ill, p. 183. ) He became Captain 
of the State sloop "Winthrop," March 4, 
17S2. 

LIEUTENANT EDWARD PREBLE, 
destined to become one of the most famous 
naval officers who ever served under the 
American flag, was appointed an acting 
midshipman on board the State ship 
"Protector," Captain John Foster Williams, 
April 4, 1780. He was captured in her 
and his return was effected through the 
influence of a royalist, Colonel William 
Tyng, a former friend and associate in 
arms of his father. Lieutenant Preble was 
the son of General Jedediah and Mehitable 
(Bangs) Preble. His father General Jede- 
diah, began life as a sailor and, in 1746, be- 
came captain in a provincial regiment. He 
settled in Portland about 174S. He served 
as lieutenant-colonel under General Wins- 
low in Acadia in 1 755, became colonel March 
13, 1758 and brigadier-general March 12, 
1 759. He was commissioned brigadier-gen- 
eral by the Provincial Congress of Massa- 
chusetts, October 27, 1774, and was later 
made major-general but declined the honor 
on account of age. He was judge of the 



DEPARTMENT OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION 



111 



court of common pleas in 177S, and a 
member oi the State senate in 17S0. The 
son Edwarfi was born in Portland, August 
15, 1761. He ran away from home at the 
age of seventeen and shipped on a privat- 
eer. On his return he was appointed acting 
midshipman as above stated, on the Massa- 
chusetts State ship "Protector." He was 
engaged as lieutenant on the State sloop 
"Winthrop," February 5, 17S2. 

MASTER THOMAS ROBB served as 
seaman on the State brigantine "Massa- 
chusetts," Captain John Foster Williams, 
from January 20, to February 17, 1777. 
He was engaged as master of the "Win- 
throp," May 4, 17S2. 

LIEUTENANT OF MARINES JABEZ 
HATCH was sergeant of marines on the 
State ship "Protector" from November 30, 
1779, to November 28, 17S0. On the fol- 
lowing day he was promoted lieutenant 
and he was so rated until his return from 
captivity, February 25, 17S2. May 4, 
1782, he was engaged as lieutenant of 
marines on the State sloop "Winthrop." 

SURGEON JOHN SPRAGUE of Mai- 
den, was engaged May 1, 1775, as surgeon's 
mate in Colonel Ebenezer Bridge's Regi- 
ment. A full record of his service through 
the war has been given in the "Massachu- 
setts Magazine," v. II, p. 213. He was 
engaged May 4, 17S2, surgeon on the 
State sloop "Winthrop." 

April 30, 1782, the Navy Board, recom- 
mended to the House of Representatives 
that ten four-pound cannon be provided 
for the "Winthrop." 

May 2, 17S2. 

".Resolve on the Representation of Caleb 
Davis, Esq., respecting the ship Tartar 
and sloop Winthrop, and appointing a 
committee_to settle the accounts of the 
late board of war, and granting five thou- 
sand pounds to said Caleb Davis Esq. 



On the representation of Caleb Davis Esq. 
agent for this Commonwealth, 

Resolved, That the said agent be, and 
he is hereby directed, to fit out with all 
possible dispatch, the ship Tartar and 
sloop Winthrop for sea, to be employed for 
the protection of the coasts of this Com- 
monwealth," etc. 

"June 12, 17.82. 

Ordered that Mr. Otis, Mr. Hill & Colo 
Grow, be a Committee to enquire of his 
Excellency the Governor why the Sloop 
Winthrop which the agent has represented 
to be fit for sea has not sailed. 

The Committee reported that they were 
informed that said Sloop waited for the 
Orders of his Excelly the Governor. 
Thereupon faid Committee were directed 
to enquire of his Excelly the reason of said 
Sloops not going to sea." 

June 19, 17S2, the Governor sent the 
Secretary "to acquaint them that from the 
daily intelligence he had received he 
thought it unfit to fend the Sloop Win- 
throp to sea 8c that he would fend them a 
written mefsage on that subject as foon 
as his indisposition would permit him." 

The "Winthrop" carried 13 guns and 
thirty-five men on this cruise, capturing 
two letter of marque ships and other 
vessels, and doing much to retrieve the 
loss inflicted by the British at Penobscot 
in 1779. The courage and daring of her 
officers led them into many hazardous 
encounters from which they fortunately 
escaped unharmed or, as more often 
happened, came out victorious. The auth- 
or of the "Preble Genealogy" narrates one 
of these as follows: "While cruising in the 
waters of Maine, Captain Little ascertained 
that an armed brig lay at anchor near 
Castine under cover of the guns of the 
British post there; and a design was formed 
to run the Winthrop alongside in the night 
and carry her by surprise. Preble was to 
lead the boarders, consisting of forty picked 



112 



THE MASSACHUSETTS MAGAZINE 



men, dressed in white frocks, that friend 
might be distinguished from foe. The 
bold measure was successfully executed. 
The Winthrop ran alongside. Preble, with 
fourteen of his force gained the deck of the 
brig, but the Winthrop's way was so rapid, 
and she passed the brig so quickly that the 
remaining twenty-six were unable to get 
on board, and he was left with this small 
force to contend with the foe as he best 
could. Little hailed him and asked if he 
would have more men. 'Xo' was Preble's 
cool reply, 'we have more than we want, 
we stand in each other's way.' Deceived 
by this declaration, the crew of the brig 
were panic-stricken • and some of them 
leaped overboard, while the officers were 
instantly sought in the cabin by Preble in 
person, and called to surrender, as resis- 
tance was useless, and would cause the 
loss of their lives. The prize having been 
secured, was worked out to sea under a 
severe fire from the shore batteries, and 
was safely taken to Boston." Paullin in 
his "Navy of the American Revolution" 
states that the "Winthrop" captured and 
sent into Boston "nearly the whole of the 
armed force they possessed at Penobscot." 

The cruise was so successful that thir- 
teen days before it was ended the following 
resolution was passed in the House of Rep- 
resentatives : "Resolved, That his Excel- 
lency the Governor be requested to order 
the sloop Winthrop to continue her cruize 
on the coast of this Commonwealth, for 
the protection of the trade thereof, so long 
as the season will admit of her being 
serviceable for the said purpose; after 
which to be hauled up until the season 
may admit of her being employed in com- 
pany with the vessel before directed to be 
purchased or obtained for the protection 
of the trade of the commonwealth." 

The cruise ended November 25, 1782 
and on the following day all of the officers 
which we have named in the above list 
entered for the second cruise. 



DOCTOR'S MATE JOHN LEVERETT 
was engaged December 5, 1762. He had 
nD record of any previous service. 

December 17, 1782, a warrant for 
£714:15:06 1-2 was issued to Captain 
Little for the pay roll of the "Winthrop." 

January 31, 1783. "Ordered that Mr. 
Sedgwick, Gen'l Ward & Mr. Frazier be a 
committee to consider the Refolves which 
have been passed relative to the station- 
ing of the Sloop Winthrop & to consider 
of her present fituation as reported by the 
late Agent & report." 

February 1, 17S3. "Ordered that Gen'l 
Ward, Mr. Sedgwick & Colo Dawes be a 
committee to deliver the following mefsage 
to his Excelly the Governor. Viz. 

May it please your Excellency. The 
House of Representatives request your 
Excellency to be informed by Mefsuage, 
whether the Sloop Winthrop hath sailed, 
& if so, what was her destination & what 
orders were given to the Captain?" 

"February 3, 17S3. 

Gentlemen of the House of Representa- 
tives. 

In consequence of your Mefsage just 
now received I am to inform you that the 
Sloop Winthrop sometime fince failed 
upon a cruize under my orders copy of 
which I have directed the Secretary to 
lay before you agreeable to your request. 

John Hancock. 
Council Chamber, Feby 1, 17S3." 

February 5, 1783. "The Committee on 
the Governor's reply to the Message re- 
specting the Sloop Winthrop, reported that 
the following message be presented to the 
House to his Excellency, viz, 

May it please your Excellency. Your 
Excellency having been pleased in your 
mefsage of Saturday last, in pursuance of 
the request of the House to lay before us 
the orders which you gave the Captain of 
the Sloop Winthrop & to inform the House 
that she had sailed on pursuance of those 



s 



<v '.VX>'.-ij 



DEPARTMENT OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION 



113 



Orders which appears to be in direct oppo- 
sition to a Resolve of the General Court of 
the eleventh of November last (of which 
your Excellency was pleased to approve) 
As Guardian of the rights & property of 
the citizens of this commonwealth, it is 
our duty to exprefs the sense we entertain 
of this measure which we conceive your 
Excellency was not authorized to take & 
which cannot be justified. Which was 
read and after debate was referred* to the 
morning." 

February 6, 17S3. "The House pro- 
ceeded on the consideration of the report 
of the Committee of the Govn's message 
respect'g the Sloop Winthrop and a motion 
being made the question was put whether 
a message should be sent to his Excelly 
the Governor which pafsed in the affirm- 
ative. The following Mefsage was pre- 
pared & Voted to be sent, viz. 

May it please your Excellency, Your 
Excellency having in your mefsage of 
Saturday last laid before the House a copy 
of the Orders given by you to the Capt of 
the Sloop Winthrop you cannot we pre- 
sume be surprised when you compare these 
orders with a resolve of the Genl Court 
pafsed Nov. 11, 17S2 approved by yourself, 
that the House feels anxious to be informed 
upon what principles your Excellency has 
thought yourself authorized to give such 
Orders. 

The House ever disposed to harmonize 
with the supreme Executive of the State, 
and entertaining all proper respect for 
your Excellency, yet as Guardians of the 
rights and safety of their constituents feel 
themselves constrained by this duty to 
make this enquiry. Some late informa- 
tion from the Eastern Shore make us 
apprehensive that the measure taken by 
your Excellency may prove very injurious 
to the safety of that part of the State, but 
the apparent interference of the Executive, 
in the instance with the rights of the 



Legislature gives us much more serious 
concern an 1 we are satisfied your Excel- 
lency must concur in sentiment that when 
such an interference appears, it is the duty 
of Government to pay immediate attention 
to it, and we are also satisfied that your 
Excelly will feel the propriety of entering 
into an explanation of this matter that 
undue jealousies may not arise between 
the Legislature & Executive or subsist in 
the minds of the good people of this State 
as to the supposed encroachment of either 
of them. 

It was then Ordered that Mr. Lowell, 
Mr. Dwight, Mr. Sedgwick, Mr. Otis & 
Genl Ward be a committee to prefent faid 
message." 

February 7, 1783. "The Secretary 
brought down the following mefsage from 
his Excelly, viz. 
Gentlemen of the House of Representatives. 

The principles held up in your mefsage 
which I received this day I most sincerely 
accord in & had thofe principles been in 
any one instance by me designedly op- 
posed and counteracted, I should not feel 
myself free from a liablenefs to censure. 
It has ever been & ever will be my ftudy 
both in public and private life, strictly to 
adhere to the principles of the constitution, 
nor can I charge myself with a deviation 
from them. True it is, that after the 
receipt of your mefsage I was convinced 
of the existance of the Resolve you refer 
to in it, refpecting the Sloop Winthrop, & 
had I been imprefsed with the particulars 
of the Resolve at the time I gave the orders 
to the commander of that Sloop, I most 
afsuredly should have observed a different 
line of conduct respecting the destination 
of the Vefsell, & I flatter myself that when 
my then unfortunate situation is taken 
into contemplation, that I was confined to 
my bed, & the Secretary obliged to sit 
by me, and from time to time read the 
Resolves, the House of Representatives 



114 



THE MASSACHUSETTS MAGAZINE 



will not so much wonder that I could not 
imprefs my mind with the course of public 
business nor pay that attention to it, as 
was usual with me in a state of sound 
health & those circumstances will plead 
my apology for not recollecting the Re- 
solve that at the time of giving the order 
I was confined to my chamber. 

With respect to the particular orders I 
gave, I was induced from several motives 
to frame them as I did. The applications 
that were made to me in behalf of the 
Commander Capt. Little, whose great 
exertions and success on the Eastern 
Coast had recommended him to the notice 
of the Public, & I must confefs had a great 
effect upon me. I considered that he had 
most efsentially prevented the deprada- 
tions on that coast by capturing & sending 
into this Port near the whole of the arm'd 
force they pofsefsed at Penobscot & that 
the season was fast advancing when it 
would be impofsible for him or the enemy 
to keep the sea upon the Eastern Coast & 
wishing that the Commonwealth & him- 
self might be benefitted by the capture of 
some prizes, I determined that he should 
proceed first to the Eastern Shore & if he 
found no enemy there, I consented he 
should take a course off Bermudas, or run 
to the West Indies, in hopes that the 
Commonwealth as well as himself might 
find 'an interest in the confequences of his 
course, & after cruising a limited time, I 
directed him to return to the Eastern 
Coast which would be at the season when 
she might be useful there. No personal 
motives, no private views, no wish to in- 
fringe the prerogatives of the Legislature 
influenced me, nor had I any other motive 
but the general good. 

Thus Gentlemen I have given you a 
state of the matter referred to in your 
message & can't but flatter myself, cir- 
cumstances considered, I shall stand free 
from any imputation with respect to my 



conduct as to the orders given to the 
commander of ye Sloop, as I really feel a 
consciousness that I had in this instance 
as in all others the public weal in view. 
Boston, Feb. 1G, 1783. John Hancock." 

It was voted the next day that the 
Governor's reply, "lie upon the files of the 
House." 

The following entry is found in the 
"Journal of the House of Representatives," 
under date of March 17, 1783: 

"A petition from George Little, Comman- 
der of the Sloop Winthrop praying for a 
supply of Sea Cloaths for his crew. Read 
& committed to Capt Wales, Colonel 
Thorndike & Mr. Bartlett." 

The cruise ended March 17, 17S3, and 
was evidently successful, as the following 
under date of March 21, will show: 

"A Resolve directing the Treasurer to 
appropriate the prize money from the 
cruize of the Sloop Winthrop to the Com- 
monwealth for the payment of the wages 
of the crew of said Sloop. Read & 
passed." 

A warrant for £262:12:08 was issued to 
Captain Little and officers of the sloop 
"Winthrop" for services on the above 
sloop from November 26, 17S2, to March 
17, 1783, inclusive. 

The same officers entered service for the 
next and last cruise of the "Winthrop," 
March 17, 1873. 

In the "Journal of the House," we read: 

"The Secry came down with the follow- 
ing message from his Excelly the Gover- 
nor viz : 

Gentm of the Senate & Gentm of the 
House of Representatives. Upon the 
arrival of the armed Sloop Winthrop in 
this port from her cruize, I gave early 
directions to the Corny General to fit as 
quick as pofsible the said Sloop for the sea 
that she might be employed for the pro- 
tection of the Eastern Coast, by a letter I 
have this dav received from the Corny 



DEPARTMENT OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION 



115 



Genl which I have directed the Secy to 

lay before you, I find the Corny is not able 

to compleat the businefs without further 

means. I am therefore under the necefsity 

of requesting the attention of the Genl 

Court to the situation of the Sloop, as 

with their aid the Sloop may be at sea in a 

few days. 

John Hancock. 

Council Chamber, Boston, March 24, 17S3." 

"Resolve on the petition of George Little 
making an appropriation of the prize 
money in his hands, and establishing the 
pay of his officers and men. 

On the petition of George Little, comman- 
der of the State sloop of war called the Win- 
throp, praying that the prize money in his 
hands, belonging to this Commonwealth, may 
be appropriated for the payment of the wages 
due the officers and men belonging to the 
sloop aforesaid; also that the wages of the 
officers and men may be raised to the same 
pay as the officers and men are in the Conti- 
nental navy; 

Resolved That the pray of the petition 
be granted, and the prize money in Capt. 
Little's hands be paid into the public 
treasury, the said Capt. George Little taking 
duplicate receipts therefor, one of which 
to be lodged in the Secretary's office, 
and that the Treasurer be, and he hereby 
is directed, to pay the wages due to the 
crew of the sloop Winthrop out of the same. 

It is further Resolved, That from and 
after this date, the officers and men belong- 
ing to the sloop aforesaid, be put on the 
same establishment as the officers and men 
are in the Continental navy in vessel s 
carrying the like number of guns." 
Acts and Resolves, March 22, 17S3. 

March 26, 1783. "The Hon. Mr. Stark- 
weather brought down a Resolve making 
an establishment for the Officers & crew 
of the Sloop Winthrop. In Senate. Sent 
down for concurrence. Read and con- 
curred." 



"Resolved, that there be paid out of the 
treasury of this Commonwealth to Richard 
Devens, Esq., Commissary General, the 
sum of twelve hundred pounds, out of the 
proceeds of the sales of ye said ship Tartar 
for the purpose of enabling him to fit out 
the sloop Winthrop. 

March 26, 1783." 

"As there were no vessels in the Conti- 
nental navy of like number of guns, the 
part of the resolve of March 22, 1783, 
relating to said establishment was repealed 
March 26, 17S3." 

Act and Resolves, 17S2-3, p. 483. 

This cruise ended in June 1783, and 
Captain Little received his discharge on the 
23d of that month. A warrant for pay of 
the officers of the "Winthrop" bears date 
of June 30, 17S3. 

"Resolved, That Richard Devens, Esq., 
Commissary General, be and hereby is, 
directed to sell at public auction (after 
giving sutable notice thereof) the sloop 
Winthrop, with all her appurtenances, 
except her guns and military stores, for 
the most the same will fetch; and pay the 
proceeds into the public treasury of this 
Commonwealth, taking duplicate receipts 
therefor one of which to be lodged in the 
Secretary's office; the said proceeds to 
remain for the further order of the General 
Court. June 4, 1783." 

The last reference to the "Winthrop" in 
the archives is the following: 

"Boston, February 9, 1785. 

This Certifies that Capt. George Little 
was Charged in Dec. 1782 with £173 Cash 
for advance wages for the crew of Sloop 
Winthrop, also the sum of £206:09:00 for 
Cloathing for Said Crew as appears by 
my accounts. 

Caleb Davis." 

The "Winthrop" was the last vessel in 
commission in the Massachusetts State 
Navy and therefore no further service in 
the Revolution was seen by its officers. 



116 



THE MASSACHUSETTS MAGAZINE 



LIEUTEXAXT EDWARD PREBLE 
had such an eminently notable career later 
that we must briefly review it. His service 
on the "Winthrop" was last mentioned in 
a warrant dated April 30, 17S3. 

Upon the organization of the United 
States Navy he was one of the first five 
to be commissioned as lieutenants, Febru- 
ary 9, 1798. He served as "acting cap- 
tian" of the brig "Pickering" and was 
commissioned captain, May 15, 1799, com- 
manding the "Essex" on a cruise to China, 
when he .convoyed a fleet of fourteen 
merchantmen valued at many millions. 
He married Mary Deering in 1 SOI. In 
May 1803 he commanded the "Constitu- 
tion," and the squadron to operate against 
the Barbary States. His accomplishments 
there form one of the most brilliant pages 
in American naval history. His biogra- 
pher in "Appleton's Encyclopaedia of 
American Biography," refers to the subject 
as follows: . 

"Preble's strict discipline, prudent and 
energetic measures and preseverance are 
demonstrated by the details of this series 
of the most gallant attacks that are re- 
corded in naval history. Xo gun was fired 
against Tripoli after he left. His opera- 
tions resulted in the peace signed June 3, 
1805, by which tribute that European 
nations had paid for centuries, and the 
slavery of Christian captives; were abolish- 
ed. His officers wrote a letter expressing 
their esteem and affection, he was given an 
enthusiastic welcome on his return, and 
congress gave him a vote of thanks and an 
emblematical gold medal. He was the 
first officer to receive a vote of thanks 
after the adoption of the constitution." 
He had done more "for the cause of Christi- 
anity, in a short space of time, than the 
most powerful nations of Christendom had 
done for centuries." In 1S06 Jefferson 
offered him a seat in the cabinet at the 
head of the navy department, but feeble 



health prevented his acceptance. He 
returned to Portland where he died of 
consumption, August 25, 1807. At the 
time of his death he had nearly completed 
his mansion, the present "Preble House" 
in Portland. 



Naval Song of the American Revolution. 

We are indebted to Mr. George Francis 
Dow of the Essex Institute for the follow- 
ing clipping, "An Old Song," from the 
Salem Gazette of December 28, 1866. We 
also give the editorial comment of the 
Gazette of that date. 

AN OLD SONG. 



Describing Battles fought during the Revo- 
lutionary War, by a Salem Privateer, com- 
manded by Capt. Hawthorne, and two British 
men of war. The officers and crew of the 
Privateer belonged in Salem, and the song 
was composed by one of the crew during 
the cruise. 

Attend, ye sons of freedom, 

That wish your country's good. 

To the history of a privateer 

That drenched herself in blood. 

Fighting for her country's good; 

With carriage guns but ten, 

All manned with jovial hearts of gold, 

Called true Americans. 



Brave Hawthorne was commander, 

A man of real worth; 

Old England's cruel tyrrany 

Induced us to go forth. — 

Who with relentless fury 

Were plundering all our coasts, 

And thought because her strength was great 

Our glorious cause was lost. 

But boast not, haughty Briton, 

With proud indignity; 

By land your conquering armies. 

Your matchless power by sea. 

Were taught by numerous instances 

Americans can fight; 

With valor unimpeached they stand. 

Your armies put to night. 

On the 22d of August, 

Just at the close of day. 

All hands on board the privateer 

And got her under weigh 

We kept the eastern shore in sight, 

Full 40 leagues or more; 

Then our departure took to sea 

From the Isle of Monhegan shore. 



DEPARTMENT OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION 



117 



Farewell to fair America. 

Farewell to friends and wives; 

We trust in God's paternal power 

For to protect our lives. 

And prosper our fraternal cruise 

Upon the raping main. 

And to preserve our dearest friends 

Till we return again. 



She mounted 16 carriage guns, 

Fought near 100 men. 

With muskets, spears and pistols; 

But oh, the dreadful scene! 

The piles of dead lav on her deck, 

The wounded's horrid groans. 

Blood running from her scuppers, 

The blood of England's sons. 



The wind was in our favor, 

It bore us on our way 

As far along to the southward 

As the Gulf of Florida. 

There we fell in with a British ship, 

Bound homeward from the Main; 

We gave them two bow chasers, 

And they returned the same. 



Our case was not so dismal 
It fully did appear. 
But sudden death did enter 
On board the privateer: 
Mahany, Crow, and Clemency, 
The valiant and the brave. 
Fell glorious in the contest 
And met a watery grave. 



We hauled up our courses, 

And so prepared to fight, 

The contest held five glasses. 

Until the dusk of night. 

We having sprung our mainmast. 

We had so large a sea, 

Fell back astern and left the chase 

Till the returning day. 



Ten other men were wounded 
Amongst our warlike crew: 
Amongst the rest our captain. 
To whome all praise is due; 
To whom with all our Officers, 
We'll give a hearty cheer: 
Success to brave America, 
And our good privateer. 



Next day we fixed our mainmast, 
The ship still being nigh; 
All hands were for engaging 
Once more the chase to try; 
But winds and seas were boisterous, 
Our cannons would not bear; 
We thought it quite imprudent, 
And so we left her there. 



And now. to end my story; 

Just at the present cruise. 

Praises which Heaven assigns us 

Are taken for that use. 

Ships of superior force we fought; 

Could we have then done more? 

We'll tack about and shape our course. 

For Freedom's pleasant shore. 



We steered to the eastward, 

Near coasts of Portugal, 

In latitude of 27 

We espied a lofty sail. 

We gave her chase, soon did perceive 

She was a British snow, 

Standing for far America 

With troops for General Howe. 

Our captain did inspect her 

With glasses, and he said, 

My boys, she means to fight us, 

But be you not afraid; 

All hands repair to quarters, 

See everything is clear. 

And give her a broadside, my boys, 

As soon as she comes near. 



She was prepared with nettings, 

Her men were well secured; 

She bore directly for us. 

And put us close on board; 

While cannons roared like thunder, 

And muskets fired amain. 

And soon she was along our side 

And grappled to our chain. 

And now the scene is altered; 

The cannons cease to roar; 

We fought with spears and muskets 

One glass and some time more, 

Till British pride and glory 

They dare no longer stay, 

They cut the Yankees' grappling chains 

And quickly bore away. 



"The Privateersman's Song." on our first 
page, is a genuine relic of the revolution. 
It was handed to us, some time ago. by one 
of our subscribers in a country town, who 
had taken it down from the lips of an aged 
relative, as she had recited or sung it. It 
appears to us well worthy of the space it 
occupies. 

The exploits of Captain Haraden. as a 
naval hero in the War of Independence, are 
well known, and have long shed lustre upon 
our public history and local annals. Who 
the commander was. whose daring adven- 
tures are related in this privateersman's song 
on our first page, is not so well known, and 
is a question worthy of solution. We com- 
mend it to the researches of our antiquarian 
students of the Essex Institute. The Haw- 
thornes were an original and always eminent 
Salem family. 

There is. to be sure, but little poetical 
elegance or merit in this piece, but it is a 
valuable addition to the memorabilia of this 
old seaport, and an interesting curiosity. 
Such popular ballads ougrht to be preserved. 
They performed an effective part in the con- 
flict between Great Britain and her colonies 
and breathed the spirit of life into our youth- 
ful marine power. They have, indeed, con- 
tributed much to the naval supremacy of 
both nations. Sung in chorus in the fore- 
castles of men-of-war, on wharves, or at 
ship taverns, they have kindled and kept 
alive the flames of patriotism, where they 
have ever burned most brightly, in the 
breasts of our brave and heroic sailors. 

The homeliness of their diction, rudeness 



118 



THE MASSACHUSETTS MAGAZINE 



of their measure, and unstudied freedom of 
their style, constitute, perhaps, an element 
of their power. Many otner important en- 
terprises, and gallant achievements, besides 
those recorded in these lines, have been 
preserved to history, borne down in such 
songs. The earliest poems in the world's 
history, were composed as songs, to be sung, 
and are the richest treasures of all time. 
Such productions as the one here presented. 
having no pretensions to classic elegance, 
have afforded elements of national character. 
and saved from oblivion much of what we 
know of the past. — Euitor. 



The Captain "Hawthorne" referred to 
was Captain Daniel Hathorne, of Salem. 
He was the son of Joseph and Sarah 
(Bowditch) Hathorne, grandson of Judge 
John Hathorne of Witchcraft fame, and 
great-grandson of Major William Ha- 
thorne. Captain Daniel was born in Salem 
about 1731. He married, October 21, 1756, 
Rachel Phelps. His son, Nathaniel, mar- 
ried Elizabeth Clarke Manning, daughter 
of Robert Manning. They were the par- 
ents of Nathaniel Hawthorne, the distin- 
guished author. 

A petition dated Salem, August 5, 1776, 
signed by Benjamin Goodhue and Miles 
Greenwood, both of Salem, in behalf of 
themselves and others, requested that Cap- 
tain Daniel Hathorne be commissioned 
commander of the schooner "True Ameri- 



can" (privateer). He received his com- 
mission and sailed on the cruise described 
in the above composition. A note in 
Force's American Archives, 5-II, p. 1227, 
states that he arrived at Salem October 
23, 1776, from a cruise, having fought an 
armed packet for two hours, had three 
men killed and nine or ten wounded (him- 
self slightly). Since then the note states 
that she "has taken and sent in a prize 
snow with oats." 

A letter dated November 14, 1776, stated 
that "on Saturday last," a ship captured 
by Captain Daniel Hathorne arrived at 
Marblehead. 

Captain Hathorne arrived home in this 
ship November 10, 1776, from a cruise, 
having taken and sent in four or five 
prizes. He was succeeded as commander 
of this "True American" December 3, 
1776, by Captain William Carlton, of 
Salem. A Captain Hathorne commanded 
the snow " Wasp " in 1776. No fur- 
ther record of Captain Daniel Hathorne's 
naval service can be found, but he was 
probably the man of that name who was 
commissioned captain of a matross com- 
pany in the First Essex County Regiment, 
August 6, 1777. Captain Hathorne died 
April 18, 1796.— F. A. C] 



A Continuation of the Genealogical Dictionary of Essex County Families, compiled until 
Oct., 19J9, by Sidney Perley, Esq.. in The Essex Antiquarian. 

JTamtlg (!ktt£alngt£s 

LUCIE MARION GARDNER, A.B., Editor 

Essex wa* the first county settled in the Massachusetts Bav Colony, and all thereconls of early Massachusetts families 

found in the probate, court and town records of this county prior to the vear N.i arc gathered 

and published here in alphabetical form, and arrsneed srenealosicaUV when portable. 



2 9 

Deacon John Burnam 4 son of John and 
Sarah Burnam was born probably about 
1685. He was a yeoman by occupation and 
lived in Chebacco. He inherited from his 
father the northerly or northeasterly half of 
the large farm lying between the creek and 
the Gloucester line with "housings, edifices, 
buildings, fences, and fruit trees, etc., etc." 
also other parcels of marsh and thatch land. 
He was called "deacon" in a deed dated 
April 13, i74i.(See Essex deeds 83-183.) 
He married first int. October 21, 17 10, Anne 
"Chote" daughter of Thomas and Mary 
(Varney) Choate. She was born May 22, 
1691 and died August 15, 1739. Thomas 
Choate in his will dated February 20, 1743, 
left to the female heirs of his daughter Anna 
one-fifth part of all his household effects 
[Essex Piob. files 5382]. He married, second, 
October 9, 1740 widow Elizabeth Goodhue. 
She was the daughter of John 3 (John 1 , 
Samuel 2 ) and Lydia (Herrick) Porter of 
Wenham. She married -first (intention 
recorded Ipswich, December 2, 1710) 
Daniel "Gillbert." He died in Ipswich, 
December 2, 1710. She married second, 
November, 1727, Sergeant Joseph 
Goodhue. He died in Ipswich, July 21, 
1739. Hedied November 24, 1749. In his will 
dated November 15, 1745, probated Decem- 
ber 25, 1749, he gave to his wife Elizabeth, 
"all such privileges in my estate as the law 
directs." He left various sums of money to 
his daughters, Anne Burnum, wife of Josiah 
Burnum; Mary Andrews, wife of John 



Andrews; Abigail Choate, wife of Humphrey 
Choate, and Sarah Andrews wife of James 
Andrews. He left to his grandson John 
Burnam, £35:00:00 having already paid 
£65:00:00 on account of the boy's father, 
John Burnum, deceased. To his son Nehe- 
miah Burnam, he gave £164:00:00 having 
already paid him £120:00:00. To his son, 
Jeremiah Burnam, he left £5:00:00 as he had 
already had his portion. To his son Samuel, 
he left "the Rest & Remainder of my Whole 
estate both real & personal" except the 
household goods which he gave to his 
daughters. The inventory dated December 
2-;, 1749, showed personal estate valued at 
£208:00:00 and real estate about one hun- 
dred forty acres was valued with buildings 
thereon at £1506:05:00. 

Children, all by his wife Anna: 
70 — John 5 . See below. 
71 — Samuel 5 , b. abt. 1717. See below. 
72 — Jeremiah 5 . See below. 
73 — Axxe 5 , she married, April 3, 1740, Josiah 
Burnum, son of Josiah [36] and Elizabeth 
(Butler) Burnam. [See 97] 
74 — Mary 5 , married January 5, 1 741-2, John 
Andrews, 3d, son of John and Elizabeth 
(Wallis) Andrews. He was born about 17 17. 
She died before March 1, 1747-8 as he mar- 
ried, second, Martha Cogswell on that date. 
[Essex Antiquarian, Vol. Ill, P. 100-1.] 
75 — Xehemiah 5 . See below. 
76 — Abigail 5 , married November 24. 1743, Ens. 
Humphrey Choate, son of Thomas and 
Elizabeth (Burnham) Choate, He was b. 
Nov. 9, 1720. She d. before 1752. He m. 
2d, July 9, 1752, Ruth Lufkin, dau. of 
Thomas' and Rachel (Riggsj Lufkin. He d. 
Aug. 25, 1795. 
77 — Sarah 5 , married Sept. 2, 1745, James An- 
drews, son of John and Elizabeth (Wallis) 



120 



THE MASSACHUSETTS MAGAZINE 



Andrews. She survived him and was his 
widow in 1762. [Essex Antiquarian, Vol. 
Ill, P. IOI.l 



30 
Thomas Burnam 4 called "third" was the 
son of John and Sarah Burnam. He was 
born about 16S6. He was a weaver by trade. 
He inherited from his father the southerly 
or south-westerly end of the large farm be- 
tween the Gloucester line and the creek, be- 
sides many other parcels of salt marsh and 
other land. He married, November 22, 
1712, in Ipswich, Hannah (Goodhue) Cogs- 
well, daughter of Lieut. John and Hannah 
Cogswell of Chebacco. She was born March 
27, 1693. He died suddenly March 31, 
1742 ae 56 years. The coroner, Philip Dane, 
was called and held an inquest, receiving later 
the amount of £4 for conducting the same. 
The inventory of his estate dated May 12, 
1742 showed personal property amounting to 
£1211:03:00. The real estate was valued 
£2225:00:00 including the homestead con- 
sisting of 80 acres of land with dwelling-house, 
etc. In the division of the personal estate, 
his widow received her third amounting to 
£226:13:03^. His elder son, Francis, re- 
ceived two shares amounting to £151:02:02} 
and his four other children Thomas, Sarah, 
.Hannah, and Racher£75:n:oi-§- each. In 
the division of the real estate, . Francis re- 
ceived the old homestead with dwelling-house, 
barn, etc., between Clark's Creek and the 
Gloucester line together with many other 
parcels of land. Thomas received "the 
whole of the homestead of the land lying on 
the northerly side of the Chebacco River, with 
the dwelling house, barns, etc," besides other 
lands including a lot south of Francis' por- 
tion which was bounded on the east by the 
Gloucester line and on the south by the 
school farm. [Essex deeds 1 25-1 11]. His 
widow married, second, November 9, 1743, 
Capt. Thomas Choate, son of John and 
Anne Choate. 



Children: 

;S — FRANCIS 5 . See below. 

79 — Thomas 6 , bap. October 9, 1726. See below. 

80 — Hannah 3 , married [int. November 22, 1744] 
Lieut. Nathan Burnam, son of Thomas [54J 
and Susannah Burnam. He was killed in 
the battle of Ticonderoga Julv 8, 1758. 

81— Sarah 3 , born 1720, died June 9, 17S3, 
aged about 60 years. 

S2 — Rachel"', bap. August 2, 1730, married Jan- 
uary 1, 1 75 1-2, Joseph Andrews, son of 
Joseph and Hannah (Butler) Andrews. He 
was born Ipswich, Sept. 25, 1729 and died 
Apr. 16, 1S06. She died, Ipswich, Feb. 22, 
1809, ae 78 years. [Essex Antiquarian Vol. 
Ill, P. ico.]' 

Jonathan Burnam 5 son of John and 
Sarah Burnam, was a cordwainer and yeo- 
man living in Chebacco parish. He received 
£20: from each of his brothers John and 
Thomas, March 29, 1725, the amount due 
him from his father's estate. He married 
[int. November 22, 17 18,] Rose Annable, 
daughter of Robert and Susannah Annable. 
His will dated May 3, 1753 was proved Dec. 
6, 1779. He left his real estate to his son 
Robert. He mentioned in this document his 
son Robert, his daughter Man- Andrews, 
and other daughters Abigail, Lucy, and Rose, 
also a grandchild named Mary Burnam. 
His widow Rose died November 5, 17S0, ae 
83 years. 
Children: 

S3 — Robert 5 . See below. 

84— Mary 3 , married October 28, 1741, Thom- 
as Andrews, son of Thomas and Mary 
(Smith) Andrews. [Essex Antiquarian 
Vol. HI p. 100.] 
S5 — Abigail 5 , bap. Sept. 18, 1726. 
S6 — Aaron 5 , bap. May 9, 1731. 
87 — Moses 5 , bap. June 13, 1736. 
88 — Lucy 5 , bap. July 23, 173S. 
89 — Rose 5 , bap. Dec .21, 1750, married Aaron 
Kinsman, Dec. 5, 1765^ He was son of 
Stephen and Elizabeth (Russell) Kinsman. 
He was bap. Aug. 21, 1743. He m. 2d, 
Mary Hall, Dec. 26, 1775. He removed to 
Concord, X. H., became Captain in Col. 
Stark's Regiment and was later called Colonel, 
of Hanover, N. H. . He d. 1810. 



FAMILY GENEALOGIES 



121 



32 

Robert Burnam, son of John and Sarah 
Burnam, was a cooper by trade. He re- 
ceived £20 from each of his brothers Johr> 
and Thomas, March 29, 1725. He married 
January 26, 1724-5 Joanna Low. 

Children: 

90 — Jo axx.v, bap. May 14, 1727. 

91 — Martha 5 , bap. Nov. 9, 1729. 

92 — Philemon* 5 , bap. Feb. 17, 1733-4. 

93— Eunice 5 , bap. Aug. 17, 1735. 

94 — James 5 , bap. Jan. 22, 1737. 



36 

Josiah Burnam 4 son of Josiah and 
Abigail (Yarney) Burnam was born about 
16S9. He was a cooper by trade. He mar- 
ried int. Ipswich, Dec. 5, .1713, Elizabeth 
Butler, daughter of Lieut. William Butler of 
Ipswich. She died before June, 1741 and he 
married June 25, 1741 widow Abigail Day 
of Gloucester. He died Jan. 27, 1777 ae. 
"near 88 years." In his will dated July 31, 
1761 proved Feb. 3, 1777, he mentioned his 
wife Abigail, sons Josiah, William, Abraham, 
and daughters Elizabeth Burnham, Abigail 
Marshall, Sarah Cogswell, Thankful and 
Ruth Burnam also grandchildren John, 
Mary, Lucretia, and Francis. The inven- 
tory dated Feb. 6, 1777, showed personal 
property amounting to £43:09:06 and real 
estate £243:13:04. 

Children, by his first wife, Elizabeth: 
95 — Mary 5 , b. Oct. 16, 17 14, m. first, Ipswich, 
May 10, 1733, John Burnam [70] third, son 
of John [29] and Anne (Choate) Burnam. 
He died about 173S, and she m., second, 
May 10, 1744, Francis Burnam [78] son of 
Thomas and Hannah (Cogswell) Burnam. 
96 — Abigail 5 , b. Nov. 18, 1716, d. young. 
97— Josiah 5 , b. Jan. 11. 17 18. See below. 
98 — Job 5 , b. June 18, 1720. d. young. 
99 — Elizabeth 5 , b. July 2, 1723. She was a 

spinster in 1761. 
100— Abigail 5 , b. Xov. 26, [bap. 27] 1726. She 

m. Marshall. 

J oi — Sarah 5 , b. Aug. 17, [bap. Aug. 24] 1729. 
She m. Cogswell. 



102 — Job 5 , b. May 22, (bap. May 27) 1733- 

Probably died young. 
103 — William 5 , b. Apr. 22, (bap. Apr. 23) 1738. 

See below. 

Children by his second wife Abigail : 

104 — Abraham 5 , bap. May 30, 1742. See below. 

105 — Thankful 5 , bap. Sept. 15, 1745, m. Dec. 

6, 1770, David Story? 
106 — Ruth 5 , bap. Xov. 20, 1748, m. Dec. 3, 

1772, Daniel Story? 



37 

Jacob Burnam 4 was the son of Josiah and 
Abigail (Yarney) Burnam. He was born 
June 7, 1690?-' and m. int. Ipswich, Xov. 20, 
17 14, Man* Low. He was called ''Cord- 
wainer, residence Gloucester" in 1720, in a 
deed recorded in Essex deeds, Vol. 41, P. 22. 

Child: 

107 — Jacob 5 , b. Gloucester, July 13, 17 19. 
[Gloucester Records.] 



38 

Ebenezer Burnam 4 son of Josiah and 
Abigail (Yarney) Burnam, was b. Dec. 23, 
169 1 ? He was a weaver as shown by a deed 
in Essex deeds 66-140. He married, int. 
Nov. 29, 17 18, at Ipswich, Dorothy Andrews, 
daughter of Joseph and Sarah (Ring) An- 
drews. She was born Nov. 23, 1697. He 
removed from Ipswich, Massachusetts, to 
Hampton, Windham County, Connecticut, 
where he purchased Feb. 6, 1733-4, a ^ arm of 
one hundred acres. He and his wife joined 
the church there "in full communion,'-' Oct. 
20, 1734. He was the ancestor of numerous 
progeny in Connecticut. He died there 
March 10, 1746 ae 54 years. His wife, 
Dorothy died June 26, 1760 ae 63 years. 

Children: 

10S — Joshua 5 , b. 1720. 

109 — Ebenezer 5 , b. 1722. 

no — Joseph 5 , b. 1723. 

in — Andrew 5 , bap. May 28, 1727. 

112 — Isaac 5 , bap. Dec. 28, 1729. 

113 — Dorothy 5 , bap. Jan. 23, 173 1-2. 



,^., 



122 



THE MASSACHUSETTS MAGAZINE 



40 

Moses Burnam 4 , son of Thomas and 
Lydia (Pengry) Burnam was born Jan. 24, 
1668. He was a laborer. He married about 

1698-9, Anne . Moses and wife Anne 

and others were called "heirs of John An- 
drews who married a daughter of Mr. Jere- 
miah Belcher late of Ipswich" in a deed dated 
July I, 1721. [Essex deeds 40-9.] He was 
probably the Moses Burnam who died March 
3, 1746, at Ipswich. She was probably 
the widow Ann Bumham who died 
in Linebrook parish, May 19, 1759, aged 
94 years. [Felt's History of Ipswich, p. 
191]. 

Children: 

114 — David 5 , b. Dec. 10, 1699. See below. 

115 — Mary 5 , b. June 15, 1701. 

116 — Moses 5 , b. March 9, 1905. 

117 — Anne 5 , b. 2:10 m: 1709. 



4i 

Nathaniel BuRNAii'sonof Lieut. Thomas 
and Lydia (Pengry) Burnam was born 
about 1 67 1. He was a husbandman and 
resided in Ipswich as late as 1729, when he 
and his brothers Eleazer of Ipswich and 
Moses and James of Norwich, Connecticut, 
appointed John Pengry of Ipswich their 
attorney in their suit for their rights in a be- 
quest of their great grandfather Robert 
Clemens, formerly of Haverhill, made to 
"their honored mother, Lydia Burnam, late 
of Ipswich." He purchased a farm of 
Richard Peabody in Boxford in 1731-2, 
and resided there during the rest of his life. 
[Essex deeds 61-56]. He married Eunice 
Kinsman daughter of Quartermaster Robert 
and Mary (Boreman) Kinsman. She was born 
in Ipswich, January 24, 1670. He died in Box- 
ford, April 16, 1746 in his seventy-fifth year. 
In the settlement of his estate [Essex Probate 
Records 331-60] mention is made of his sons 
Nathan and Nathaniel, his daughter, Sarah 
Nathaniel Cross, and wife [Phebe], and John 



Day and wife [Eunice], "Coole" Smith and 
wife [Sarah] referred to him as "our father"' 
in conveying property to Nathan Burnam, 
May 15, 1746. His widow Eunice died 1750. 
Her will dated May 16, 1749 was proved 
April 2, 1750. In the settlement of her estate 
the names of the children appear as above 
except Sarah who was then the wife of 
Solomon Wood. 
Children: 

11S — Nathaniel 5 , (He may have been the 
"Nathan" who was born Ipswich, Sept. 19, 
19, ijco.) See below. 

119 — Nathan 5 , b. Sept. 19, 1701. See below. 

120 — Eunice 5 , "Unice" born Feb. 12, 1703. 
She married May 5, 1722, John Day . They 
lived in Ipswich and the records contain the 
dates of death of three sons named John 
between 1723 and 1730. 

121 — Phoebe 5 , "Phoebee" b. Feb. 3, 1705. She 
married (int. May 1, 1725) John Adams, son 
of John and Hannah (Treadwell) Adams of 
Ipswich. He was born about 1700 and died 
Nov. 2S, 1729. She married second (int. 
May 12, 1732), Nathaniel Cross of Ipswich. 
Essex Antiquarian, Vol. II, P. 99.) 

122 — Sarah 5 , bap. 30:1m.: 1712. She married (int. 
Dec. 20, 1729) Cooley Smith, son of Thomas 
and Elizabeth Smith. He was born Apr. 9, 
1709. She married, second, Solomon Wood. 



43 

Aaron Burnam 4 , son of Thomas and 
Lydia (Pengry) Burnam, was born Feb. 12, 
1676. He married, Ipswich, Nov. 4, 1701, 
Hester Bishop, daughter of Samuel and 
Hester (Cogswell) Bishop. She was born 
Aug. 21, 1 68 1. Her mother married for her 
second husband Lieut. Thomas Burnam [10] 
father of Aaron. Aaron moved about 17 18 
to Norwich, Connecticut. His- cattle brand 
was enrolled there in 1720, and in a deed, 
dated Oct. 3, 1720, he was called "lately of 
Ipswich now of Norwich, Connecticut." He 
died there August, 1728. 

Child: 

123 — Aaron 5 , b. Ipswich, Apr. 24, 1720. d. May 
2, 1720. 



FAMILY GENEALOGIES 



123 



44 

ELEAZER Burnam 4 , son of Lieut. Thomas 
and Lydia (Pengry) Burnam, was born 
Ipswich, Sept. 5, 1678. He removed to Nor- 
wich, Connecticut, where he was recognized 
as an inhabitant in 1703. Further record of 
him may be found in the Burnham Gene- 
alogy, p- 3 I 3- 



48 

James Burnam 4 , son of Lieut. Thomas 
and Lydia (Pengry) Burnam was born about 
16S7 and early removed to Norwich, Con- 
necticut, where he was a clothier in 1729, 
when he with his brothers gave power of 
attorney to John Pengry of Ipswich. [See 41] 



50 

Lieut. Thomas Burnam 4 son of Lieut. 
Thomas and Hester (b. Cogswell) Burnam 
was born Ipswich, Feb. 12, 1694-5. He 
was a carpenter by occupation. He married 
int. Ipswich, 13:10m.: 17 18, Priscilla Apple- 
ton, daughter of Major Isaac and Priscilla 
(Baker) Appleton. She was born March 16, 
1697. He died April 4, 1730 ae 35 yrs. 2 
mos. In the settlement of his estate, his 
widow was executrix and mention is made 
of his sons Thomas and Isaac and daughters 
Priscilla and Esther. The inventory dated 
June 11, 1730 equalled £23":oo:oo. [Essex 
Probate Files 4175.] His widow, married 
second, May 23, 1734 Arthur Abbott, son of 
Arthur and Elizabeth (White) Abbott. She 
died his widow in June, 1774 (Essex Anti- 
quarian, vol. I, P. 141 and Vol. IV, P. 3.) 

Children: 

i24~P R ftciLLA 5 , bap. March 10, 1719, d. March 
24, 1719. 

I2 5 — Thomas 5 , bap. Feb. 25, 1721-2. See below. 

1 26— Priscilla 5 , bap. Mar. 8, 1723. 

1 27— Isaac 5 , bap. Apr. 24, 1726. See below. 

12$— Esther 5 , bap. July 21, 1728, d. Feb. 24, 
x 735 ae 7 yrs. 7 mos. 



51 

Benjamin Burnam 4 , son of Lieut. Thomas 
and Hester (Cogswell) Burnam, was born 
December 21, 1696. [The author of the 
"Burnham Genealogy" states that he mar- 
ried April 20, 1727, Mary Kinsman and that 
he died October 15, 1737. No further record 
of him is given in the above mentioned work 
and the editor fails to find any record of the 
above marriage or death. The author of 
the genealogy may have had access to private 
records at present unknown.] He probably 
settled at Norwich, Connecticut, with his 
brothers James and Eleazer. 



John Burnam 4 , son of John and Elizabeth 
(Wells) Burnam, was born April 8, 167 1. 
He was a fisherman by occupation. He 
married at Chebacco, April 18 [April 13 in 
duplicate], 1693, Sarah Choate, daughter of 
John and Anne Choate. He died before 
October, 17 16. His widow Sarah married 
Isaac Webster of "Kingstown" Xew Hamp- 
shire. He was son of Thomas and Sarah 
(Brewer) Webster of Hampton, X. H., b. 
Apr. 2. 1670, d. Feb. 21, 17 18. [Webster 
Mss. Gen.,X. E. H.'G.'S. Library.] October 16. 
1 7 16, Isaac Webster of Kingston. Xew Hamp- 
shire, conveyed to their "son Thomas Burnum 
of Chebacco, weaver, the estate of his grand- 
father John Burnum Sen. late of Chebacco," 
said Thomas agreeing to pay nine pounds to 
his brothers and sisters John, Daniel, Ben- 
jamin, Joseph, Elizabeth, and Sarah (thirty 
shillings apiece.) 

Children: 

129 — John 5 . See below. 

130 — Thomas 5 , See below. 

131 — Daniel 5 , b. about 1700. See below. 

132 — Benjamin 5 , b. about 1703. See below. 

133 — Joseph 5 . See below. 

134 — Elizabeth 5 . She married at Ipswich, 
February 6, 1732-3, Samuel Webster of 
Kingston, New Hampshire. He was s. of 
Thomas and Sarah Webster of Hampton, 



124 



THE MASSACHUSETTS MAGAZINE 



N. H. She d. Oct. 30, 1738, and he m. 2d, 
May 10, 1740, Dorothy Staniel. The Web- 
ster Manuscript Genealogy in the N. E. Hist. 
Gen. Soc. Library, erroneously states that 
she was the daughter of David & Elizabeth 
Burnam [See 59.] We know, surely, that 
the last named Elizabeth married Joseph 
Poland. [See will of David No. 59. Essex 
Prob. Rec. 346-142] See also Xo. 159. 



137 — Jeremiah 5 . See below. 

138 — Caleb 5 . See below. 

139 — Stephen 5 . See below. 

140 — Hannah 5 , married July 4, 1739, Isaac 
Parsons of Gloucester. He died about 1767. 
as his widow Hannah petitioned ( U tober 27, 
1767 that her son, Ebenezer Parsons, be ap- 
pointed administrator. 

141 — Nathan 6 . See below. 



54 

Lieut.. Thomas Burnam 4 , son of John 
and Elizabeth (Wells) Burnam, was born in 
Ipswich, September 22, 1673. He was a 
husbandman or yeoman. He received from 
his father in 1699- 1700, extensive grants of 
land at the head of Whitredge Creek includ- 
ing the house, barn and half an orchard, be- 
sides other real estate. He was called 
Sergeant in 1723, in a deed from his brother 
Jacob. [Essex Deeds 43-229]. He married 

Susanna . They conveyed to their son 

Nathan, January 15, 1748, the "homestead 
land lying southeasterly from the Head of 
the Creek called Whittredge's Creek" con- 
taining about twelve acres "joyning upon my 
son Thomas Burnam,'' together with one 
quarter part of a saw mill, etc., etc. [Essex 
Deeds, 92-32.] Between 1731 and 1733 he 
conveyed property to his sons Caleb, Thomas, 
and Jeremiah. [Essex Deeds 84-106.] He 
died about January, 1748. His son Thomas 
Burnam, Jr., was appointed administrator 
January 23, 1748. The inventory dated 
March 10, 1748 showed an estate valued at 
£1039:03:00. His real estate was divided 
among his five sons July i, 1749, [Essex 
Probate Files No. 4178.] his eldest son 
Thomas receiving a double share. His 
widow Susannah died about 1752. The in- 
ventory of her estate was dated May n, 1752. 
Her son Caleb was executor, and her sons 
Thomas, Jeremiah, Stephen, and Nathan 
were named, also her daughter Hannah 
Parsons. 

Children: 

136 — Thomas 3 . See below. 



57 

Jacob Burnam 1 son of Thomas and Eliza- 
beth (Wells) Burnam was born about 16S1 
or 2. He was called in deeds, a cordwainer, 
carpenter, and yeoman. Previous to Jan- 
uary 25, 1710-11 his mother Widow Eliza- 
beth, had conveyed to him "half an acre of 
ground with part of an orchard" on the south- 
east side of Chebacco River. [Essex Deeds 
25-12]. He married at Chebacco, November 
20, 1704, Mehitable Perkins, daughter of 
Jacob and Sarah (Wainwright) Perkins. She 
was born July 12, 1681 and died Sept. 6, 
1769. He died about March 26, 1773 ae 91 
years. His will dated February 26, 1741 
was probated March 31, 1773. He men- 
tioned his wife, Mehitable, sons Jacob, 
Solomon, and John; and daughter Mehitable 
Foster. The inventory dated April 27, 1773 
showed an estate valued £478:12:01. [Essex 
Probate Rec. 348, p. 88, 90, and 130.] 

Children: 

142 — Westley 5 , bap. Apr. 26, 1706, d. March 28, 
1707. 

143 — Jacob 5 , b. 1708. See below. 

144 — Solomon 5 , b. 1709. See below. 

145 — John 5 , See below. 

146 — Mehitable 5 , m. Dec. 27, 1732 John Foster 
Jr., son of Sergt. John and Mary Foster. A 
committee was appointed June 1, 1767 to set 
off one third of his estate to his widow Me- 
hitable. They reported Xov. 27, 1767. 
[Essex Prob. Rec. 344, P. 271-2.] 

58 

Captain Jonathan Burnam 1 , son of John 
and Elizabeth (Wells) Burnam was born 
about 1686. He was called a yeoman and 
later gentleman. Widow Elizabeth Burnam, 



FAMILY GENEALOGIES 



125 



his mother, conveyed various lots of land at 
Chebacco to Jonathan and his brother David 
January 25, 17 10- 11 including 24 acres of 
upland with "dwelling-house, barn, sheep- 
house, orchard, fences, and common rights," 
southeast of the river; with salt marsh and 
four-fifths of the corn mill in Chebacco; also 
500 acres of land at "Cocks Hall" which her 
husband John bought of "Mr. Harlackindine 
Simonds." She reserved certain rights in 
the dwelling house. [Essex Deeds 25-12.] 
He conveyed 12 acres of land with dwelling 
house and barn thereon and 30 acres in lots 
in the Chebacco woods to his brother David 
Oct. 2, 1722. [Essex Deeds 42-129.] He 
conveyed to his brother Thomas a lot of salt 
marsh on the "south side of Chebacco River 
near the farm formerly Crosses," Feb. 9, 
1722-3. [Essex Deeds 43-128.] He married, 
first, int. March 17, 17 10, Mary Perkins, 
daughter of Jacob and Sarah (Wainwright) 
Perkins. She was born Aug. 2. 1685, and 
died about 1728. He married, second, int. 
May 13, 1730, Martha Foster, daughter of 
Sergt. John and Man- Foster. He died Apr. 
3, 1773 in his eighty-seventh year. His will, 
dated June 23, 1767 was probated Apr. 27, 
1773. [Essex Prob. Files 4129.] He men- 
tioned his wife Martha, sons Jonathan and 
Francis, daughters, Mary Smith, Eunice 
Martin, Abigail Dodge, Martha- Burnam, 
and grandson Enoch Haskell. He was called 
Capt. in the inventor}- dated Apr. 29, 1773. 
His estate amounting to £109:01:01 personal 
and £646:00:00 real estate. The real estate 
included 45 acres of homestead land and 
two-fifths for the corn ( mill. His widow, 
Martha, died Aug. 20, 1790, in her ninetieth 
year. 

Children by first wife, Mary: 

M7 — Jonathan 5 , b. 17 16. See below. 

148— Mary 5 , b. Dec, 17 18, m. Oct. 22, 1741, 
Job Smith. In his will dated June 13, 1782, 
probated Xov. 6, 1787 he gave to his wife 
Mary all his household goods and his interest 
in a pew in the new meeting house. [Essex 
Prob. Files 25,586.] 



149 — Francis 5 , b. 17 21. See below. 

150 — Eunice 5 , bap. Apr. 24, 1726. m. Ipswich, 

Oct. 22, 1745 George Martin. 
151 — Lucy 5 , bap. Sept. 17, 1727, d. before 1734. 

Children by second wife, Martha: 

152 — Martha 5 , bap. July 4, 1731, d. in infancy. 

153 — Martha 5 , bap. March 11, 1732-3. 

154 — Lucy 5 , bap. Dec. 29, 1734. She m. Feb. 3, 
1757, Enoch Haskell of Gloucester. He was 
S. of Ebenezer and Elizabeth Haskell, b. 
Gloucester, July 1, 1730. She d. Sept. 175 — 

155 — Joseph 5 , bap. May 21, 1738, d. (The Ip- 
swich Records also give Joseph, son of Lieut. 
Jonathan, d. Dec. 6, 1736. There may have 
been two Josephs born to this couple or an 
error may have been made in copying the 
dates in the printed vital records.) 

156 — Elizabeth 5 , bap. Mar. 15, 1741. d. in 
infancy. 

157 — Elizabeth 5 , bap. Aug. 21, 1743. d. bef. 
1767. 

158 — Abigail 5 , bap. June 2, 1745. m. Mar. 12, 
1767, Deacon Grover Dodge, son of Lieut. 
Nehemiah and Elizabeth (Grover) Dodge. 
He was b. 1745 and d. Dec. 10, 1S31. In 
his will dated Oct. 20, 1S04, on file March 6, 
1832, he mentioned his wife, Abigail. She 
died March 29, 1836. [The Dodge Familv, 
P. 79l 



59 

David Burnam 4 , son of John and Eliza- 
beth (Wells) Burnam, was born about 1690. 
He was a yeoman. His mother, widow 
Elizabeth Burnam, granted several lots of 
land to David and his brother Jonathan, 
January 25, 1710-11. These we have de- 
scribed under Jonathan Burnam [$S]. He 
sold land adjoining his own to John Goodhue, 
March 11, 1724 [Essex Deeds, 44-S0.] June 
21, 1740 he conveyed to his son Wesley Bur- 
nam, 20 acres, being a part of his own home- 
stead. [Essex Deeds, 97-7.] He married, 
first, [int. 28:2: 171 1] in Ipswich, Elizabeth 
Perkins, daughter of Jacob and Elizabeth 
(Sparks) Perkins. She died between 1723 
and 1740. He married, second, August 20, 
1740, Widow Elizabeth Bartlet. The re- 
cords state that he lived to about eighty years 
of age and was buried February 2, 1770. In 



126 



THE MASSACHUSETTS MAGAZINE 



his will dated February 6, 1768, probated 
February 27, 1770, he mentioned his wife 
Elizabeth, sons David, Westly, Isaac, Joseph, 
and William, daughters Elizabeth "Poolen," 
Sarah Giddings, and Abigail Dane. The 
inventor}' dated March 23, 1770, showed a 
valuation of £242:08:09. [Essex Probate 
Records, 346-142 and 396.] In this inven- 
tory among other parcels of real estate, men- 
tion is made of half a dwelling-house, half a 
barn and f of a corn mill. His widow 
Elizabeth, died October 16, 1794, "in her 92d 
year." 

Children by Elizabeth (Perkins). 
159 — Elizabeth 5 , b. June 3, 1712; m. Jan. 17, 
i 73 2_ 3j Joseph Poland. In the Perkins 
. Family Descendants of Sergeant Jacob and 
in the Webster Mss. genealogy and 
Burnhara genealogy the statement is made 
that she married Samuel Webster. This is 
an error. She married Joseph Poland the 
month before another Elizabeth Burnam 
married Samuel Webster, and was Elizabeth 
"Poolen" in 1768 when her father's will was 
written [The Elizabeth who married Samuel 
Webster was [Xo. 134] daughter of John and 
Sarah (Choate) Burnam. Her mother 
widow Sarah married, for her second hus- 
band, Isaac Webster of "Kingstown", New 
. Hampshire, and the "Samuel" Webster above 
named was called "of Kingston."] A 
Joseph Poland d. Manchester, abt. 1798. 
160 — David 5 , b. June 17, 17 14. See below. 
161 — Sarah 5 , b. Dec. 28, 1715; m. Dec. 9, 1736, 
Solomon "Giddings" Jr , son of Lieut. 
Solomon and Margery (Goodhue) Giddings. 
She died the "widow of Deacon Solomon," 
May 18, 1810, "aged 94 years." 
162 — Abigail 5 , b. Aug. 31, 17 17; m. Feb. 12, 
1730-40, Daniel Dane. Their son Nathan 
b. Dec. 27, 1752, H. C. 1778, was the cele- 
brated jurist who founded the Dane profes- 
sorship of law in Harvard University. 
163 — Westley 5 , b. Oct., 1 7 19. See below. 
164 — Benjamin 5 , b. probably Dec. 7, 1723. In 
the original family record reprinted verbatim 
in the "Burnham Genealogy" the above date 
is given as the birthday of a son whose full 
name was omitted. In the Essex Vital 
Records is recorded the death of Benjamin 
Bnrnham, son of David and Betsey Burn- 
ham, April 12, 1817, aged 91 y. 8 mo. While 
the age does not exactly correspond with 
the date of birth of the unnamed son, yet as 



David apparently gives a full list of the 
children born to him, it is probable that Ben- 
jamin was the son born on that date. Set- 
below. 

Children by Elizabeth his second wife: 
165 — Isaac 5 , b. Aug. 31, 1741 (bap. Sept. 6). 

See below. 
166 — Joseph 5 , b. Jan. 8, 1743-4 (bap. Jan. 8). 

See below. 
167 — William 5 , b. Aug. 10, 1746 (bap. Aug. 17). 

See below. 



64 

Lieut. Thomas Burnam 4 son of James 
and Mary Burnam, was born June 27, 1681. 
He was a carpenter. He had the Narra- 
gansett grant of his father at Xo. 1 Buxton. 
He received from his father September 2, 
1703, a part of the homestead property with 
house, etc., upon it, also other lots of land 
described in the article upon James [13]. 
In 1 7 19 he received further property from his 
father. He married September 30, 1703, 
Margaret Boardman, daughter of Thomas 
and Elizabeth (Perkins) Boardman. She 
was born April 5, 1681 and died March 10, 
1759, aged 78 years. He died May 10, 1759 
in his 78th year. His will dated April 3, 
1759, was probated May 28, of the same year. 
He mentioned his sons Thomas, Joshua, and 
Offen, and daughters Margaret Griffin wife of 
Samuel, and Mary Peabody. He also men- 
tioned a son John deceased. He gave to 
"Offen," land and housings in Sutton. The 
inventory dated June 12, 1759, amounted to 
£259:05:04. [Essex Probate Files Xo. 

4I79-] 

Children: 

168 — Thomas 5 , b. August 14, 1704. See below 

169 — Margaret 5 , m. Samuel Griffin of Glou- 
cester, October 28, 1729. [See Essex Prob. 
Rec. b. 363, p. 123.] 

170 — Joshua 5 , b. 29: 7m. 1710. See below. 

171 — Ophin 5 , bap. 10: 6 m. 171 2. See below. 

172 — Elizabeth 5 , bap. Mar. 13, 1715; d. at 
Gloucester, Feb. 23, 1730. 

173 — Mary 5 , bap. July 13, 17 18; m. ■ 

Peabody. 

174 — John 5 , bap. June 3, 1722. See below. 



FAMILY GENEALOGIES 



127 



68 

Lieut. James Burnam 4 , son of James and 
Mary Burnam was born January 30, 1691. 
He was a yeoman and was called cornet in 
1734 and lieutenant in 1736. His father 
conveyed to him January- 25, 17 19, the 
dwelling house which he (James Sen.) then 
lived in, which James Junior was "to have 
and enjoy immediately after my and my 
wife's decease." In 1723 he sold to his 
brother Thomes Burnam, ten acres on 
"Great Creek" near Burnums Island," and 
February 28, 1726, sold him thirteen acres 
near the Saltonstall farm. In 1731 he sold 
to his brother-in-law Charles Tuttle, black- 
smith, land in Ipswich bounded upon land 
which he had previously sold to his brother 
Thomas Burnam. He had previously (in 
1726) sold to said Tuttle woodland in "Ham- 
blet Parish, near Black Brook." He mar- 
ried first, (int.) 27 :12m: 1713, Sarah Rogers,* 
daughter of Mr. John Rogers as shown by a 
deed in Essex Registry [37-162]. The state- 
ment is made in the New England Historic 
Genealogical Society, v. 5, p. 316, that she 
was the daughter of Samuel and Sarah 
(Wade) Rogers. She with her mother 
Martha, then wife of Jacob Boardman, and 
sister Martha, wife of Matthew Perkins, Jr., 
conveyed land in Ipswich, Feb. 11, 171 6- 17. 
She died July 17, 1727, aged 38. He married 
second, October 3, 1728, widow Hannah 
Cogswell, widow of William. As "Hannah 
Wiggens of Stratham" she married William 
Cogswell Jr., [int.] February 24, 172 1-2. 
William Cogswell, Jr., died Aug. 6, 1727, in 
his 30th year. Lieut. James Burnam died 
March 12, 1736 in his 46th year. His widow 
Hannah was appointed administratrix of his 
estate April 26, 1737. [Essex Prob. Rec. 
3 1 8- 1 60.] The inventory dated May 5, 

*The editor of the "Burnham Genealogy" 
»<>r some unaccountable reason gives James 
*"ho married Sarah Rogers December 27, 
I 7 I 3i as son of Samuel and grandson of the 
first Robert. 



1737, showed an estate valued at £5083:18:00 
[Essex Prob. Rec. 322-379.] She was ap- 
pointed guardian of her three minor children 
November 22, 1737. She married for her 
third husband Jan. 9, 1738, Andrew Bur- 
leigh, Jr., and died his wife September 15, 
1759. The personal estate of James Burnam 
was divided in 1738 as follows: To widow- 
Hannah one third, and one quarter of the 
remaining to his four daughters; Abigail 
Burnam, Sarah Alias Staniford, Man- Bur- 
nam and Hannah alias "Kindsman." [Essex 
Probate Record, v. 322, pp. 384-391. 
Children by his first wife Sarah: 
175 — Sarah 5 , bap. Aug. 28, 17 15; m. Thomas 
Staniford Jr., Dec. 2S, 1732. She died the 
wife of Captain Thomas Staniford, Sept. 18, 
1778, aged 63. 
176 — Hannah 5 , bap. 7:2111:1717; m. Jan. 31, 
1733, John Kinsman, 2, of Lieut. Joseph and 
Susanna (Dutch) Kinsman. He was born 
Nov. 21, 1709. She died May 31, 175.5, a^ed 
36 y. He m. second, int. Dec. 9, 1753, Eliza- 
beth (Fellows) Perkins, widow of Joseph 
Perkins of Ipswich. 
177 — James 5 , bap. 14:121^1719; d. Mar. 12, 
172Q aged 10 vears.- [Gravestone, Old 
Burial Hill.] 
178 — Martha 5 , bap. Aug. 12, 1722; d. Jan. 12, 
1738. in her 16 th year. [Gravestone, 
Old Burial Hill]. 
179 — Mary 5 , bap. Aug. 7, 1726; m. first, Jan. 15, 
1742, Daniel Staniford. He died July 15, 
1757, aged 40 y. [Essex deeds, 93-148.] She 
married second, May 4, 1758, Rev. Nathaniel 
Rogers, [Records of South Church, Ipswich, 
and Essex deeds, 115-160]. He died May S, 
1775 aged 74 years and she died his widow, 
Sept. 18, 1779. [In the New England Hist. 
Gen. Register V. 5, p. 323, Mary is erroneous- 
ly stated to have been the daughter of Thomas 
and Margaret ("Boarman"), Burnam. She 
was evidently confounded with Mary No. 
173-1 
Children by his second wife Hannah: 
180 — Abigail 5 , bap. Aug. 17, 1729; d. 7:7 b.: 

1729. 
181 — James 5 , bap. Nov. 8, 1730; d. Jan. 2, 1738, 
"in the 8th vear of his age." [Grave stone, 
Old Burying' Hill, Ipswich.] 
182 — Abigail 5 , bap. Sept. 11, 1732. 
183 — Andrew 5 , bap. Dec. 15, 1734; d. Jan. 8, 
1738 in his 4th year. [Grave stone, Old 
Burying Hill.] 

(To be continued.) 



{This is the ninth instalment of a series of articles on Massachusetts Pioneers to other states, to be 
published by The Massachusetts Magazine.] 

MASSACHUSETTS PIONEERS. 
MICHIGAN SERIES. 



By Charles A. Flagg 



Besides the abbreviations of book titles, (explained on pages 76. 77. 78 and 79 of April, and page 180 of 
July, 1908 issues) the following are used: b. for born; d. for died; in. for married; set. for settled in. 



Prink, James of Will iamst own; set. 

Mich., 1838? Shiawassee. 397. 
Frost, Allen L., b. Williamsburg, 1S04; 

set. N. Y., Mich., 1835. Macomb Hist., 

698. 
Bezaleel, set. N. Y., 1815? Macomb 

Hist., 698. 
Frederick, set. 



Vt., 1S00? Jackson 

Port., 581. 
Josiah, b. Williamsburg, 1763; set. 

N. Y., 1803. Detroit, 1217; Jackson 

Port., 856. 
Josiah, b. Williamsburg, 1791, sat- 

N. Y., 1803. Detroit, 1217. 

Mary, b. Springfield: m. 1S10? Tim- 
othy Rockwell of Canada. Washtenaw 
Hist., 792. 

Samuel, b. 1786; set.Vt., 1810? N. Y., 

1824; Mich., 1841. Oakland Port., 346; 

Macomb Hist., 822. 
Frothingham, George E., b. Boston, 1S36; 

set. Mich. Washtenaw Hist., 996. 
Fry, Jeduthan, b. 1815; set. Pa., Mich., 

1834. Ingham Hist., 292. 
Frye, Hiram of Andover:set. Mich., 1S38. 

Ingham Hist., 119; Lansing, 48. 
Fuller, Bethanv, m. 1800? Levi Wood 

of N. Y. Hillsdale Port . 404. 

Betsey, b. 1802, m. I. W. Munger of 

N. Y. Genesee Port., 1014. 

Electa, d. 1S83; m. James Morrill of 

O. and Mich., (1812 soldier;. Branch 
Port., 535. 

Elizabeth, m. James Phelps of 

Mass. and X. Y. Clinton Port., 984. 

James, b. Ipswich, 1770; set. X. H. f 

N. Y., 1815. Ingham Hist, opposite 
-308. 



— Jason, set. X. Y. t 1816. Genesee 
Port., 1015. 

— John, b. 1788: set. X.Y., Mich., 1837, 
Jackson Hist., 795. 

— Joshua, b. Rehoboth, 1701: set. Conn. 
1722. Grand Rapids City, 177., 

Lucy, b. 1789; m. 180S Peter Sears 



of Mass and Mich. Washtenaw Hist., 
665; Washtenaw Port., 340. 

Mary, b. Warwick, 17S6; m. Pearl 

Cannon'of X. H., Vt , X. Y., and Mich. 
Macomb. Hist., 724-5. 

Philo C, b. Berkshire Co.; set. X. Y., 

1815? Grand Rapids City, 17S: Kent, 

1009. 
Sophia, b. 1S01: m. 1S25 ? Philip Wells 

of Mich. Oakland Port., 639. 
Gaines. Emeline E., b. Levden, 181S; m. 

Charles A. Shattuck of X. Y. Hillsdale Port., 

023- 
Gale, Brooks, set. Vt. 17SS? Detroit, 11S9. 

Elbridge G., set. Mich., 1S44. Genesee 

Hist., 57. 
Gallagher, Louise, of Charlestown; m. 1865? 

Wm. G. Burchfield of Colorado. Washtenaw 

Past, 177. 
Gallup, , b. 1800, set. X". Y., Mich., iS44- 

Jackson Hist., n 04. 

ANYARD, STATA, m. 

Muskegon Port, 347. 
Gardner, Daniel, b. Brimfield; set. X". V. 
1S12? d. 1824. Allegan Hist., 362; Allegan 
Twent., 284; Kalamazoo Port., 701. 

Lebeus, b. Hingham, 1S29; set. Mich.i 

1850. Jackson Hist., 796. 

Lydia, of Xantucket; m. 1796 Stephen 

Walker of R. I. and X". Y. Detroit, T12SA; 
Grand Rapids Lowell, 3S2; Wavne Chron., 
16*. 



MICHIGAN PIONEERS 



129 



W. A. H., b. Hancock, 1819; set. N. Y. 

1825, Mich. 1S55. Kent, 1261. 

Garland, Horace W., b Boston, 1S55; set. la. 

1855, Mich. 1S63, Tex., Kan., Mich., 1894. 

Berrien Twent., 706. 
Garlic, Lucy, b. Lanesboro; m. 1814 Benjamin 

Colegrove of Penn. and Mich. Lenawee 

Port., 204. 
Garlick, Horace, b. Boston, 1809; set. Conn., 

N. Y., 181S, Mich. Macomb Hist., 699. 

Samuel, b. Boston; set. Conn., N. Y., 

1S1S, Mich. d. 1S30. Jackson Port., 317; 
Macomb Hist., 699. 

Garvey, Sarah E., set. Mich., 1848. Cass 

Twent., 360. 
Gaston, Elijah, set. N. Y. and Mich. d. 1841. 

Ingham Port., 687. 
Gates, Aaron of Conway, set. N. Y., 1810? 

Jackson Port., 461. 
Cynthia, m. 1795? Samuel P. Noyes of 

N. Y., Branch Port., 496. 

Elizabeth, m. 1800? Issac Amaden of 

N. Y. Washtenaw Past., 1S2. 

Increase S., b. Conway, 1800?; set. N. 

Y., Mich., 1839. Jackson Port., 461. 

Persis of Worcester; m. 1740? Adonijah 

Rice of Mass. and Vt. Jackson Port., 726. 

Sarah, m. 1790? Nicholas Chamberlain, of 

N. Y. Kalamazoo Port., 381. 
Gay, Abner, b. Dedham; set. N. H. Muskegon 

Port., 153. 
Edward A., b. Boston, 1829; set. N. Y- 

Mich., 1833. Lansing, 506; Washtenaw Hist., 

779- 

Timothy, b. Boston, 1S01; set. Mich., 

1833. Lansing, 506. 

■ William, set. Penn. 1825? Canada and 

O. Clinton Past, 101. 

Gibbens, John E., b. Berkshire Co., 1822; set- 
Mich. Jackson Hist., 1141. 

Gibbs, David, b. 1800; set. N. Y., 1820? Vt. 
1825? Ionia Port., 316; Macomb Hist., 657. 

Deborah, of Barnstable Co., m. Elisha 

Lewis of N, Y., O. and Mich. Hillsdale 
Port., 799. 

John M., set. O., 1836? Mich., 1854. 

Ionia Port., 451. 
■ Lovilla C, b. Berkshire Co., 1836; m. 

1858 John J.Maynard of Mich. Ionia Port., 

45i- 
■ Samuel A., b. 1833; set. O., 1838., Mich., 

1854. Ionia Port., 629. 



Gibson, Sally, m. 1816? Stephen Parkhurst of 
N. Y. Branch Twent., 340. 

Gidley, Edwin, set. Mich., 1S50? Clinton 
Port., 580. 

Mary, m. 1S03 Reuben Buck of N. Y. 

Lenawee Hist. II., 287. 

GiFFORD, Anna, m. 1810? Benjamin Rouns- 
ville of N. Y. Ingham Port., S33. 

Phebe, m. 1S20? Stephen M. Mosher of 

N. Y. Hillsdale Port., S94. 

Gilbert, Charles, b. 1760? set. Wis. Hills- 
dale Port. 2S4. 

Daniel, b. Sheffield, 17S6; set. X. Y.; 

Mich., 1844. Branch Port., 292. 

Francis B., b. Greenfield, 1818; set. 

Mich., 1S37 or 40. Grand Rapids Lowell, 6S0; 
Kent, 1014. 

Hiram R., b. Worthington, 1834; set. 

Mich., 1854. Genesee Port., 612. 

Isaac, b. 1S10; set. Mich., 1840? Ma- 
comb Hist., 795. 

Lydia, m. 1820? Alvah Gannett of N. Y. 

Hillsdale Port., 2S4. 
Solomon, b. Amherst, 1809; set. Mich. 

1845. St. Clair, 675. 

Stephen, set. N. Y., Mich., 1835. Cass 

Twent., 601. 

Thomas D., b. Greenfield, 1815; set. 

Mich. 1835. Grand Rapids Lowell, 679; 
Kent, 261, 1014; St. Clair, 124. 

Giles, Ebenezer, b. Townsend, 1759; set. Vt 
Jackson Port., 548. 

Ephraim, set. Vt. 1S00? Mich., 1845. 

Jackson Port., 548. 

Gill, Samuel, set. N. Y., 1810? Muskegon 

Port., 37S. 
Gilman, John T., 1812 soldier; d. 1884; set. 

N. Y., Mich. Genesee Port., 816. 

Gilmore, Aretus, b. 1792; set. O. 1S15? 
Clinton Port., 584. 

Reuben, set. O. 1S40? Jackson Port., 

700. 

Gilson, Frank R., b. Charlestown, 1848; set. 
Mich., 1885. Berrien Port., 285. 

Gleason, Archibald, set. O., 1830? Neway- 
go, 44c 

Nathaniel, b. 1774; set. N. Y. i8c6, 

Mich., 1830. Lenawee Hist. I, 302. 

Glover, Charles W., b. 1791; set. N. Y. 1797, 
Mich., 1833. Washtenaw Port., 630. 



130 



THE MASSACHUSETTS MAGAZINE 



Orville B., b. Upton, 1804; set. X. Y., 

Mich., 1839. Cass Twent., 65, 781. 

Goddard, Ezra G., b. Worcester, 1S23; set. 
Mich., 1S62. Saginaw Port., 774. 

Rebecca S., b. Plymouth; m. 1830? 

George Perkins. Macomb Hist., 801. 

Rufus, set. X. Y., 1825? Mich., 1838. 

Ionia Hist., 354. 

Goff, Electa, m. 1S20? Anson Crawford of 
N. Y. and Mich. Ionia Port., 671. 

Sewall S., b. Royalston, 181 1; set. X. Y., 

Mich., 1829. Lenawee Illus., 99; Lenawee 
Port,, 935. 

Timothy B., b. 1790; set. N. Y., 1820, 

Mich., 1827. Lenawee Hist. I, 181. 

Good ale, Isaac, b. 1755; set. Vt. 1790? Oak- 
land Port., 758. 

Lydia C, b. Amherst, 1822; m. Silas 

Kimberly of Mich. Ionia Port., 569. 

Xorman C, b. Amherst, 1813; set. Mich., 

1835. Washtenaw Hist., 853. 
Goodell, Electa, m. 1S25? Chas. Cooley of 

N. Y. and Mich. Washtenaw Hist., 1339. 

Jacob, Revolutionary soldier; set. Vt., 

1810? d. 1828. Clinton Port., 374. 

Rachel A., m. 1835 ? Isaac Thornton of 

O. Midland, 299. 

Goodlng, Christopher, set. X. Y., Mich., 
1854. Kent, 573. 

Elnathan, b. 1771; set. X T . Y. Wash- 
tenaw Hist., 1429. 

Goodman, Enos, set. X T . Y., 1810? Branch 

Port., 549- 
Thomas, b. South Hadley, 1790; set. 

N. Y. and Mich. Branch Hist, facing 341; 

Branch Port., 549. 
Goodrich, Achsah, b. 1791; set. Mich. 

Washtenaw Hist. 591. • 
Levt H., b. Hadley, 1774; set. X T . Y., 1800? 

Mich. Xorthern M., 352. 
M. H., b. Conway, 1826; set. Mich., 1827. 

St. Clair, 122. 

Morell, b. Conway, 181 2; set. Mich., 

1827, Washtenaw Hist., 500. 

— — Sarah, b. Boston; m. 1830? Alonzo D. 
Atherton of N. H. Clinton Port., 269. 

Goodspeed, Joseph, b. Sandwich, 1797; set. 
N. Y., 1828, Mich., 1836. Cass Rogers, 
337; Cass Twent., 65. 

Goodwtn, Betsy, of Hopkinton, m. 1800? 
Xathan Gould of Mass. and X. Y. Oak- 
land Biog., 534. 



Justus, b. Lenox; set. X". Y. and Mich. 

graduate of Hamilton College, 1S21. Branch 
Hist. 205. 

Gorham, J. M., b. Boston, 1825; set. Mich., 

1849. Kent, 265. 
Gould, James H., b. in Shaker Village, 179S; 

set. X. Y. and Mich. Berrien Port., 679. 

Xathan, of Hopkinton; b. 1767; set. X". 

Y. Oakland Biog., 534. 

Grace, John C, set. Mich., 1830? Gratiot, 

295- 
Gragg, John, b. Colerain, 17S5; set. X. Y. 

1825, Mich., 1826. Hillsdale Port., 658; 

Lenawee Hist. I, 1S0. 

Robert, b. Colerain, 181 1; set. Mich., 

1825. Lenaew T e Hist. I, 180. 

Roena, b. Colerain, 1821; m. Robert 

Cox of Mich. Hillsdale Port., 658. 

Graham, Hiram, b. 1816; set. N. Y. and Mich. 

Hillsdale Port., 521. 
Wanton, b. Cheshire, 1790; set. N. Y., 

i8i5?Mich., 1S30? Lenawee Hist. I, 433. 
Granger, David, b. Sandisfield; set. X. Y., 

1830? Kalamazoo Port., 917. 

Francis, Sr., b. Hampshire Co., 1806; 

set. X. Y., O., 1830, Mich., 1852. Branch 
Port., 597, 

Mrs. Harriet, b. W. Springfield, 1797; 

set. Mich., 1834. Washtenaw Hist., 493. 

Ithamar, b. Sheffield, 1796; set. X. Y. 

and Mich. Calhoun, 141. 

Thaddeus, b. Sandisfield, 1765; set. O., 

1810. Macomb Hist., 699, 796. 

Grant, Charles, b. Colerain, 1794; set. Mich. 

1836? Saginaw Port., 547. 
Graves, Esther P., b. Hampshire Co.; m. 

1855, James W. Ransom of Mich. Kent, 1107. 

Israel, b. Whately, 17S5; set. X. Y. 

Jackson Hist., 1101. 

Jeremiah, set. Ct. and III. Berrien Port., 

345- 

Job, b. Greenfield, 1799; set. Mich., 183 1. 

Lenawee Hist. II, 245. 

Lebbeus, set., X. Y. 1S10? Kent, 743. 

Lyman, set. Mich., 1825? Washtenaw 

Port., 333, 516. 

Waters, of Colerain, set. X T . Y., 1810? 

Lenawee Illus., 159. 
Gray, , b. Ashfield; set. Mich., 1827. 

Branch Hist., 244. 

Amos, set. Vt. 1800? Washtenaw Hist., 

853. 



MICHIGAN PIONEERS 



131 



Darwin L., b. Ashfield, 1824; set. Mich., 

1836. Branch Twent., 247, 521. 

Eli, of Ashfield, set. Mich., 1S36. Branch 

Twent. 522. 

. Philip, of New Bedford; set. Mich., 1830? 

Kalamazoo Hist., 3S1. 

Sarah A., of Worcester; m. 1838 Welling- 
ton Chapman of Mich. Saginaw Port., 856. 

Thomas, Revolutionary soldier; set. 

N. Y., 1800? Wayne Chron., 216. 

Green, Henry, b. Williamstown, 1820; set. 
N. Y., 1830, or 34, Mich., 1833 or 4°- Kent, 
770; Grand Rapids City, 559, 717. 

Keziah, m. 1S20? Samuel Wilson of Vt. 

and N. Y. Genesee Port., 537, 655. 

Nathaniel, b. 1787? set. O. Newaygo* 

369- 

Noah K., b. Windsor, 1808; set. Mich., 

1835. Lenawee Illus., 412; Lenawee Port, 
914. 

Sarah, m. 1820? Appolos Long of N. Y. 

Lenawee Port., 312. 
William W., b.1839; set. N.Y., 1840 111., 

Mich., 1902. Berrien Twent., 408. 

Willit G., b. 1800; set. N. Y., 1825? 

Mich., 1840. Clinton Port., 214. 



Greenleaf, John G., b. Haverhill; set. Mich., 
1820? Berrien Twent, 651. 

Gregory, Noah, b. 1803; set. Canada, Mich. 
1836. Jackson Port., 864. 

Grey, Patience, b. 1777; m. 1800? Billions 
Stocking of N. Y. Grand Rapids Lowell 
390; Kent, 1 137. 

Gross, Johab, b. Eufield, 1790; set., Mich. 
1832. Oakland Hist., 2S3. 

Grosvenor, Ebenezer O., b. Grafton or 
Paxton, 1783; set. N. Y., 1S25, Mich. Hills- 
dale Port., 391; Monroe, 448. 

George W., set. Mich., 1840? Grand 

Rapids City, 724. 

Ira R., b. Paxton, 1815; set. Mich., 1835. 

Monroe, 448. 

Lemuel D., b. Paxton, 1830; set. N. Y., 

1852, 111., Mich. Jackson Port., 633. 

Guilford, Erastus, b. Northampton; set. O., 
Mich., 1825. Kalamazoo Hist., 440. 

Gurney, Charles W., set. Mich., 1837 or 40. 
Clinton Past., 503; Shiawassee, 527. 

Guylford, Caroline, b. 1816; m. Joseph 
Harper of Mich. Cass Hist., 175. 



C&ntict^m $c (Sommntt 



on ^on6^ anfo <£>tl|er Jjubjecti? 



A New and Notable Book for Two 
Countries. 
' "The Beginnings of the American Rev- 
olution" is the title of a book recently- 
issued by the Baker and Taylor Company 
of New York. This title might have been 
aptly extended and made, The Beginnings 
of the Revolution in London and Boston, 
since the very inception of the Revolution 
was a shortage in the royal purse at St- 
James, and its continuance a draft on the 
purses of St. Botolph's town in America. 

There are three handsome octavo vol- 
umes ; the author Ellen Chase of Brook- 
line. 

It is not a history of the American Rev- 
olution. It begins with the Stamp Act and 
ends with the nineteenth of April, 1775. 
To this period Miss Chase has given the 
most faithful and painstaking research on 
both sides of the Atlantic. It would seem 
that nothing of value had escaped the au- 
thor, and that future historians must search 
in vain for any new material. She has 
brushed away the century of accumulated 
dust from the Parliamentary records of 
England, and also from the riles of the cur- 
rent political literature of the day, and 
living pictures of the times stand forth 
clearly revealed. 

Her American readers will probably be 
surprised to find so many and such promi- 
nent men in England advocating the cause 
of the colonies, — surprised to find such ac- 
tivity of debate in Parliament among the 
Whigs, and such ardent and defiant 
speeches from great orators which should 
h^ve aroused the dull and thoughtless 
parasites of the Ministry; but instead the 
friends of freedom were voted down by 
heavy majorities. It was impossible to 
combat successfully the combined forces of 
"Lord North and the Devil" — a coalition 
often named by the pious patriots in their 



petitions to the Most High for help against 
their oppressors. This help came only 
after a mortal struggle of seven years. 
Miss Chase gives choice specimens of this 
oratory in behalf of the colonists and in 
defense of their inborn rights as English- 
men. 

The author never mounts the rostrum, 
never preaches. She haunts the gallery of 
the Reporter, and gives us the benefit of 
her critical observation and keen analysis. 

As an illustration of the style and meth- 
od of Miss Chase in her treatment of the 
more important events occurring in Bos- 
ton, we call especial attention to her de- 
scription of the Boston Massacre. Surely 
her headquarters, on the night of March 5, 
1770, must have been on State street, and 
she in wireless communication with every 
part of the city wherever there was any 
unusual disturbance or friction, so full and 
vivid are her delineations of the scattered 
events of that fateful night, and generally 
with the attendant personal equation. 
Here we appear to find in detail every- 
thing that was done or said, the names 
of those who said it or did it, who saw or 
heard it ; the particulars of every encoun- 
ter in whatever part of the town. We see 
the smoke of every shot, and shrink from 
every square foot of ground bearing the 
sanguine stain. But the blood will flow 
a little faster in the hearts of those who 
find men of their own family names in the 
thick of it — perhaps even their own ances- 
tors. 

Hardly less carefully has Miss Chase led 
us through the Parliamentary debates in 
London on the taxation of the colonies to 
the final act of placing, — 

"A thripence a pound on tea." 

Then she gives a graphic account of the 
most renowned Tea Party on record. 

Among the many Tea Party ballads de- 
scribing this notable event, I have never 
seen the following extract in print : — 



CRITICISM AND COMMENT 



133 



Tea on the Bay in flotsam lay, 
Where fanners fed the fishes ; 

Tea freed from tax by thumps and 
thwacks, 
Despite King George, his wishes. 

Miss Chase's keen sense of humor is total- 
ly repressed while she gives a detailed and 
vivid account of Col. Leslie's fiasco at 
Salem. How he with his three hundred 
men marched over the drawbridge and then 
marched back again. Her relation of the 
affair is serious but dramatic, the comedy 
itself barely escaping being a tragedy and 
the opening scene of the Revolution. 

This brings us to the field of the author's 
most persistent research and her greatest 
success — the epoch-making nineteenth of 
April. Her labors here are, to a remarka- 
able degree, minute and accurate, and I 
have seen nothing to compare in fullness 
with her account of the unlooked-for and 
startling events of that day. 

Some of the family anecdotes are, per- 
haps, trivial in themselves, but each has a 
fitting place as part of the picture in giv- 
ing tone and color to the realistic whole. 

An exhaustive search was made in the 
contemporary English newspapers and 
magazines, and extracts are given to show 
how the news of this days' work was re- 
ceived in England. Much has been brought 
to light that is both interesting and en- 
lightening. 

All fair-minded historians will be pleased 
with the impartial coloring given to con- 
troversial themes. The author's life in 
London could not have been passed with- 
out leaving some impress upon her and 
broadening her view of the contest; al- 
though no one can mistake her intense 
patriotic sympathies. 

The work is a fine piece of bookmaking. 
The paper, type and binding leave noth- 
ing to be desired. The illustrations are 
numerous including many rare portraits. 
A more complete index and a system of 
marginal dates would have been a great 
assistance to the reader. Perhaps these 
features will be considered in the forth- 
coming London edition. 

George Sheldon. 



History of King's County, Nova Scotia. 

"As the most prosperous part of the 
whole Acadian country in French times," 
says Dr. Eaton in the preface to this not- 
able volume*, "and as the scene of con- 



spicuous events at the tragical period of 
the 'Acadian expulsion, King's County, 
Xova Scotia, will always have a wider 
interest for the world than is possible with 
most rural localities." And it may be 
said at once that King's County is fortu- 
nate in her historian, and in the worthy 
setting that the publishers have given to 
his work. 

Dr. Eaton has chosen to treat his sub- 
ject topically rather than chronologically, 
or, rather, he has applied the chronological 
method to a topical arrangement. In this 
way we have a full discussion of such 
important subjects as the development of 
the church in Xova Scotia so presented as 
to show the origin and growth and present 
status of the great ecclesiastical organiza- 
tions of the Anglicans, the Congregational- 
ists, the Presbyterians, the Baptists, the 
Methodists, and others. 

The domestic life and conditions are 
considered in an especially interesting 
chapter. For the first three-quarters of a 
century in the history of the province 
licenses to marry without the publication 
of banns were strictly withheld from 
dissenters from the church of England, and, 
a license secured, it was invariably ad- 
dressed to some minister of the Anglican 
church, never to one of another denomina- 
tion. These restrictions became more and 
more intolerable to the great body of dis- 
senters, who properly declared the discrim- 
ination against them to be an infringe- 
ment of the liberty in religion that had 
been promised them when they came to 
the province. But the law was not re- 
pealed until 1832. 

A marriage accomplished, however, we 
can gather from Dr. Eaton's work the ex- 
ceedingly primitive conditions under which 
the life of the home developed. Almost 
everything people in the country-places 
used was home made. Carts, sleds, plows, 
rakes, trays, brooms, and baskets the 
good-man farmer made for himself; while 
within the house his help-mate carried on 
the activities of a soap factory, a candle 
factory, a cheese factory, and a cloth 
factory. They were the rough pioneer 
conditions that our Xew England fore- 
fathers faced and overcame. And of 
course a great proportion of these early 
settlers were indeed New England men. 

A systematic attempt to encourage im- 
migration from Xew England was under- 
taken in the fall of 1758, and between that 



134 



THE MASSACHUSETTS MAGAZINE 



date and the outbreak of the Revolutionary 
war, the tide set thitherward from Xew 
England and particularly from Connecti- 
cut. Then came the wide-spread Loyalist 
migration between 1776 and 1784, during 
which almost the whole of the pre-revolu- 
tionary aristocracy of Boston, and multi- 
tudes from Xew York, Xew Jersey, and 
colonies further south landed at the ports 
of Halifax, Sherburne, and Annapolis 
Royal. The Loyalist influence is carefully 
discussed by Dr. Eaton in connection with 
some of the individual towns in King's 
County — Aylesford, p-arrsborough, Kent- 
ville, etc. The complete history of this 
great movement remains yet to be written, 
but Dr. Eaton has made important contri- 
butions to the work in so far as it touches 
this central and coast_county of western 
Nova Scotia. 

Another subject that the author treats 
with especial fulness and authority is the 
religious and ecclesiastical history of King's 
Here again he is upon ground made familiar 
to him by patient and scholarly first-hand 
investigation, and the results of his work 
are of the highest value to every student 
of Canadian history. Readers familiar 
with Dr. Eaton's work on "The Church of 
England in Xova Scotia, and the Tory 
Clergy of the Revolution" (Xew York, 
1891) know the thoroughness of method 
and the wealth of detail with which the 
general subject has been treated, and know 
also the author's clear, attractive, and 
flexible English style. The same qualities 
mark the corresponding chapters in this 
work, with the advantage for King's 
County of being subjected to a higher 
magnifying power than was possible in the 
preceding book, and the disclosure of ad- 
ditional and oftentimes most interesting 
details. The remarkable Alline revival 
and the establishment of the Xew Light 
churches form one of the most striking 
episodes in the history of King's and Hants 
Counties, and the figure of Henry Alline 
takes on 'a distinctness of personal quali- 
ties that helps the reader to understand 
the sources of his power. 

Other chapters discuss the educational 
history of King's, including a valuable 
summary of the history of Acadia Uni- 
versity. The chapter upon "Literature, 
Authors, Xewspapers" adds to the histori- 
cal material nearly forty pages of illustra- 
tive quotations, showing the wealth of 



literature that has had its inspiration in 
this heart of the Acadian land. The busi- 
ness and political life of the county has 
been the object of careful investigation 
and record. King's is essentially an agri- 
cultural and fruit-raising region, and the 
development along these lines furnishes a 
chapter of great interest and suggestive- 
ness. And of somewhat kindred character 
is the absorbing story of "Roads, Travel- 
ing, Dykes," with its vivid pictures of the 
struggles and the progress toward modern 
means of communication. From the dyke- 
building days of the early Acadians to the 
county's own railroad — the Central Valley 
Railway, now a part of the Dominion 
Atlantic Railway's system — the story of the 
protection of the land and the providing of 
facilities for travel is told with a clearness 
of style that satisfies the historical instinct 
and at the same time appeals to the imag- 
inative sense. An admirable view of the 
extent and importance of the dykes is 
quoted from the work of Dr. Benjamin 
Rand. 

But to many readers the crowning fea- 
ture of the work will be found in its re- 
markable sections dealing with biography 
and genealogy. More than 400 pages of 
the great book are thus occupied. Follow- 
ing the formal historical chapters comes 
the division of "Biographies," and this in 
turn is succeeded by nearly 350 pages of 
"Family Sketches." Into this part of his 
work Dr. Eaton has put the investigation 
and labor of years. Almost every promi- 
nent family, directly or indirectly connected 
with the history of King's County, finds here 
its genealogical record set forth with ful- 
ness and precision, and of the active leaders 
in all lines of effort there are valuable 
biographical sketches. Only those who 
have undertaken similar work can fully 
appreciate the greatness of the task Dr. 
Eaton set himself, or realize the great 
measure of the success he has achieved. 
It has been a labor of love and it bears 
eloquent testimony to the industry and 
the devoted loyalty of the author. It re- 
mains only to add that the volume is 
provided with a careful and adequate index. 
John E. Chapman'. 

*The History of King's County, Nova Scotia: 
Heart of the Acadian Land. By Arthur Went- 
worth Hamilton Eaton, M. A., D. C. L. Salem, 
Mass., The Salem Press Company, 1910. 



^urllftUon&T j^&tjtsr 



Rev. Thomas Ilrajsklin Waters. 



THE recent disastrous fire in the State 
Capitol at Albany, followed shortly- 
after by the blaze in our own State 
House in dangerous proximity to valuable 
records, which by a happy chance caused 
only trifling damage, have called public 
attention sharply to the general insecurity 
of libraries. For the most part the build- 
ings, in which the collections are housed, 
make no pretense of being fire-proof. Many 
are wooden structures and exposed to all 
the risks from within and without, to which 
any wooden building is liable. The more 
substantial brick or stone buildings are 
hardly more secure. However protected 
by slated roofs and iron shutters at the 
windows, a fire starting in the interior is 
likely to cause great damage, if not com- 
plete destruction. 

To be sure, all such property may be 
insured, and the insurance would cover a 
large proportion of the loss in most cases, 
as the really valuable volumes and chief 
literary treasures are few. But every 
library that has attained the dignity of a 
century, or even a half century, has grown 
rich in its precious volumes, its valuable 
documents. Our college libraries contain 
treasures of inestimable value. The Essex 
Institute Library in Salem has attained 
honorable renown for the quality as well 
as the size of its great collection. The 
New England Historic-Genealogical Society 
has gathered a vast body of genealogic 
and historical material which could never 
be replaced. This Society has been pain- 
fully conscious of the dangers to which it 
is exposed for many years and is now 
making a determined effort to secure funds 



for a modern building. Unfortunately the 
response to its appeals has been discour- 
agingly small up to this time. But how 
many other Boards of Trustees in our 
Commonwealth face a situation of equal 
peril and give no sign of alarm ! They owe 
a great debt to generous friends of their 
libraries, who have bequeathed their books 
and funds, to safeguard them properly. 
They owe a greater debt to the many gen- 
erations who are to come, who would 
mourn the loss of the treasures now in 
their keeping. Instead of founding new 
libraries, public attention might well be 
fixed on making those that now exist more 
secure. Instead of buying more books, 
some portion of the available funds might 
be spent in the instalment of a fire-proof 
vault for the most valuable things, or ap- 
proved devices to increase the security of 
their buildings. 

*. 

BUT the question of the safety of lit- 
erary treasures, which could never 
be replaced, if lost, is larger than 
the question of the security of public 
buildings. Many boxes and chests of an- 
cient papers, there is reason to believe, 
are stacked in damp cellars or tucked 
away in lofts in out-of-the-way cor- 
ners. Now and then a curious book- 
worm discovers their unsuspected value 
and they are rescued from their danger 
and neglect. For many years, sundry 
great cases filled with public documents 
were badgered about from pillar to post in 
Boston. Good luck only saved them from 
the junk-dealer or the flames. But the 
time came, when at great expense, skilled 



136 



THE MASSACHUSETTS MAGAZINE 



hands labored for years in cleaning, mount- 
ing and indexing those despised papers, 
which now have an honored place in the 
archives of the Supreme Court. How many 
smaller but valuable collections await 
their resurrection day ! Selectmen and city 
officials, town and city clerks, are not al- 
ways aware of the value of such neglected 
public records, and they never come to the 
knowledge of the State Commissioner, who 
inspects the public records and the security 
of vaults or safes in which they are kept. 
These vaults, moreover, are of limited size, 
and the multiplicity of public records in 
constant use exhausts their capacity. So 
the bundles and boxes of Revolution- 
ary papers, and long forgotten books, 
which would be hailed with paroxysms of 
delight by the student of Town History, 
are left to themselves, in imminent peril 
from many dangers. Before this spasm of 
righteous regard for safety has spent itself. 
may not a Commission for searching out 
neglected treasures be recognized as a sen- 
sible and useful addition to our State 
Boards ? 

Still peril lurks nearer home. Who can 
estimate the value of the heirlooms and 
treasures of many kinds, hidden away in 
the comfortable old mansions, which have 
been the homes of generations of worthy 
families in every town and village? 

NOT infrequently, some old man or 
his heirs sells a piece of property, 
and then, at last, to establish his 
title, a file of old, unrecorded deeds is 
brought forth from the secret drawer of 
his desk, or the upper drawer of the bu- 
reau, where they have been lying thirty, 
forty, perhaps fifty years, and recorded in 
the Registry of Deeds. These deeds may 
contain exact boundaries, which may settle 
disputes as to boundary lines, or gene- 
alogical data of great value, or they may 
complete the pedigree of the property. A 



surprising number of such deeds doubtless 
exist, for they are found very frequently. 
If every owner of them could be roused to 
the real wrong to the public by hiding 
them away, and led to enter them in the 
public records, he would suffer no loss, and 
the great public, now and forever, would 
gain. 

OTHER heir-looms are guarded with 
jealous pride. On the wall of the 
sitting room of a quaint old home, 
the framed letter of Washington to an 
honored ancestor, a hero of the Revolution, 
hangs in the very place it may have occu- 
pied for a century. It was written in one 
of the darkest hours of the Revolution, 
and it assigned a service of extraordinary 
significance. The pecuniary value of that 
document may be great, its sentimental 
value is beyond price. It is too precious 
a relic to risk the liability to harm or ruin. 
Yet it is wholly improbable that regard 
for its safety, or for the satisfaction of 
remote generations of this family line to 
whom it should descend, would induce its 
owners to place it in an absolutely secure 
place of deposit. 

OUAIXT old business account books 
record the every-day doings of an 
ancient neighborhood, interject 
juicy bits of family history, and furnish a 
wealth of color for the student of the 
period. 

How many of the beautiful and costly 
communion services of the old churches are 
kept in the deacon's dwelling, in the box 
or basket which has been their only pro- 
tection for years! How many volumes of 
Church and Parish Records, venerable and 
precious, how many records of school dis- 
tricts, old pasture corporations and land 
companies of the greatest value to the 
whole community, are hidden away in 
drawers and closets ! The safety of all 
these is a question of grave concern, and 
it is becoming in every broad-minded indi- 
vidual or family to face it fairly. 



THE 



MASSACHVSETTS 
MAGAZINE 




Published bythe Salem Press Co. Salem, Mass. USA 



3TI|c jHassarfjusdfs JHagannc. 

A Quarterly c7VIagazine Devoted to History, Genealogy and Biography 

Thomas Franklin Waters, Editor, ipswich, mass. 

ASSOCIATE AXD ADVISORY EDITORS - 



George Sheldon, 

DEBRFIELC. MASS. 

Charles A. Flagg, 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 



Dr. Frank A. Gardner, 

SALEM, MASS. 

John* X. McClintock. 

DORlMK-iTEK. MASS. 



Lucie M. Gardner, 

SALEM, M Utt. 

Albert W Dennis, 

SALEM, M IS*. 



Issued in January, April, July and October. Subscription, $2.50 per year, Single copies, 75c 



VOL. IV 



JULY, 191 1 



NO. 3 



Contents of tins Jositt 



Thomas Wentworth Higginson . Ex-Gov. John D. Long, Edwin 
D. Mead, Frank B. Sanborn and Frank A. Gardner, M.D. 

The Howland House Francis R. Stoddard, Jr. 

Massachusetts Pioneers in Michigan .... Charles A. Flagg 
Colonel Thomas Gardner's Regiment F. A. Gardner, M.D. 

Massachusetts in Literature Charles A. Flagg 

Department of the American Revolution F. A. Gardner, M.D. 

Family Genealogies Lucie M. Gardner 

Our Editorial Pages Thomas F. Waters 



139 
145 
147 
153 
174 
179 
184 
199 



CORRESPONDENCE of a business nature should be sent to The Massachusetts Magazine, Salem, Mass. 
CORRESPONDENCE in regard to contributions to the Magazine may be sent to the editor, Rev. T. F. 
Waters, Ipswich, Mass., or to the office of publication In Salem. 

BOOKS for review may be sent to the office of publication in Salem. Books should not be sent to individual 
editors of the Magazine, unless by previous correspondence the editor consents to review the Ixjok. 

SUBSCRIPTIONS should be sent to The Massachusetts Magazine, Salem, Mass. Subscriptions are *2.50 
payable in advance, post paid to any address in the United States or Canada. To foreign countries in the 
Postal Union, £2.75. Single copies of back numbers, To cents ea 

REMITTANCES may l>e made in currency or two cent postasre stamps; many subscriptions are sent through 
the mail in this way, and they are seldom'lost, but such remittances must be at the risk of the sender. To 
avoid all danger of lo-s send by post-office money order, bank check, or express money order. 

CHANGES OF ADDRESS. When a subscriber makes a change of address, he should notify the publishers, 
giving both his old and new addresses. The publishers cannot be responsible for lost copies, if they are not 
notified of such changes. 

ON SALE. Copies of this magazine are on sale in Boston, at W. B. Clark's A Co., 26 Tremont Street, Old 
Corner Book Store, J'J Brom field Street, Geo. L. Littletield, 67 Cornhill, Smith & McCance, 38 Brom field street; 
\n Xew York, at .John Wanamaker's, Broadway, 4th, 9th and 10th Streets; in Philadelphia, Am. Baptist Pub. 
Society, 1630 Chestnut Street; in Washington, at Brentanos, F & 13th St.: in Chicago, at A. C. McClurg's & Co.. 
221 Wabash Ave.; in London, at B. F. Stevens & Brown, 4 Trafalgar Sq. Also on sale at principal stands of 
N. E. News Co. 

Entered as second-class matter March 13, 1008, at the post-office at Salem, Mass., under the act of Congress 
of March 3, 1879. Office of publication, 300 Essex Street, Salem, Mass. 




THOMAS WENTWORTH HIGGINSON 



Tributes by Ex-Governor John D. Long, Edwin D. Mead, 
Frank B. Sanborn and Frank A. Gardner, M.D. 



(John D. Long, Ex-Governor of Massachusetts.) 

We had in Col. Higginson a typical representative of a distinctive 
New England caste. He was one of the last of what Dr. Holmes has 
called the Brahmins. He was the last survivor of that brilliant literary 
group which fifty years ago were most conspicuous in American letters. 
His long life spanned the arch from the simple provincial life of Boston 
and Cambridge to the present day of heterogeneous and mixed population, 
taste and culture. Yet he kept always abreast of the tide, in sympathy 
with what is best in it, and in helpful effort to lift and reform whatever in 
it is depressed and lacking. 

It was a varied life — that of scholar, clergyman, author, soldier, 
politician, lawmaker, lecturer, public-spirited citizen and, in his octogen- 
arian years, the dean of our literature and of all matters of cultivated taste 
and practical philosophy. 

In the anti-slavery days he was one of the most earnest and active in 
the cause of freedom. He proved the convictions of his spoken word by 
putting it into the deed of patriotic service, enlisting in the army of the 
Union at the sacrifice if need were of life itself, and taking command of a 
colored regiment. At his funeral the gratitude of the enfranchised negro, 
in whom his devoted interest never failed, had touching evidence in the 
group of colored men who bore his coffin to its resting place. 



140 THE MASSACHUSETTS MAGAZINE 

His literary works in verse and prose are a monument to his ad- 
mirable style, his wide range of reading, his classic erudition, and his 
cheerful and felicitous thought and expression. Some of his poems 
reached that high merit that they are now among our household and fa- 
miliar hyms and verses. 

Of the most liberal religious views, his reverence was profound. 
There was nothing narrow in his theology, as there was nothing narrow 
in his social, political and humanitarian principles and the expression of 
hem. His was a broad, catholic, open mind. He was a member and 
officer in many of our literary, esthetic and reform clubs. 

As a citizen he was a born reformer, active in all good causes. His 
convictions on public questions were always firm and clear. He was 
fearless in giving them pronouncement. I think he liked contact with his 
fellow-men, to take part in their debate, to co-operate and sympathize 
with their endeavors, and to serve with them in the ranks or lead them 
in any crusade for righteousness. He came to be almost the most strik- 
ing figure among us, known of all, saluted with veneration by all who 
met him, still a type, in his octogenarian years, of physical, intellectual, 
moral beauty — genial, manly, alert, friend, — comrade, philosopher, guide. 
— Manibus date lilia plenis. 
Hingham. Mass. 



(Edwin D. Mead, Author and Lecturer ) 
A lifelong champion of freedom, political freedom, religious freedom, 
industrial freedom, literary independence, the emancipation of the slave, 
the equal rights of woman, justice to every race and every man, such 
pre-eminently was Thomas Wentworth Higginson. 

Colonel Higginson's books are books of freedom ; his friends were 
friends of freedom. He gave to us in 1898 that most noble, frank and 
fascinating of autobiographies, "Cheerful Yesterdays;" and, just as he 
asked us to see to it that we did not omit the word "freedom" from our 
political vocabulary, there came to us his "Contemporaries," which may 
properly enough be considered a second volume of the autobiography. 
These books are necessary companions, each supplementing the other. 
In his "Yesterdays," Colonel Higginson pictures the scenes and the 
events in which he and his strong contemporaries acted together ; in his 



THOMAS WENTWORTH HIGGINSON 141 

''Con temporaries," he paints the portraits of the noble men and women 
who helped to make his yesterdays brave and great, and therefore in the 
noblest sense cheerful. The two books together give us a survey, not 
surpassed in insight and value by any other, of the intellectual and moral 
life of New England and America during the last two generations. 
They remind us of the high credentials of this brave spokesman for free- 
dom by bringing before us as they do the hard and trying times when 
calmly and as firmly he "stood in companies where nine-tenths of those 
present were on the other side." They also serve to make us think anew 
of the immense service, both as a man of letters and a man of action, 
which Colonel Higainson has rendered America. 

Higginson somewhere discusses, I think ironically, somebody's dic- 
tum that "a foreign nation is a kind of contemporaneous posterity." 
Whatever truth or falsehood may be in that word, this I think is true, — 
that insight discounts history and does not have to wait for the verdict of 
posterity. Of insight only is this true. The man of fashion and the 
fool have no instinct that can tell where God is on the field in their own 
place and time. To the conventional man of Boston and of the nation, 
the period of the great heroes of these glowing pages w r as "a time when 
truth was called treason." How quickly was the conventional verdict 
set aside ! "It is a striking fact," Higginson notes at the close of his 
essay on Garrison, "that in the valhalla of contemporary statues in his 
own city, only two, those of Webster and Everett, commemorate those 
who stood for the party of conservatism in the great anti-slavery conflict ; 
while all the rest, Lincoln, Quincy, Sumner, Andrew, Mann, Garrison 
and Shaw, represent the party of attack. It is the verdict of time, con- 
firming in bronze and marble the great words of Emerson, 'What forests 
of laurel we bring, and the tears of mankind, to those who stood firm 
against the opinion of their contemporaries !' " But to the eye of Emerson 
himself his contemporaries were as the immortals. To him history and 
the newspaper were one ; and he knew John Brown for a hero while the 
musketry yet rattled at Harper's Ferry as truly as the men of Concord 
Bridge, whose shot had been heard round the world and been applauded 
all along the line. To Higginson also the men with whom he labored in 
the cause of freedom were the same men and held the same rank when 
they were contemporaries as when they became memories and their 
statues stood in the streets. 



142 THE MASSACHUSETTS MAGAZINE 

In the great group of American fighters for freedom, Colonel Hig- 
ginson will hold an immortal place. Gladstone, at Oxford, in his late 
life reviewed the changes through which he had passed since he began 
his public career as rf the rising hope of the stern and unbending Tories," 
and said : "I have come to place a higher and ever higher value upon 
human liberty, and there, and there only, is the secret of the change. " 
With Colonel Hio-crinson there has been no chancre. His whole life was 
one great sermon on freedom. He began his public career as its cham- 
pion ; his long years have all been spent in its service ; and now when his 
presence is withdrawn, his word will still be heard charging the republic 
never to give that sacred and commanding word a second place. 

Boston, Mass. 

(Frank B. Sanborn, Journalist and Author.) 
My friend of nearly sixty years, Wentworth Higginson, rendered 
many services to liberty, to literature and to the general cause of civiliza- 
tion during his long life of constant activity ; but his best service was in 
the four years from June 1856 to the summer of i860 ; when he actively 
carried forward the cause of freedom in Kansas, and supported the timely 
heroism of John Brown. Returning from a visit to Fayal in the summer 
of 1856, he found the North violently agitated over the assault on 
Charles Sumner and the slaveholders' invasion of Kansas, ending in the 
destruction of Lawrence. He joined in the movement to send men and 
money to the rescue of Kansas from the vile hordes who were determined 
to drive out our anti-slavery pioneers, and to prevent others from settling 
there. I was already engaged, the preceding May, in the same cause, 
as was Dr. Howe in Boston, and I had become secretary of the Middlesex 
County Kansas Committee. Higginson, then living at Worcester, be- 
came the most active member of the Worcester County Committee ; and 
out of these and Dr. Howe's Faneuil Hall Committee, grew the State 
Kansas Committee, of which our wealthy and generous friend, George 
Stearns of Medford, became Chairman in July 1856. But for a month 
or two, we three, Howe, Higginson and Sanborn, were more active and 
efficient than Mr. Stearns and his Committee. On July 8, when we had 
raised several thousand dollars in Middlesex, and more was raised in 
Worcester and Suffolk, the impatience of Higginson thus expressed itself 
in a letter to me : 



THOMAS WENTWORTH HIGGINSON 143 

"At present the policy of the greater part of New England is ab- 
solute inaction ; even the money raised is not spent. The State Com- 
mittee, which I labored to organize, seems as useless as the Faneuil Hall 
Committee. We are treating Kansas as England treated her army in the 
Crimea. You can imagine how painful it is to have letters daily from 
persons longing to go to Kansas" (as fighters), "all over New England, 
— and to have nothing to offer them. I have now forty such on my list, 
besides a company of 30 on Cape Cod, and unlimited offers from men at 
Bangor. The meeting at Buffalo" (at which the National Kansas Com- 
mittee was organized), "is the only hope of the West, and mine; yet I 
have not much hope from it. After that, if nothing else offers, and the 
State Committee will do nothing, I shall go back to the old way, and try 
to raise means to send a party on my own hook." 

The Committees, National and State, from about July 20, gave ac- 
tive efforts, and along with what John Brown, Samuel Walker and 
others had already done in Kansas, and the timely money sent on by 
Howe for the Faneuil Hall Committee, they prevented the slave party 
from driving out our friends in the months from April to October, 1856. 
Higginson had just returned from St. Louis when he thus wrote. He 
assisted in raising a party with which, at the end of summer, he entered 
Kansas, where he made the acquaintance of the nominal leaders of the 
free-state party, but not of Brown or Montgomery. "A Ride through 
Kansas," published by him in October 1856, gave a vivid picture of things 
as they then were ; and he returned to continue his activity through the 
succeeding winter. In January 1857, he saw John Brown in Boston 
and Worcester, and became, as I did, his devoted friend and supporter. 
This led to our joining with Dr. Howe, Gerrit Smith, George Stearns 
and Theodore Parker, in Brown's Virginia plans, which Higginson un- 
derstood, and enthusiastically favored. Upon Brown's capture, Higgin- 
son organized a movement for his rescue from prison, which was checked 
by Brown's instant refusal to have lives sacrificed, and that of his jailer 
endangered, by such an attempt. A few months later, with the aid of 
James Montgomery and with money contributed, among others, by W. W. 
Thayer, then of Boston, Higginson arranged for the relief of Stevens and 
Hazlitt, Brown's men, from the same Charlestown prison, had it been 
possible. Montgomery, the bravest of the brave, decided it was not 
feasible in winter, and the party broke up at Harrisburg. 



Hi THE MASSACHUSETTS MAGAZINE 

Free Kansas furnished the Union cause in the Civil war with the 
means of holding Missouri in the Union, and guarding the rich terri- 
tories west and southwest from occupation by the rebels. Brown's cap- 
ture and death converted millons to the anti-slavery cause, and prepared 
the North for emancipation by force. To the cause of free Kansas and of 
Brown, Higginson was a powerful auxiliary ; and his record therein is 
his best of many titles to grateful remembrance. 
Concord, Mass., June 20, 1911. 

(Frank A- Girlner, 31. D., Vice-President of the Old Planters Society.) 

The writer was privileged to know Colonel Thomas Wentworth Higginson, 
only during the last twelve years of his long and valuable life, while he 
served as president of the Old Planters Society, which he assisted in found- 
ing. His accurate knowledge of the history of the Pilgrim-Planter period 
(1620-30) and consequent regret at the lack of recognition of the founders of 
the Massachusetts Bay Colony, by many historical writers, made him partic- 
ularly zealous in his work in connection with the society. Historical accu- 
racy was always a matter of prime importance to him and he greatly la- 
mented the careless way in which some writers of prominence repeated the 
mistakes of others neglecting to make even a casual inspection of the avail- 
able original records. Earnest, enthusiastic endeavor, was characteristic of 
this remarkable man throughout his entire career, and when once he com- 
menced a task or labor of love it was certain to be accomplished thoroughly 
and with accuracy. 

His wonderful personality impressed everyone with whom he came in 
contact and advancing years brought with them none of the bitterness so 
often displayed. He was essentially optimistic and not only looked for but 
found the bright side of the present day problems. The writer recalls how 
he described with pleasure the long procession of happy and prosperous 
people seen by him, wending their way to church on the Sunday morning 
previous, and contrasted their condition with that of their grandfathers who 
had come to Cambridge to work as day laborers upon the railroads then be- 
ing constructed. He took great delight in the present day prosperity of 
these people of alien blood and read national advancement in their successes. 

His personal graces and kindly instincts remained with him to the last 
and he made all to feel that advancing years were a blessing and extreme 
age only an added opportunity given to man for the purpose of still further 
helping his fellow men. 
Salem, Mass. 



!f* ..... '.. , . - 



-***£ 



S 






m? 






*;>--' "-'■- ■■■■ ' % , 



• 









raX:V* 



; Si 



; ^t % 



'^ 



if* 



»n* 






•i •■ « . 









■i ■*$& 



■ 



i 



. 



a 



THE HOWLAND HOUSE 



One of the oldest houses in Plymouth and one most associated with 
the Pilgrims is that on Sandwich street, known as the Howland house. 
It has sometimes been called, from its later occupants, the Carver house. 
The land upon which the house is situated was granted by the town to 
Jacob Mitchell in 1667. He had then been married but a short time, and 
built part of the present house probably as a residence for his bride. In 
1669 he settled at Dartmouth, where he and his wife were killed by the 
Indians at the commencement of King Philip's war. When Mr. Mitchell 
left Plymouth, the house was bought by Jabez Howland, son of John 
Howland, the Pilgrim. 

John Howland, thirteenth signer of the Compact, came to Plymouth 
in the Mayflower with the family of Governor John Carver. It has been 
claimed that his wife (Elizabeth Tilley, also a Mayflower passenger) 
was a grand-daughter of the Governor. John Howland soon grew to be 
a power in the little settlement. He, with Governor Bradford and six 
others, assumed the entire debt of the colonists and secured their freedom 
from the company in England that had financed them. Howland at one 
time commanded the Plymouth territory on the Kennebec river, was a 
representative in the Legislature and an Assistant Governor of the Colony. 
He was one of the most active of the early settlers. When Jabez Howland 
bought the old house, his father and mother were still alive and it is a 
fair assumption that they have both been within its walls. This is the 
only house still standing in the town of Plymouth that, to a practical cer- 
tainty, has sheltered passengers of the Mayflower. Jabez Howland 
served the Colony in various capacities. As a Lieutenant under Colonel 



146 THE MASSACHUSETTS MAGAZINE 

Benjamin Church, he rendered distinguished service during King Philip's 
war. His military activities impressed upon him the value of the Narra- 
gansett country, and in 1680 he settled at Bristol, Rhode Island, where 
he was Lieutenant in the town's company, first Town Clerk, an Assessor, 
a Selectman and a member of the Colonial Legislature. 

When Mr. Howland left Plymouth, he sold the house to Elkanah 
Watson, whose son John sold it to Stephen Churchill in 1707. In 1790 
Judge Joshua Thomas, who had come into possession of the house, sold 
it to Nathaniel Carver whose family owned it until 1867. That year it 
was sold to James E. Sherman, who sold it to Barnabas H. Holmes, who 
in 1883 sold it to his daughter Helen R. Holmes. An association formed 
for the purpose of preserving the house has been trying to buy it from its 
present owners. 

The house was originally a six or eight feet post house ; and it would 
seem from an examination of the old rafters that the roof has been raised 
three times. While the house is therefore more modern in appearance, 
yet the main room remains in nearly the original condition as when Jabez 
Howland occupied it as a home and entertained his parents the venerable 
John and Elizabeth How r land. The photograph was taken by Mr. x\. S. 
Burbank of Plymouth. 



(This is the ninth instalment of a series of articles on Massachusetts Pioneers to other states, to be 
published by The Massachusetts Magazine.] 

MASSACHUSETTS PIONEERS. 
MICHIGAN SERIES. 



By Charles A. Flagg 



Besides the abbreviations of book titles, (explained on pages 76, 77, 78 and 79 of April, and page 18G of 
July, 1908 issues) the following are used: b. for born; d. for died; m. for married; set. for settled in. 



Hadsell, Fred A., set. Mich., 1855. Cass 

Twent., 365. 
Hague, Fannie I., m. 1S67, Charles Smith 

of Mich. Northern P., 410. 
Haight, Mary J., m. 1840? Allen Kennedy 

of Mich. Jackson Hist., 944. 
Halbert, Seth, set. N. Y., 1825? Midland, 

211. 
Hale, C. D., b. Berkshire Co.; set. Mich., 

1862. Lake Huron, 143. 

Charles P., b. Bernardston, 1828: set. 

Mich., 1851. Kalamazoo Hist., 482; Kal- 
amazoo Port., 446. 

David B., set. Vt., 1780? Ingham 

Hist., 483. 

Henry B., b. 1808; set. Mich. Jackson 

Hist., 856. 

Israel, set. Mich., 1866, O. Lenawee 

Port., 422. 

L. D.,b. Franklin Co., 1806; set. N. Y., 

1818; Mich., 1839. Washtenaw Hist., 
1001. 

Mary F., b. Norwich, 1848; m. 1867, 

Martin Odell of Mich., Lenawee Port., 
422. 

Stephen, set. N. Y., 1818. Washtenaw 

Hist., 1001. 

— — Susan, m. 1810? Ebenezer Stuart of 
N. Y. Macomb Hist., 805. 

Zer'ock, set. Vt., Wis., Mich.;d. 1866. 

Kalamazoo Port., 407. 

Hall, Abner, b. Dedham, 1755; set. Vt., 
1600? Lenawee Hist. I, 418; Lenawee 
Port., 253. 

Alfred, b. Berkshire Co., 1796; set. 

N. Y., Mich., 1836. Jackson Hist., 903. 

Catherine, m. 1815? Newland Samp- 
son of N. Y. and Mich., Hillsdale Port., 
369. 



E., set. X. Y., 1800? Washtenaw 

Hist., 1398. 

Eunice of Lanesboro; m. 1S00? Abner 

Bagg of Mass. and N. Y. Wavne Chron., 
357. 

George C, b. 1820; set. N. Y. San- 
ilac, 248. 

Julia, m. 1835? James Westover of 

Mass., Ct. and Ind. Genesee Port., 579. 

Prince B., set. Vt., 1790' Harvard 

graduate. Lenawee Port., 1201. 

Rowena, m. 1830? Storm Arnold of 

Mich. Oakland Biog., 623. 

Rufus, set. Mich., 1825? Oakland 

Biog., 310. 

Seth, b. Franklin Co., 1815; set. N.Y. 

and Mich. Hillsdale Port., 692. 

Susan, b. Berlin; m. 1830' Stephen 

Peckham of X. Y. Keat, 1318. 

Halverson, Joseph, b. 1630; set. N. Y.; 

Mich., 1841. Traverse, 318. 
Hamilton, Abigail, b. 1792; set., Mich., 

Washtenaw Hist., 590. 

Increase S., b. Cummington, 1810; set. 

N. Y. 1818; Mich., 1835. Lenawee 
Port., 1076; Lenawee Hist. II, 237. 

John L. b. Cheshire? 1797; set. N. Y., 

O., 1834; Mich., 1837; Ind. Lenawee 
Port., 398. 

Lucy, m. 1820? Peregrine D wight of 

Mass. and X. Y., d. 18b0. Jackson 
Port., 258. 

Mila A., m. 1824, Frederick P. Hatch 

of Mass. and Mich. Homer, 46. 

Milo D., b. Blandford, 1828; set. 



Mich., 1835. Homer, 45. 
— Obadiah, b. Pelham or Salem; set. 
N. Y., 1818. Lenawee Hist. II, 237; 
Lenawee Port., 399; 1076. 



148 



THE MASSACHUSETTS MAGAZINE 



— Patrick, b. Stockbridge, 1794; set. 
Mich., 182-3. Cass Hist., facing 188. 

— Samuel W., b. Granville, 1801; set. 
Mich., 1835; d. 1851. Homer, 45; 
Mecosta, 322. 

— Thomas J., b. 1820? set. N. Y., Mich., 
la. Clinton Past., 215. 



Walter, b. Brookfield, 1790? set. Vt.> 

1820? N. Y. Saginaw Port., 765. 

Warren, b. Madison Co.? 1816; set. 

Mich., 1833. Washtenaw Hist., 621. 

Hamlin, Hannah, m. 1S25? Orrin Wilcox 
of N. Y. and Mich. Genesee Port., 457. 

Hammatt, Abigail D. of Nantucket; m. 
1832? Gilbert Hatheway of Mass. and 
Mich. Grand Rapids' Lowell, 648; 
Macomb Hist., 908. 

Hammond, George H., b. Fitchburg, 1838; 

set. Mich., 1854. Detroit, 1153; Wayne 

Land.., Appendix, 126. 
Hand, Edward, set. Mich., 1845? Lenawee 

Port., 1025. 

James H., set. N. Y., O., 1835? Mich., 

1844. Branch Port., 398. 

Handy, Caleb, set. N. Y., 1815? d. 1824. 

Washtenaw Port., 334. 
Harding, George D., b. Boston, 1848; set. 

N. Y., Mich., 1870. Hillsdale Port., 322. 

Harkness, Hannah, m. 1812? Richard B. 
Sergeant of N. Y. Clinton Port., 752. 

Harlow, Amos R., b. Shrewsbury, 1815; 
set Mich., 1849; Houghton, 162. North- 
ern P., 5. 

Harmon, Henry, set. N. Y., Mich., 1866. 
Kalamazoo Port., 943 

• Polly, b. 1800, m. Almon Hart of 

Mich. Hillsdale Port., 572. 

. Sarah m. 1860? Martin T. Ryan of 

Mass. and Mich. Grand Rapids City, 
372. 

Harper, Caroline Guilford, b. North- 
ampton, 1816; set. Mich., 1835. Cass 
Twent., 66. 

Harriman, Lucinda, of Lawrence; m. Wm. 
E. Syms. Berrien Port., 661. 

Harrington, Ebenezer, set. N. Y., 1825? 
Kalamazoo Port., 426. 

Eli F., b. E. Bradfield? 1839; set. 

Mich., 1858. Grand Rapids Lowell, 
267; Kent, 421. 



Jeremiah, b. Greenfield, 1774; set. 

Mich., lSliO. St. Clair, 031. 

Mary E., b. Worcester, 1845; m. 

Morris Holcomb of Mich. Kent, 1033. 

Harris, Betsev, b. 1798; m. 01i%'er C. 
Roberts of Penn. Mecosta, 416. 

Celestia L., b. Heath; m. 1S58, Wm. 

F. Coles of N. Y. and Mich. Osceola, 
255. 

Joseph, set. Mich., 1850? Wash- 
tenaw Port., 355. 

Harrison, A., b. Williamstown, 1802; set. 

Mich., 1825. St. Clair, 121. 
Chloe, b. Williamstown, 1786; m. 

1814, Benj. Barrett of Mass. and Vt. 

Lenawee Hist. I, 176. 

John, of Berkshire Co.; set. Mich., 

1840? Gratiot, 327. 

Lois, b. N. Adams; m. 1812, Herrick 

Willey of N. Y. Lenawee Illus., 444. 

Maria L., b. Westfield, 1S35' m. 

Henry R. Lovell of N. Y. and Mich. 
Genesee Port., 694. 

Hart, Almon, b. 1797; set. Mich. Hills- 
dale Port., 572. 

George, b. Lvnnfield; set. Vt., O., 

1834; d. 1S57. Hillsdale Port., 533. 

Stephen, set. O. 1835? Newaygo, 

279. 

Hartsell, Mary A., m 1825? Henry 
Gilmore of Canada. Mecosta, 238. 

Hartwell, Betsey, m. 1S00? Joseoh Luce 
of Mass. and N. Y. Lenawee Hist. II, 
233. 

Harvey, Charlotte, m. 1850' Elezer C. 
Knapp of Mich. Allegan Twent., 413. 

Harwood, Ahaz, b. 1791; set. Vt., 1815? 
Mich., 1839. Macomb Hist., 855. 

Alanson, set. N. Y., Mich., 1838. 

Ingham Hist., 478. 

Harriet, b. Enfield, 1796; m. 1816, 

Jonah Gross of Mass. and Mich. Oak- 
land Hist., 83. 

. William W., b. Berkshire Co., 1785; 

set. N. Y., 1789; Mich., 1824. Wash- 
tenaw Hist., 1264. 

Haskins, Hiram, b. Taunton, 1818; set. 
Mich. Jackson Hist., 641. 

John, b. Taunton? 1785; set. Mich., 

1834. Lenawee Hist. II, 217- 



MICHIGAN PIONEERS 



149 



Lydia, b. Taunton, 1793; m. 1811, 

Sylvesier Boodry of Mass. and Mich. 
Lenawee Hist. II, 330. 

Samuel, Sr., set. Vt.; d. 1776? 

Jackson Port., S36. 

William, of Taunton; set. Mich., 

1834. Lenawee Hist. II, 217. 
Hastings, Henrv, b. 1818; set. Wis., 1850? 

Mich. Upper P., 504. 
Hatch, Frederick R., b. Blandford, 1803; 

set. Mich., 1832. Homer, 36, 46. 

William, b. 1759; set. Nova Scotia. 

Lenawee Hist. I, 104. 

Hathaway, Adeline M., b. 1803; m. 1836, 
Kelly S. Beals of Mich. Lenawee Port., 
214. 

Bathsheba, b. New Bedford, m. 1830? 

Vernon French of Mass. and Mich., 
Jackson Hist., 795; Jackson Port., 299. 

Daniel, b. 1792? set. O. Gratiot, 278. 

Elizabeth, m. 1835? Thomas J. Hoxie 

of N. Y. and O. Gratiot, 658. 



Elizabeth, m. 1842, Richard De 

Greene of Mich. Lenawee Port., 657. 

Hiron, b. 1799; set. N. Y., 1820? 

Macomb Hist., 5S8. 

James, of Berkshire Co., set. Mich., 

1834. Lenawee Hist. II, 242; Lenawee 
Port., 657. 

Jeptha, set. Mich., 1806. Lenawee 

Port., 214. 

Prudence, m. 1800? Jeremiah Coop- 
er of Mass. and N. Y. Lenawee Illus., 
90. 

Tryphena, b. Heath; m. 1810? Elias 

Upton of Mass. and Mich. Clinton 
Past., 421; Clinton Port., 869. 

Z., b. 1802; set. O., 1825. Berrien 

Hist., 253. 

Hatheway, Gilbert, b. Plymouth Co., 
1812; set. Mich., 1846. Grand Rapids 
Lowell, 648; Macomb Hist., 908. 

James, S. P., b. Marion, 1834; set., 

Mich., 1853. Macomb Hist., 908. 

Rufus C, b. Rochester; set. Mich., 

1850? Grand Rapids Lowell, 648. 

Hawes, Jason A., set. Wis., 1850? North- 
ern P., 208. 

Hawkixs, Abiel, b. Williamstown, 1797; 
set. Vt., N. Y., Mich., 1818. Washtenaw 
Hist., 1208. 



Hawks, Aaron, set. Mich., 1837. Lenawee 
Port., 255. 

Anna, of Shelburne, b. 1774 or 1775; 

m. 1795? Rufus Smead of X. Y., and 
Mich. Lenawee Hist. I, 337; Lenawee 
Illus., 124. 

Emeline, of Franklin; m. 1839, 

Henry B. Childs of Mass. and Mich. 
Grand Rapids City, 604. 

John A., b. Franklin Co., 1809; set. 

Mich., 1833. Lenawee Port., 255. 
Hayden, Jonathan, set. N. Y. Branch 

Port., 595. 

Lavina, b. near Boston, 1790; m. 

Arnold Spencer of N. Y. Macomb 
Hist., 661. 

. Polly, b. Northampton; m. John 

Brown of N. Y. and O., an 1812 soldier. 

Branch Port , 598. 
Haynes, George A., b. Princeton 1858; set. 

Mich., 1881. Homer, 128. 
Josiah, b. Franklin Co., 1808; set. 

Mich., 1834. Hillsdale Port., 793. 

Mary, of Newbury, m. 1706, John 

Preston of Ct. Macomb Hist., 709. 

Hays, Willard, set. Mich., 1836. Allegan 

Hist., 367. 
Hay ward, David, 1812 soldier, set. N. Y. t 

Northern P., 409. 

Henry, b. Cummington. 1787; set. 

N. Y., 1810? Mich., 1833. Lenawee 
Hist. II, 149; Lenawee Port., 913, 998. 

Ormand, b. near Boston, 1799? set. 

Vt., N. Y., Mich. Muskegon Port., 335, 
395. 



Stephen, b. near Boston, 1" 



Revolutionary soldier, set. N. Y., 17S5? 
Muskegon Port., 335. 

Theodore, set. N. Y., 1810? Mich., 

1834. Lenawee Hist. I, 428. 

Hazard, James, b. Russell, 1796; set. 

Mich , 1820? Macomb Hist., 824. ' 
Hazleton, Charlotte, m. 1830' Levi 

Forbes of Canada. Isabella, 503. 

Hazzard, James, b. 1769; set. N. Y., 
1800? St. Joseph, 107. 

William, b. Berkshire, 1798; set. 

N. Y., Vt., 1811, N. Y., Mich., 1817. 
St. Joseph, 107. 

Head, Smith, set. O., Mich., 1855. Clinton 
Port., 632. 



150 



THE MASSACHUSETTS MAGAZINE 



Healy, Joshua, set. Vt., 1790? and NY. 
Kalamazoo Port., 863. 

Nelson K., set., Mich., 1838. Allegan 

Hist., 186. 

Heath, James, b. Berkshire Co., 1793; set. 

N. Y., O., 1835 and Mich. Clinton 

Port., 905. 
Hebard, Charles A., b. Franklin Co., 1805; 

set. N. Y., Mich., 1S39. Kent, 1396. 

Ezra A., b. Leyden, 1830; set. N. Y. 

and Mich., 1839. Kent, 1396; Grand 
Rapids Hist., 224; Grand Rapids Lowell, 
706. 

Hemenway, Thomas, b. near Boston; set. 
N. Y., 1785. Lenawee Port., 438. 

Hemingway, Harriet N., of Prescott; m. 
1854, Wm. P. Watterman of Mich. 
Jackson Hist., 818. 

Heniman, Polly, m. 1850? Edwin Gidley 
of Mich. Clinton Port., 580. 

Herbert, William H., b. Northfield, 1844; 
set. Ind., 1855; Mich. Northern M., 507. 

Herrick, Eliza A., b. Hampshire, 1829; m. 
Justice C. Perry of Mich. Midland, 178. 

Eunice, b. Pittsfield, 1821; m. Darius 

Rockwell of Penn. Midland, 197, 264. 

Priscilla, m. 1810? Nahum Ward of 

Mass. and 1830? Israel Bissel of O. 
Hillsdale Port., 357. 

Hersey, Daniel T., b. Northampton; set. 
O., 1835? Kalamazoo Port., 626. 

John, b. Cummington; set. N. Y., 

Mich., 1818. Oakland Hist., 139. 

Susannah,, b. 1783, m. Achish Pool 

of Mass. and N. Y. Macomb Hist., 758. 

Hewes, George W., b. Lvnnfield, 1822; 

set. Mich., 1865. Kent, 1029. 
Hewitt, Mary, m. 1828. Henry Arnold of 

O. and Mich. Cass Twent., 614. 

Hibbard, Charles A., set. Mich., 1836. 
Grand Rapids City, 36. 

Tohn, b. N. Hadley, 1827; set. Wis., 

1837; Mich., 1850. St. Clair, 317. 

Hickox, Erastus, set N. Y., 1820? Jack- 
son Port., 401: 

Hicks, Amos, b. 1776; set. N. Y., Mich., 
1825. Ingham Port., 611; Washtenaw 
Hist., 876. 

Benjamin, b. 1771? set. N.Y., Mich., 

1835. Oakland Port., 362. 



Betsev, m. 1S00? James Case of 

N. Y. Oakland Port., 347. 
Celia, of Taunton; m. 1819, David 

Willard of N. Y. Ionia Port., 695. 
Ephraim, b. Dighton, 1793; set. N.Y, 

1795, 1812 soldier; Mich., 1835. Lenawee 

Hist. I, 158; Lenawee Illus., 321. 
Jabez. set. N. Y., 1795. Lenawee 

Hist. I, 158. 

Otis, b. Attleboro, 1770? set. N. Y., 

1800? Macomb Hist., 797. 

Pele?, set. N. Y., 1812? Lenawee 

Port., 527. 

Hicok. Arnold, of Berkshire Co., set. N.Y., 
1820? Genesee Port , 744. 

William T., b. 1814; set. N. Y. 

Genesee Port., 744. 

Higbee, Loring, set. N. Y., 1796; d. 1862. 

Mecosta, 267. 
Hilborn, Henry E., b. 1829; set. Mich., 

1866. Detroit 1436. 
Hill, A^a, b. Adams, 1794; set. N. Y., 

1815? Mich., 1841. Lenawee Hist. II, 

317, 375. 

Calvin R., set. N. Y. and Mich., 

1835. Kent, 658. 

Comstock F., b. 1835; set. Mich., 

1837. Washtenaw Hist., 1285. 

Darius G., set. N. Y., 1805> Mich., 

1838. Genesee Port., 251; Oakland 
Port., 931. 

Elijah, b. 1775; set. N. Y., 1804. 

Oakland Port., 429. 

Elizabeth, of Franklin Co., m. 

1810? John Fisher of Mass. and Mich. 
Lenawee Port., 505. 

Etta A., b. 1859; m. Charles E. 

Warner of Mich. Mecosta, 356. 

Fitch, set. Mich. 1837. Washtenaw 

Hist., 1285. 

— — Hannah B., of Shutesbury; m. 1831, 
N. H. Hemingwav of Mass. and Mich. 
Jackson Hist., 818. 

John F.. b. Worcester Co., 1838: set. 

N. Y., 1852; Mich., 1851. Saginaw 
Hist., 899. 

Hilton, Emma of Boston; m. 1869, Row- 
land Connor of Mich. Saginaw Port., 
619. 

Sallie, daughter of Gov. Hilton of 

Mass. m. Samuel G. Langley. Berrien 
Port., 837. 



MICHIGAN PIONEERS 



151 



Himes, Joshua V., of Boston, set. Mich., 
1864? Berrien Hist., 140. 

Hinkley, Ann, m. 1825? Zimri Sanderson 
of Mich. Washtenaw Port., GOS. 

Henry, b Lee, 1S08; set. N. Y. 

Berrien Port., 909. 

Samuel, b near Barre, 1803; set. 

N. Y., 1830, Mich., 1S34. Lenawee 
Hist. I, 266; Lenawee Port., 487. 

Sarah S., b. Barre, 1828; m. Moses 

Carpenter of Mich. Lenawee Hist. I, 
266. 

Sophia J., b. Barre, 1830; m. Harmon 

G. Munger of Mich. Lenawee Hist. I, 
266. 

Hinman, Henry, b. Stockbridge; set. N. Y., 
1810? Kent, 1262. 

Hiscock, James, b. 1788; set. Penn., 1815? 

Mich., 1829. Washtenaw Hist., 1004; 

Washtenaw Past., 481; Washtenaw 

Port., 265. 
Hitchcock, Mamie; m. 1816? Daniel Perry 

of N. Y. and Mich. Jackson Hist., 835. 

Manley, 1812 soldier, set. N. Y., 

1815 r Jackson Port., 757. 

Otis, b. 1795; set. N. Y., 1815? Ionia 

Port., 360. 

Hoadley, Jacob, b. 1779; set. N. Y., 1820? 
Mich., 1836. Lenawee Hist. II, 94. 

Hobart, Israel, set. Mich., 1837; d. 1840. 
Jackson Hist., 627. 

John, b. Townsend, 1782; set. N. Y., 

1800? Jackson Hist., 859; Jackson 
Port., 604. 

William, b. Groton, 1751; set. N. Y. 

Jackson Port.., 604. 

Hodge, Emily, m. 1810? Sebina Tryon of 

N. Y. Clinton Port., 700. 
Milton H., b. Adams, 1825; set. 

Mich. 1836 or 1837. Jackson Hist., 

1027; Jackson Port., 697. 

Warner I., b. Adams, 1794; set. 

Mich., 1836; d. 1851. Jackson Hist., 
831, 1027; Jackson Port., 696. 

Holbrook, Bevajah, of Berkshire Co., set. 
N. Y., 1820? Detroit, 1121. 

Thestor T., b. 1792; set. N. Y. and 

Mich. Hillsdale Port., 634. 

Holcomb, Horace, b. 1790; set. Mich. 
Washtenaw Hist., 591. 



Holden, Amasa or Amadon, b. North- 
fied, 1795; set. Mich., 184 1. Ingham 
Hist., 307; Lansing, 454. 

M., b. Somerset, 183-; set Mo. 



1859, Mich. 1S64. Muskegon Hist., 103. 

Holloway, Butler, b. Conway, 1814; set. 
N. Y., 1816, Mich., 1833. Lenawee 
Hist. I, 291; Lenawee Port., 509. 

Sarah, b. 1823 ; m. Garrett Rockwood 

of N. Y. and O. Genesee Port., 6J5. 

Silas, b. Ashfield, 1812; set. X. Y., 

1817, Mich., 1S32. Lenawee Hist. II, 
475. 

William, b. 1781; set. X. Y., 1816 



or 1817, Mich., 1S33. Lenawee Hist. I, 
291; Lenawee Hist. II, 475; Lenawee 
Port., 509. . 

Holman, , b. Boston; set. Roxbury, 

N. H.. 1790. Macomb Hist., 701. 

Holmes, , b Boston, 1776; set. Can- 
ada; d. Buffalo, X. Y., 1836. Wayne 
Chron., 375. 

Benjamin T., b. 1760; set. N. Y. 

Lenawee Port., 204. 

Charles, D., b. W. Bovlston, 1814; 

set. Mich., 1831 or 1833. Calhoun, 110; 
Kent, 1040; St. Clair, 123. 

D. C, b. Berkshire Co., 1836; set. 

Mich., 1848. Jackson Hist., 1027. 

Evelyn, b. Adams, 1830? m. 1st. 

Rathbun, m. 2d. 1878, M. H. Hodge of 
Mich. Jackson Port., 698. 

Jeremiah, b. 1806; set. Vt., 1816; 

Mich., 1835. Lenawee Hist. II, 360. 

John C, b. Salem, 1809 or 1819; set. 

Mich., 1835. St. Clair, 119; Wayne 
Chron., 304. 

Milton, set, N. Y., 1830? Jackson 

Port., 698. 

Thomas, b. W. Boylston, 1815? set. 

Mich. Calhoun, 110. 

Holt, Clara M., m. 18S6, Dwight C. Clapp 
of Mich. Clinton Port., 617. 

XicholasM., b. Berkshire Co., 1801; 

set. Vt., 1820, N. Y., 1839, O., 1854. 
Saginaw Port., 750. 

Homes, William, b. Berkshire Co., set. 

N. Y., 1830? Mich., 1853. Newaygo, 

458. 
Hooley, Ann, m. 1840? Averill Burnett 

of Mich. Jackson Port., 300. 



152 



THE MASSACHUSETTS MAGAZINE 



Hopkins, Levi, b. Gt. Barrington, 1750; 
set. Va., 1795. Lenawee Port., 912. 

Mark, set. N. Y., 1S06, Mich., 1824. 

St. Clair, 676. 

Pitt, set. N. Y., 1790? Oakland 

Hist., 150. 

Samuel, Presbyterian clergyman, of 

Great Barrington, grandfather of Darius 
Hopkins of Pa. Kalamazoo Port., 589. 

Samuel F., b. Berkshire Co., 1803; 

set. N. Y., 1800; Mich., 1824. St. Clair. 
676. 

Hoppin, Thaddeus C, set. N. Y., 1820; 
Mich., 1844; d. 1859. Berrien Port., 
783; Berrien Twent., 338. 

Horton, Edward S., b. Warwick, 1844; 
set. Mich., 1856. Wayne Land., appen- 
dix, 224. 

Hosford, Franklin H., set. O. 1840? 

Kent, 1220. 1 
Hosmer, Artemus, b. Concord. 1788; set. 

Mich., 1818. Wayne Chron., 118. 

Rufus, b. Stowe, 1819; set. Mich., 

1838. Ingham Hist., 112; Oakland 

Hist., 46. 
Hough, Samuel, set. Conn.; N. Y., 1800? 

Branch Port., 455. 
Hovey, Horace, set. O., 1815? Mich., 1842. 

Clinton Port., 480. 

William, b. Concord, 1812; set- 
Mich., 1856. Kent, 1045. 

Howard, Alfonzo, set. N. Y., 1840? 
Saginaw Hist., 652. 

Daniel, b. Bridgewater; set. Vt., 

1810? Wayne Chron., 346. 

Edgar, b. Bristol Co., 1822; set. Mich., 

1836 or 1838. Detroit, 1393; Kent, 
1045; Wayne Chron., 66. 

Hepzibah P.. b. Easton, 1817; m. 

1838, Joseph H. Manning of Mich. 
Washtenaw Port., 48*. 

Howe, Aaron, b. N. Y., 1820? set. Mich. 
Lenawee Hist. II, 440. 

Daniel, set. N. Y., 1810? Genesee 



Port., 758. 

— Frederick A , set. N. Y. ; Mich., 1834 
or 1835. Berrien Hist., 228; Berrien 
Twent., 431. 483, 

— Hollis, b. Marlboro, 1801; set. N. Y., 
1820? Mich., 1837. Lenawee Hist. II, 
440. 



Irena, m. 1825? Solomon Gage 

N. Y. Washtenaw Hist., 852. of 
Priscilla of Andover; m Thomas 

Bliss of N. Y. and Mich. Kalamazoo 

Port., "09. 
Howes, Ezra, b. E. Dennis. 17S7; set. 

N. Y., Mich., 1830. Lenawee Hist. II, 

151. 

John. b. E. Dennis, 1797; set.V Y., 

Mich., 1847. Lenawee Hist. II, 152 

Howland, Amy of Westport; m. 1856 
Chas. H. Richmond of Mich. Wash- 
tenaw Hist., 10 \5 

Gilbert, S2t. N. Y., 1800. Hillsdale 

Port., 343. 

John. b. Greenfield, 1797 or 1798, 

set. N. Y., 1822, Mich., 1843. Wash- 
tenaw Hist., 593, 1211. 

Jonathan, b. Adams, 1789; set. X. Y., 

1800 or 1810, Mich., 1846, d. 1871. 
Hillsdale Hist., 294; Hillsdale Port., 513; 
Lenawee Hist. I, 426; Lenawee Hist. II, 
214; Lenawee Port., 958. 

Mary E. m. 1860? Addison P. 

Halladay of Mich. Lenawee Port., 456 

Samuel, b. Middlebury, 1S11; set. 

Mich , 1836. Kent, 261. 

Hoxsie, Content, b. 1771; m. John W. 
Keiley of Mass., Me., and Mich. Lena- 
wee Port., 1216. 

John, set. N. Y., 1780? Lenawee 

Port., 1217. 

Lvdia, b. X. Adams. 1790; m. Tason 



B. Wolcott of N. Y., O. and Mich. Hills- 
dale Port., 942. 

Hoyt, Calvin, set. N. Y., and Mich., 1841. 
Gratiot, 397. 

Frances M., m 1825? Samuel Stevens 

of N. Y. Muskegon Port. 316. 

Nancy, b. New Braintree, 17S0; m, 



1810? Samuel Ewell of X. Y. and Mich. 
Macomb Hist., 655; Macomb Past., 27. 

Hubbard, Edwin F., b. 1812; set. Mich., 
1850. Lenawee Illus., 337. 

Electa, b. Goshen; m. 1840? Daniel 

W. Reed of Mass. and X. Y. Allegan 
Twent., 116. 

Elizabeth W., of Northampton; m. 

1840, Wm. L. Greenly of Mich. Lena- 
wee Hist. I, 101. 

Francis E., b. S. Hadley, 1815; set. 



N. Y. Genesee Port., 758. 



COLONEL THOMAS GARDNER'S 

REGIMENT 



Colonel Thomas Gardner's Regiment, Lexington Alarm, April 19, 1TT. : 
Late Colonel Thomas Gardner's 37th Regiment, armt of U. C, 1775. 



By Frank A. Gardner, M.D. 



This regiment, composed very largely of men from Boston and the neigh- 
DDring towns, was evidently formed as early as December, 1774. Its com- 
mander was called "Colonel" Gardner in the records of the First Provincial 
Congress, December 9, 1774, and two field pieces were assigned by the Com- 
mittee of Safety to the regiment for its use, February 23, 1775. 

April 19, 1775, the regiment responded to the Lexington alarm call with 
the following officers : 

"Colonel Thomas Gardner 
Lieut. Colonel William Bond 
First Major Abijah Brown 
Second Major Benjamin Hammon 
First Adjutant Abner Crafts 
Second Adjutant Nathan Fuller 



Captains 
Samuel Barnard 
Samuel Thatcher 
Isaac Hall 
Abraham Pierce 

Benjamin Blaney 



First Lieutenants 
John Stratton 
John Walton 
Caleb Brooks 
Samuel Starns 

Nathan Lyndes 



Second Lieutenants 
Phinehas Stearns 
Jotham Walton 
Ens. Stephen Hall -1th 

John Clark 
Ens. Isaac Hagar 
William Wait" 
"Cambridge, 4 May. (1775) 



Sr. 

It is the Defire of the Committee of Safety that you march one half of 

your Company forthwith to Cambridge to parade before the Church meeting 

house, and to persue such orders as you Shall Receive from the General from 

time to time. 

Tho Gardner Col. 



154 THE MASSACHUSETTS MAGAZINE 

To Captain John Parker." 

The above company of Captain Parker did not regularly belong to this 
regiment but was a Lexington Company detached for special service at Cam- 
bridge. 

When the Provincial Army was organized in May, 1775, Colonel Gard- 
ner's Regiment became the Fifteenth. The field officers commissioned June 
2, 1775, were as follows: 

Colonel Thomas Gardner 
Lieut. Colonel William Bond 
Major Michael Jackson 

On the 17th of June, 1775, after the British landed at Charlestown, this 
regiment was stationed on the road to Lechmere's Point and late in the day 
was ordered to Charlestown. When it arrived at Bunker Hill, General Put- 
man ordered a part of it to remain there and assist in throwing up the de- 
fences commenced at that place. One company went forward and fought at 
the rail fence, but the greater part of the regiment under Colonel Gardner 
advanced toward the redoubt on Breed's Hill on the third attack of the 
British. While engaged in this forward movement, Colonel Gardner was 
struck by a ball and mortally wounded. Major Jackson then led the men 
forward and with Cushing's, Smith's, and Washburn's companies of Ward's 
Regiment and Adjutant Febinger's detachment of Colonel Gerrish's Regiment 
"poured between Breed's and Bunker Hill a well directed fire upon the enemy 
and gallantly covered 'the retreat." 

Colonel Gardner was borne on a litter of rails over Winter Hill and as the 
retreating troops passed him he endeavored to encourage them by words of 
cheer. He lingered until July 3d when he died and was buried with military 
honors two days later. Seven members of the regiment were wounded in 
.this battle of June 17th. 

The following list of line officers of this regiment is found in Colonel Hen- 
shaw's Orderly Book, Mass. Hist. Soc. Proceedings XV, p. SO. 

Captains 1st Lieutenants 2nd Lieutenants 

Thomas Drury William Maynard Joseph Mixer 

Phineas Cook Josiah Warren Aaron Richardson 

Nathan Fuller Nathan Smith John George 

Isaac Hall Caleb Brooks Samuel Cutler 

Josiah Harris Bartholow Trow Thomas Miller 

Abner Craft John Child 



COLONEL THOMAS GARDNER'S REGIMENT 155 

Abijah Child Joshua Swan Jedediah Thayer 

Benjamin Lock Solomon Bowman Stephen Frost - 

Moses Draper Ebenezer Brattle 
Nailer Hatch 

The companies were made up largely from the following towns: 
Captains: 

Nailer Hatch, Maiden, etc. 

Benjamin Locke, Cambridge, Charlestown, Boston, etc. 
Isaac Hall, Charlestown, Medford and Stoneham. 
Abijah Childs, Waltham, Weston, etc. 
Benjamin Browne, Damariscotta, Broad Bay, Salem, etc. 
Moses Draper, Guilford, Walpole, Roxbury, Wrentham, Milton, etc. 
Nathan Fuller, Newton, Waltham, Weston, Lincoln, etc. 
Abner Craft, Watertown, Cambridge, etc. 
Phineas Cook, Newton, Cambridge. 
Josiah Harris, Charlestown. 

The regiment was stationed in June and July in the fortifications on 
Prospect Hill, as shown in the following order of July 4, 1775: 

"Colonel Gardner is to be buried tomorrow at three o'clock p.m., with the 
military honours due to so brave and gallant an officer, who fought, bled 
and died in the cause of his Country and mankind. His own Regiment, ex- 
cept the Company at Maiden, to attend on this mournful occasion. The 
places of those Companies, in the lines on Prospect Hiil, to be supplied by 
Colonel Glover's Regiment till the funeral is over." 

The Provincial Congress in session July 5, 1775, appointed Dr Abraham 
Watson Surgeon, and Dr. William Vinal Surgeon's Mate of this regiment. 

When the Army of the United Colonies was organized in July, 1775, this 
regiment became the 37th. July 15, 1775, Captain Benjamin Brown, Lieu- 
tenant Josiah Warren, Lieutenant Bartholomew Trow and Lieutenant David 
Goodenough were appointed recruiting officers for the regiment. In the 
records of the Provincial Congress, July 28, 1775, we read the following: 

"43 small arms amounting as by appraisement to seventy-nine pounds, 
two shillings, and four pence, were delivered to Col. Gardner, for the use of 
his regiment, and a receipt taken for the same in the minute book from Lt. 
Col. Bond." 

The strength of the regiment month by month is shown in the following 
table: 



156 THE MASSACHUSETTS MAGAZINE 



Date. 


Com. Off. 


Staff 


Non. Corns. 


Rank and File. 


Total 


June 9 


31 




58 


446 


535 


July 


21 


4 


52 


417 


494 


Aug. 18 


21 


4 


33 


406 


464 


Sept. 23 


24 


4 


47 


430 


505 


Oct. 17 


21 


4 


48 


410 


483 


Nov. 18 


25 


4. 


43 


406 


478 


Dec. 30 


20 


4 


47 


405 


476 



The officers of the regiment attained rank as follows during the war: 

1 brigadier-general, 3 colonels, 3 lieutenant-colonels, 3 majors, 22 captains, 
1 capt. lieutenant, 22 1st lieutenants, 3 2nd lieutenants, 3 ensigns, 1 surgeon 
and 1 surgeon's mate. Making 32 out of a total of 63 who attained the rank 
of captain or higher. Twenty-one had either seen service in the French war 
or had held commissions before the Revolution, in the Militia. 

COLONEL THOMAS GARDNER of Brookline was the son of Richard 
and Elizabeth (Winchester) Gardner. He was born in Brookline, July 2-i, 
1724. June 27, 1765, he was commissioned an Ensign in the First Cam- 
bridge Company in Colonel William Brattle's Regiment, and in June, 1771, 
he became Captain-Lieutenant in the same company and regiment. He was 
a member of the Middlesex County Convention at Concord in August, 1774, 
and a member of the First Provincial Congress from Cambridge in October 
1774. He served on many important committees during this First Congress, 
such committees being appointed for the following purposes; to enquire into 
the state of the province; to request the Reverend Doctor Appleton to attend 
the congress as Chaplain; to inquire "into the present state and operation of 
the army"; "to consider what is necessary to be done for the defence and 
safety of the province"; "to take into consideration and determine what 
number of ordnance (and) what quantity of powder" should be provided; to 
consider "what exercise will be best for the people of the province at this 
time to adopt and report thereon"; "to wait on the Governor and request 
that warlike preparations desist" and to consider a plan of military exercise 
proposed by Colonel Timothy Pickering. 

He was also a member of the Second Provincial Congress and served on 
many committees, those of importance from a military standpoint being as 
follows: "to observe the motion of troops said to be on their road to this 
town"; "to confer with Gen. Ward relative to the proposal made by Col. 
Arnold of Connecticut, for an attempt upon Ticonderoga" ; and to " take into 
consideration an equal representation of this colony & report." He was chosen 
a member of the Committee of Safety, April 14, 1775. Five days later he 



COLONEL THOMAS GARDNER'S REGIMENT 157 

with his regiment, responded to the Lexington alarm. When the Provincial 
Army was organized in May, 1775, his regiment became the Fifteenth. He 
served as field officer of the day, May 23 and June 14, 1775. The account 
of the doings of this regiment on June 17, 1775, has already been given in 
the historical section of this article. After receiving his mortal wound in the 
heroic charge of his regiment, as he was being borne from the field he had 
an affecting interview with his nineteen year old son who was anxious to 
assist in bearing his father away. This the father forbade and as we have 
stated he was carried over Winter Hill on a litter of rails. Brave, even in 
his desperately wounded condition, he endeavored to cheer his retreating men 
as they overtook him. He died July 3d in his fifty-second year and, as 
stated above, was buried with the honors of war. Frothingham speaks of him 
as "a true patriot, a brave soldier and an upright man". The following 
obituary notice of him appeared in the " New England Chronicle & Essex 
Gazette", July 13, 1775: " From the Era of our public Difficulties he diftin- 
guished himfelf as an ardent Friend to the expiring Liberties of America; 
and by the unanimous Suffrages of his townfmen was for fome years elected 
a Member of the General Affembly ; but when the daring Encroachments of 
intending Defpotism deprived us of a conftitutional Convention, and the first 
law of nature demanded a subftitute he was chofen one of the Provincial 
Congrefs; in which Departments he was vigilant and indefatigable in defeat- 
ing every Effort of Tyranny. To promote the Interest of his Country was 
the Delight of his Soul. An inflexible Zeal for Freedom caused him to be- 
hold every Engine of Opprefiion with Contempt, Horror and Averfion. His 
Abilities in a military Capacity were equally conipicuous. That he might 
cultivate a Spirit of Emulation for that now neceii'ary and ufeful Science, he 
devoted not only a great Part of his Time, but even of his own Patrimony; 
and ever exhibited an Example of Courage and Magnanimity. In the humid 
Vale of private Life he was agreeable and entertaining. Juftice and Integrity 
were" the firft movements of his Actions. To his Family unreferved and 
fincere. To the whole Circle of his Acquaintance, affable, condefcending and 
obliging; while Veneration for Religion Augmented the Splendor of his Sister 
Virtues. As he ever maintained and avowed the higheft Sentiments of 
Patriotifm fo his Conduct entirely cohered, and, actuated by this Divine 
Principle, with intrepid Bravery entered the field of Battle. And although 
he returned uncrowned with victorious Bays, and his Temple unadorned with 
Laurel Wreaths; yet doubtless he will be crowned with unfading Honors in 
the unclouded Regions of eternal Day." The town of Gardner, Massachu- 
setts, was named in honor of him. 



158 THE MASSACHUSETTS MAGAZINE 

LIEUT. COLONEL WILLIAM BOND of Watertown, was the son of 
Jonas, Esq. and Hannah (Bright) Bond. He was born February 17, 1733-4. 
July 24, 1756, he "was in Colonel William Brattle's 1st Middlesex County 
Regiment in the expedition against Crown Point. In the following month 
he enlisted from the above regiment into Captain Timothy Houghton's Com- 
pany, Colonel Jonathan Bagley's Regiment at Fort William. From Novem- 
ber 3 to 30, 1759, he was a private in Captain Daniel Fletcher's Company; 
Colonel Frye's Regiment, and on December 1, 1759, was promoted to corporal 
and served to June 7, 1760. In June, 1771, he was Captain-Lieutenant in 
Captain Thomas Oliver's Company, Colonel William Brattle's 1st. Middlesex 
County Regiment. He was Lieutenant-Colonel of Colonel Thomas Gardner's 
Regiment on the Lexington alarm of April 19, 1775. June 2, 1775, he was 
commissioned to serve in the same rank in Colonel Gardner's Provincial Reg- 
iment, and after Colonel Gardner's death he commanded the regiment 
through the remainder of the year. He was called "Colonel" in a list of 
officers of the main and picket guards, July 3, 1775, and he is given the rank 
of Colonel in the "Historical Register of the Officers of the Continental Army" 
but he was not commissioned colonel during that year for the monthly returns 
from July on give the highest officer in the regiment as "Lieut, colonel" 
leaving the space under colonel, blank. The regiment is almost invariably 
called "Late Colonel Gardner's Regiment", in the records for 1775. In January 
and February, 1776, Colonel Bond returned twenty-five small arms wmich had 
been used by the officers of his regiment during the previous year. January 
1, 1776, he became Colonel of the 25th Regiment of Infantry in the Conti- 
nental Army. He led his army to New York in March, 1776, arriving there 
on the 30th. April 20th his regiment with the Sth, 15th, and 24th, received 
orders to march to Canada, the first detachment to go by way of the lakes. 
While in Canada his men suffered severely from disease and with his force 
greatly weakened he returned and encamped on Mount Independence near 
Ticonderoga. He died there of putrid fever, August 31, 1776. The following 
is taken from a letter written from camp and published in " The Boston 
Gazette," September 23, 1776. "On the 31st ult. departed this life, Colonel 
William Bond. He met the last enemy with the greatest calmness and intre- 
pidity. In his death our country has lost a true patriot, and a most vigilant 
officer of tried bravery. The first of this instant his remains were escorted 
with military parade to the place of burial in front of the Regiment where 
the Rev. Ebenezer David delivered a funeral oration and prayer. After 
which the corpse was interred and the Colonel's character honored by a dis- 



COLONEL THOMAS GARDNER'S REGIMENT 159 

charge of three 24 pounders, and the usual volley of musketry. The whole 
was conducted in a manner suitable to the occasion." 

FIRST MAJOR ABIJAH BROWN of Waltham, held the above rank in 
Colonel Thomas Gardner's Regiment on the Lexington alarm, April 19, 
1775. In June he became Lieutenant-Colonel of Colonel B. Ruggles Wood- 
bridge's Regiment. A full account of his service in the French and Indian 
War and in the Revolution has been given in the Massachusetts Magazine, 
v. IV, pp. 35-6. 

MAJOR MICHAEL JACKSON of Newton was born in that town De- 
cember IS, 1734. In September, 1755, he was a member of "Captain Fullar's 
Company of Newtown", in Colonel William Brattle's Regiment. In the fol- 
lowing year he served as Lieutenant in Colonel Richard Gridley's Company 
at Crown Point, his service dating from February IS to December 5. From 
April 18 to December 13, 1761, he was Lieutenant in Captain John Dunlap's 
Company. From the last named date to December 15, 1762, he held the 
same rank in Captain Johnson Moulton's Company. May 17, 1763, he ren- 
dered an account for making up payroll and sundries found for the sick at 
York. The statement is made in Heitman's "Historical Register of the Offi- 
cers of the Continental Army", that he was Captain of a company of Minute 
Men on the Lexington alarm, and Drake, in the "Memorials of the Massa- 
chusetts Society of the Cincinnati", states that he enlisted as a private and 
that on the morning of the 19th of April, when the company assembled, no 
commissioned officers were present. Continuing, Drake narrates that: 
"Jackson was chosen captain for the day; and, without stopping to return 
thanks for the honor, or the slightest formality, he ordered the company to 
shoulder arms — platoons to the right wheel — quick time — forward march. On 
arriving at Watertown, the rendezvous of the regiment, where the officers 
were holding a council, he soon got the floor, and made a moving speech. 
He told them that there was a time for all things, but that the time for talk- 
ing had passed, and the time for fighting had come. He accused the officers 
of wasting time through fear of meeting the enemy; and told them that if 
they meant to oppose the march of the British troops to forthwith take up 
their march for Lexington. He intended that his company should ' take the 
shortest route to get a shot at the British', and, suiting the action to the 
word, left the council, which, after his blunt speech, broke up without any 
concert of action. His company came into contact with Earl Percy's reserve 
near Concord Village, and was dispersed after exchanging a few shots; but 
soon rallied, hanging upon the flank and rear of the retreating enemy with 



160 THE MASSACHUSETTS MAGAZINE 

much effect, until they reached Charlestown at nightfall. This company 
received the thanks of Dr. Joseph Warren for its bravery." Drake has given 
us in the above quotation, a very interesting story, but the very complete files 
and returns of Minute Men's service in the archives, fails to confirm the 
statements made, and do not show that any Michael Jackson led a company on 
the Lexington Alarm. Credit for any service on the 19th of April, 1775, is 
not given to Michael Jackson, Senior, but "Michael Jackson, Junior", was 
in "Capt. Phineas Cook's co., which marched on the alarm of April 19, 1775, 
to headquarters at Cambridge under command of Capt. Lieut. John Marean." 
The first service in the Revolution credited to the subject of this sketch, in the 
archives, is found in an order for the day dated Cambridge, May 26, 1775, when 
as Major he was called field officer of the picket "to night." His commission 
as Major was ordered by the Provincial Congress, June 2, 1775. The heroic 
conduct of Major Jackson in the Battle of Bunker Hill has already been nar- 
rated in the historical section of this article. In this engagement he had a 
personal encounter with a British officer, whom he killed, his own life being 
saved by his sw^ord belt. They recognized each other as fellow officers in the 
French war. He himself w r as wounded, but not seriously. He served in Col- 
onel Gardner's (Lieut. Colonel Bond's) Regiment through the year and during 
1776, was Lieut. Colonel of Paul Dudley Sargent's 16th Regiment, Continental 
Army. He was wounded at Montressor's Island, September 24, 1776. Janu- 
ary 1, 1777, he became Colonel of the Sth Regiment, Massachusetts Line, and 
during the six years following, succeeded in making this one of the most 
famous regiments in the American Army. June 12, 1783, he w^as transferred 
to the 3d Regiment, Massachusetts Line, and September 30th of that year 
was brevetted Brigadier General. He served until November 3d, following. 
A full account of his service in 1776-17S3 will be given in the records of the 
above named regiments. Drake tells us that "Dr. Eustis relates that once, 
while dining with Gen. Washington at West Point, the General, after the 
cloth w r as removed, beckoned Col. Jackson to a seat by his side, and 'unbent 
himself more w r ith him than I ever had seen him do' ". He died April 10, 
1801. He had five brothers and five sons in the army of the Revolution, 
according to Drake. 

SECOND MAJOR BENJAMIN HAMMOND (or HAMMON) served as 
Lieutenant in Captain Jonas Stone's (2nd Newton) Company, Colonel William 
Brattle's 1st Middlesex County Regiment, December 29, 1763. He acted as 
Captain of the above company in June, 1771, and was recommended for a 
commission in that rank, September 17, 1771. His name appears as Second 
Major of Colonel Thomas Gardner's Regiment, April 19, 1775; service for 8 



COLONEL THOMAS GARDNER'S REGIMENT 1G1 

days. February 7, 1776, he was commissioned Lieut. Colonel of Colonel 
Samuel Thatcher's 1st Middlesex County Regiment. He had one day's ser- 
vice in the same rank and regiment in 177S. 

FIRST ADJUTANT ABNER CRAFTS of Watertown, held that rank in 
Colonel Thomas Gardner's Regiment on the Lexington alarm of April 19, 

1775. June 2nd he was commissioned Captain in the same regiment and he 
commanded a company in it through the year. January 1, 1776, he became 
Captain in Colonel John Greaton's 24th Regiment, Continental Army. 

SECOND ADJUTANT NATHAN FULLER of Newton, served in that 
rank in Colonel Thomas Gardner's Regiment, April 19, 1775, and for six days 
following. He had seen service as private in Captain John Nixon's Company, 
from November 18, 1761, to November 22, 1762. His commission as Cap- 
tain in Colonel Gardner's Regiment in the Provincial Army was ordered June 
2, 1775. He continued to command a company in this regiment under 
Lieut. Colonel Bond, through the year. January 1, 1776, he became Captain 
of a company in Colonel William Bond's 25th Regiment, Continental Army. 
He became Lieut. Colonel of Colonel Edward Wigglesworth's 13th Regiment, 
Massachusetts Line, January 1, 1777, and served until June 28, 1777, when 
he resigned on account of ill health. 

SURGEON ABRAHAM WATSON (JR.?) was one of the surgeons in 
the approved list made up by a committee of the Congress at Watertown, 
July 5, 1775. The "Historical Register of the Officers of the Continental 
Army" gives his term of service in this regiment as June 2S-December, 1775. 

SURGEON'S MATE WILLIAM VINAL of Watertown, is credited in 
the "Historical Register of the Officers of the Continental Army", with ser- 
vice in that rank in this regiment from May to December, 1775. Through 
1776 he held the same rank in Colonel William Bond's 25th Regiment, Conti- 
nental Army. He is credited with service as Hospital Mate, in the Conti- 
nental Army pay accounts, from April 8, 1777, to December 3, 17S0. In a 
balance statement certified to February 4, 1784, he was reported "deceased". 

CAPTAIN SAMUEL BARNARD of Watertown, was the son of Samuel 
and Susannah (Harrington) Barnard. He was baptized June 19, 1737. In 
June, 1771, his name appears as Lieutenant in Captain Thomas Oliver's 
Watertown Company, Colonel William Brattle's 1st Middlesex County Regi- 
ment. Bond in his "History of Watertown," states that he was one of the 
"Boston Tea Boys." He was Captain of a company in Colonel Thomas 
Gardner's Regiment on the Lexington alarm, April 19, 1775. February 7, 

1776, he was commissioneed First Major in Colonel Samuel Thatcher's 1st 
Middlesex County Militia Regiment. He died August 8, 1782. 



162 THE MASSACHUSETTS MAGAZINE 

CAPTAIN BENJAMIN BLANEY of Maiden was the son of Captain 
Benjamin Blaney, a prominent inhabitant of Maiden who died in 1751. He 
was born July 24, 173S. His occupation was that of a tanner. He was 
Ensign in Captain Jabez Lynde's Company in Maiden, in September, 1765. 
In June, 1771, he was Captain of the Maiden Company in Colonel William 
Brattle's 1st Middlesex County Regiment. January 5, 1773, he was appointed 
on a committee of enquiry regarding the report "that Stipends are affixed 
to the offices of the judges of the superior Court of Judicature in this Prov- 
ince," December 13, 1773, he was appointed on a committee to draw up a 
report regarding the importation of tea. He was appointed a member of a 
standing committee of advice in Maiden, September 2, 1774. In reply to a 
request from the town, Captain Blaney and the other officers of the Maiden 
Foot Company sent the following: " That they are willing to exert themselves 
to the utmost in the service of the Town, & of this oppressed Land & are 
hereby willing to muster their company, and attend upon their service once 
a fortnight, until the latter end of December, & the remaining part of the 
Winter once a month if the Weather is such as it will do to muster in, pro- 
vided the Gentlemen in the Town will encourage said Officers & Company in 
their muster 

Benja Blany 
Nathan Lynde 
Novr 4, 1774. William Waitt." 

He was a member of the Maiden Committee of Inspection and Observa- 
tion, January, 1775. The town voted February 9, 1775: "To recommend to 
Capt. Blany, that he call his Company together once next week for military 
discipline, & twice a week afterwards till March meeting." He was to "ex- 
empt none under 60 except those exempted by law." He commanded his 
company of Maiden men on the Lexington alarm of April 19, 1775, said 
company marching as a part of Colonel Thomas Gardner's Regiment. He 
also commanded his company May 27, 1775, when they went to Noddle's, 
Hog and Snake Islands to remove the live stock. They were reinforced later 
by General Israel Putnam with 300 men. This engagement known as the 
battle of Noddle's Island, Hog Island or Chelsea resulted in the recovery of 
three or four hundred cattle, the burning of a house, barn, and schooner, the 
taking of twelve swivels and four small cannon from the enemy and a major- 
general's commission for General Putnam. See Massachusetts Magazine, v. 
I, pp. 163-4. His company and that of Captain Nailer Hatch were on 



-• 



COLONEL THOMAS GARDNER'S REGIMENT 163 

Beacham's Point, Maiden, during the battle of Bunker Hill, June 17, 1775. 
April 29, 1776, he was commissioned Captain in Colonel Samuel Thatcher's 
1st Middlesex County Regiment. In June, 1776, he commanded a company 
which marched to Point Shirley, and from January 12, 1778, to April 3, 1778, 
was in Colonel Eleazer Brook's Regiment of Guards at Cambridge. He was 
a Representative from Maiden at the State Constitutional Convention in 
1780. In 1S15 he sold his house near Water's Spring and removed to Ches- 
ter, Vermont, where he died January 29, 1S20. It was narrated of him that 
he was "prompt in duty and persevering in effort." 

CAPTAIN BENJAMIN BROWN appears in a list in the Archives as 
commander of a company of Damariscotta, Broad Bay and Salem men in this 
regiment. He was appointed one of the recruiting officers of the regiment 
July 15, 1775. We do not know the name of the town from which he came 
and the fact that the name is so common makes it impossible to tell whether 
any of the other services of men of this name belong to him. 

CAPTAIN ABIJAH CHILDS of Waltham was engaged April 25, 1775, 
to command a company in this regiment. His commission was ordered June 
2, 1775. He is described as being 5 feet, 8 inches tall. He served through 
the year and during 1776 was Captain in Colonel William Bond's 25th Regi- 
ment, Continental Army. January 1, 1777, he became a Captain in Colonel 
John Greaton's 3d Regiment, Massachusetts Line. He resigned March 10, 
1778. 

CAPTAIN PHINEAS COOK of Newton was Captain of a company 
which marched from Newton on the Lexington alarm of April 19, 1775, 
under command of Capt. Lieutenant Marean. His commission as Captain in 
Colonel Thomas Gardner's Regiment was ordered June 2, 1775. He served 
through the year. January 1, 1776, he became Captain in Colonel William 
Bond's 25th Regiment, Continental Army. 

CAPTAIN ABNER CRAFTS of Watertown, served as First Adjutant of 
this regiment and his record has been given in the list of staff officers in the 
earlier pages of this article. 

CAPTAIN MOSES DRAPER of Roxbury, was Second Lieutenant in 
Captain Moses Whiting's Company of Minute Men in Colonel John Greaton's 
Regiment on the Lexington alarm, April 19, 1775. His commission as Cap- 
tain in Colonel Thomas Gardner's Regiment was ordered June 2, 1775. He 



164 THE MASSACHUSETTS MAGAZINE 

served through the year. January 1, 1776, he became Captain of a Com- 
pany in Colonel William Bond's 25th Regiment, Continental Army. He 
probably did not serve through the year. 

CAPTAIN THOMAS DRURY was an Ensign in Captain Joseph Eames' 
2nd Framingham Company, Colonel John Noyes' 3d South Middlesex Regi- 
ment, August, 1771. His commission as Captain in Colonel Thomas Gard- 
ner's Regiment was ordered June 2, 1775. 

CAPTAIN NATHAN FULLER of Newton was Second Adjutant of Col- 
onel Thomas Gardner's Regiment on the Lexington alarm of April 19, 1775. 
Later he commanded a company in Colonel Gardner's Regiment. His full 
record has been given in the list of staff officers in the early pages of this 
article. 

CAPTAIN ISAAC HALL of Medford was the son of Andrew and Abigail 
(Walker) Hall. He was born January 24, 1739. In July 1771, he served as 
Lieutenant in Captain Ebenezer Hall's Medford Company, Colonel William 
Brattle's 1st Middlesex County Regiment and received his commission May 
28, 1773. He was Captain of a Company in Colonel Thomas Gardner's 
Regiment on the Lexington alarm of April 19, 1775. His commission was 
ordered June 2, 1775. He served through the year. A company com- 
manded by him marched from Medford by order of General Washington, at 
the time of the taking of Dorchester Heights, in March 1776. 

CAPTAIN JOSIAH HARRIS of Charlestown was the son of Josiah and 
Mellicent (Estabrook) Harris. He was born October 29 (baptized December 
6), 1747. His commission as Captain in Colonel Thomas Gardner's Regiment 
was ordered June 2, 1775. He served through the year and January 1, 1776, 
joined Colonel William Bond's 25th Regiment, Continental Army, as Cap- 
tain of one of the companies. He died September 5, 1811. 

CAPTAIN NAILER HATCH of Maiden, was a private in Captain 
Blaney's Company, Colonel Thomas Gardner's Regiment on the Lexington 
alarm, April 19, 1775. May 2, 1775, he was commissioned Captain in Colonel 
Gardner's Regiment. He served through the year. He was posted with his 
company on Beacham's Point in May and June 1775, and through the siege 
of Boston. January 1, 1776, he became Captain of a company, in Colonel 
William Bond's 25th Regiment, Continental Army. The author of the 
"History of Maiden", states that he w T as "a stout man, rather rash in temper, 
and fiery in zeal." He died in Maiden July 14, 1804, aged 73 years. He 



COLONEL THOMAS GARDNER'S REGIMENT 165 

was in all probability the officer of that name who was Second Lieutenant 
on the privateer sloop "Independence", commission ordered December 21, 
1777, and on the privateer brig "Lady Washington", January 15, 1783. 

CAPTAIN BENJAMIN LOCKE of Cambridge, son of Samuel Lock was 
baptized August 6, 173S. He was a private in Captain William Peirce's 
Company from April 10 to October 19, 1755, on the Crown Point Expedition. 
June 2, 1775, his commission was ordered as Captain in Colonel Thomas 
Gardner's Regiment. We know that he enlisted in the service in the month 
previous from the following description in a return dated October 6, 1775; "age 
37; stature 5 ft. 10 in; residence, Cambridge; enl. May — 1775." April 29, 
1776, he was commissioned Captain in Colonel Samuel Thatcher's 1st Middle- 
sex County Regiment of Militia. He was appointed on a committee June 
14, 1784, in Cambridge, to "enquire what lands belong to the Proprietors & 
what encroachments have been made & who are the Tenants." 

CAPTAIN ABRAHAM PEIRCE of Waltham, commanded a company 
in Colonel Thomas Gardner's Regiment, on the Lexington alarm, April 19, 
1775. In March 1776, he commanded a company in Colonel Samuel 
Thatcher's 1st Middlesex County Regiment, which marched at the request of 
General Washington to assist at the taking of Dorchester Heights. He was 
commissioned Captain in this regiment June 7, 1776. From January 12 to 
February 3, 1778 he was Captain in Colonel Eleazer Brook's Regiment of 
Guards at Cambridge. He was Captain of a Waltham Company in Colonel 
Samuel Thatcher's Regiment, called to Cambridge camp in expectation of the 
landing of the British at Boston, September 3-6, 1778. 

CAPTAIN SAMUEL THATCHER of Cambridge, was a Lieutenant in 
Captain William Brattle's 1st Cambridge Company, Colonel William Brattle's 
1st Middlesex County Regiment, June, 1771. As Samuel Thatcher, Jr., he 
had owned the covenant in the First Church in Cambridge, May 18, 1755.' 
He was Captain of a Company of Militia in Colonel Thomas Gardner's Regi- 
ment, w r hich marched on the Lexington alarm of April 19, 1775. February 
7. 1776, he was commissioned Colonel of the 1st Middlesex County Regiment 
of Militia. He served as late as September 30, 177S. He died June 27, 17S4, 
at Boston "in an extreme sudden manner aet 50." 

CAPTAIN EBENEZER BATTLE of Dedham, was the son of Jonathan 
and Elizabeth Battle. He was born January 7, 1727-8. April 16, 1766, he 
was commissioned Second Lieutenant in Lieut. Colonel Eliphalet Pond's 



166 THE MASSACHUSETTS MAGAZINE 

Dedham Company, Colonel Jeremiah Gridley's Regiment. September 19, 
1771, he was commissioned Ensign in Colonel Hezekiah Allen's Dedham 
Company, in Colonel Eliphalet Pond's Regiment. He commanded a company 
of 65 Minute Men of the 4th Parish of Dedham on the Lexington alarm of 
April 19, 1775. The roll of this company has been published in the Dedham 
Historical Register v. II, pp. 119-120. June 2, 1775, he was commissioned 
Lieutenant in Captain Moses Draper's Company, Colonel Thomas Gardner's 
Regiment. In March 1776, he served in Colonel Mcintosh's Regiment at 
Dorchester Heights. May 10, 1776, he was commissioned Captain of the Sth 
Company, in Colonel William Mcintosh's 1st Suffolk County Regiment. He 
was at Castle Island with this regiment in December of that year. From 
May S, to July 8, 1777, he was in Colonel Jonathan Titcomb's Regiment in 
service at Providence, Rhode Island. March 23, 177S, he again enlisted in 
Colonel Mcintosh's Regiment and July 2nd was commissioned Captain of the 
Sth Company. He was appointed 2nd Major of that regiment, April 1, 17S0. 
He died February 18, 1806. 

FIRST LIEUTENANT SOLOMON BOWMAN of Cambridge, held that 
rank in Captain Benjamin Locke's Company, receiving his commission June 
2, 1775. He was thirty-seven years old and 5 feet 9 inches in height. He 
served through the year. During 1776 he was First Lieutenant in Colonel 
William Bond's 25th Regiment, Continental Army. He died July 1, 1S23. 

FIRST LIEUTENANT CALEB BROOKS of Medford, was an Ensign in 
Captain Ebenezer Hall's Company, Colonel William Brattle's 1st Middlesex 
County Regiment, June 1771. He served as Lieutenant in Captain Isaac 
Hall's Company, Colonel Thomas Gardner's Regiment, on the Lexington 
alarm of April 19, 1775, and June 2, 1775, was commissioned Lieutenant 
tinder the same officers in the Provincial Army. He served through the year. 
In 1776 he was First Lieutenant in Colonel William Bond's 25th Regiment, 
Continental Army. June 18, 1776, he was commissioned Captain of the Sth 
(Medford) Company, Colonel Samuel Thatcher's 1st Middlesex County Regi- 
ment. He served in Colonel Nicholas Dike's Regiment for the defence of 
Boston, from August 22, 1776, to March 1, 1777, receiving his commission 
December 1, 1776. He also served in Colonel Brooks's Regiment of Guards, 
from November 3, 1777, to April 3, 1778. He died in Medford, February 7, 
1812, aged 67 years. 



COLONEL THOMAS GARDNER'S REGIMENT 1G7 

LIEUTENANT DAVID GOODENOUGH of Guilford may have been 
the man bearing that name who, as a resident of Marlboro, was a private in 
Captain John Taptin's Company, Colonel Jonathan Bayley's Regiment from 
March 3 to November 1G, 175S (endorsed); and a corporal in Captain John 
Clapham's Company from March 24 to December 2, 1700. He was mentioned 
as a recruiting officer for Colonel Gardner's Regiment, July 15, 1775. He 
was a Lieutenant in Captain Moses Draper's Company, in this regiment com- 
manded by Lieut. -Colonel William Bond, October 7, 1775. October 31, 1775, 
it was ordered that his commission be recommended to General Washington. 

FIRST LIEUTENANT NATHAN LYNDES or LYNDE of Maiden was 
a private in Captain Michael Brigden's Company, Colonel William Brattle's 
Regiment which marched from Cambridge to the relief of Fort William 
Henry, in August, 1757. He was a Lieutenant in Captain Benjamin Blaney's 
Company in Maiden, in 1774, and as such marched in Colonel Thomas 
Gardner's Regiment on the Lexington alarm, April 19, 1775. He marched 
with the company to Point Shirley by order of General Lincoln June 13, 
1776. March 4, 1776, he was appointed on a committee in Maiden to esti- 
mate the amount of damage done to the town by the Continental soldiers. 
He was called "commanding officer of the town", in 1778. 

FIRST LIEUTENANT WILLIAM MAYNARD of Framingham was 
probably the William Maynard (son or ward of Jonathan Maynard) who 
was a private in Captain Gray's Company of Sudbury from April 19 to No- 
vember 20, 1762. His commission as Lieutenant in Captain Thomas Drury's 
Company, Colonel Thomas Gardner's Regiment, was ordered June 2, 1775- 
He served as Lieutenant in Captain Thomas Drury's Company, Colonel John 
Nixon's 5th Regiment, Army of the United Colonies, in a muster roll dated 
August 1, 1775. (Engaged April 25, 1775.) August 1, 1777, he was com- 
missioned Lieutenant in a Company of Invalids stationed at Boston com- 
manded by Captain Moses McFarland in Colonel Louis Nichola's Regiment. 
Through the year 17S0 he was Second Lieutenant in the Corps of Invalids, 
Continental Army. Heitman in his "Historical Register of the officers of the 
Continental Army", states that his service in the Invalid Regiment extended 
from June 1, 1779, to June 1783, and that he^died in 1788. 

FIRST LIEUTENANT NATHAN SMITH of Weston, held that rank in 
Captain Nathan Fuller's Company, Colonel Thomas Gardner's Regiment. 
His commission was ordered June 2, 1775. From January 1, to August 1776, 
he held the same rank under the same Captain in Colonel William Bond's 



16S THE MASSACHUSETTS MAGAZINE 

25th Regiment, Continental Army. In that month he was promoted to 
Captain and served through the year. He died February 17, 1S25. 

FIRST LIEUTENANT SAMUEL STARNS or STEARNS of Waltham, 
was a Lieutenant in Captain Abraham Pierce's Company, Colonel Thomas 
Gardner's Regiment, on the Lexington Alarm, April 19, 1775. He held the 
same rank under the same Captain in Colonel Samuel Thatcher's 1st Middle- 
sex County Regiment, March 4, 1776, and was commissioned June 17, 177G. 

FIRST LIEUTENANT JOHN STRATTEN or STRATTON was an En- 
sign in Captain Thomas Oliver's Company, Colonel William Brattle's 1st 
Middlesex County Regiment, June 1771. He was First Lieutenant in Cap- 
tain Samuel Barnard's Militia Company, Colonel Thomas Gardner's Regiment, 
on the Lexington Alarm of April 19, 1775. Roll endorsed Watertown. 

FIRST LIEUTENANT JOSHUA SWAN of Waltham was a Corporal in 
Captain Abraham Pierce's Company, "called out by Colonel Thomas Gard- 
ner," on the Lexington Alarm, April 19, 1775. June 2, 1775, he received his 
commission as Lieutenant in Captain Abijah Child's Company, Colonel 
Gardner's Regiment. In later returns he was specifically called "First" 
Lieutenant. He served through the year and in January, 1776, became First 
Lieutenant in Colonel William Bond's 25th Regiment, Continental Army. 

FIRST LIEUTENANT BARTHOLOMEW TROW of Charlestown, was 
the son of Captain Bartholomew (who was at Louisburg in 1745) and Mary 
(Dowse) Trow. He was baptized July 25, 1736. June 2, 1775, his com- 
mission was ordered as Lieutenant in Captain Josiah Harris's Company, 
Colonel Thomas Gardner's Regiment. In January 1776, he became First 
Lieutenant in Colonel William Bond's 25th Regiment, Continental Army. 
He was called "Captain". July 23, 1776. (See Force's American Archives, 5- 
1-657.) 

FIRST LIEUTENANT JOHN WALTON of Cambridge was admitted 
to full membership in the First Church in Cambridge, November 4, 1770. 
He was a Lieutenant in Captain Samuel Thatcher's Company of Militia, 
Colonel Thomas Gardner's Regiment, which marched April 19, 1775, in re- 
sponse to the Lexington Alarm. April 29, 1776, his commission was ordered 
as Captain of the 3d Cambridge Company in Colonel Samuel Thatcher's 1st 
Middlesex County Regiment. May 11, 1776, he was Captain of the 1st Com- 
pany in Colonel Eleazer Brooks's 3d Middlesex County Regiment. He saw 
various services in this regiment until the summer of 177S. In September, 



COLONEL THOMAS GARDNER'S REGIMENT 1G9 

177S, he was Captain in Colonel Samuel Thatcher's 1st Middlesex County 
Regiment, and from September to November, 177S, held the same rank in 
Colonel Jacob Gerrish's Regiment of Guards. He died in Cambridge in 1823. 

FIRST LIEUTENANT JOSIAH WARREN of Cambridge, held that 
rank in Captain Phineas Cook's Company, Colonel Thomas Gardner's Regi- 
ment. His commission was ordered June 2, 1775. In January-April 1776, 
he was Captain of the 3rd Company in Colonel John Robinson's (Robert- 
son's) Regiment to serve until April 1, 1776. His commission in this organ- 
ization was ordered February 12, 1776. July 28, 1776, he was marching 
with his company to Canada. In September-November he was Captain in 
Colonel Ephraim Wheelock's 4th Suffolk County Regiment at Ticonderoga, 
"on command with the engineers." Travel allowances dated Boston, Jan- 
uary 15, 1777, "230 miles travel home." 

SECOND LIEUTENANT JOHN CLARK of Waltham, held that rank in 
Captain Abraham Pierce's Company, "called out by Colonel Gardner", on 
the Lexington alarm, April 19, 1775. From March 4 to 8, 1776, he was in 
Captain Abram Pierce's Company, Colonel Samuel Thatcher's 1st Middlesex 
County Regiment, "company called out by Gen. Washington at the taking of 
Dorchester Heights." April 29, 1776, he was commissioned First Lieutenant 
of Captain Isaac Gleason's 6th Company, Colonel Samuel Thatcher's 1st 
Middlesex County Regiment. He was First Lieutenant in Colonel William 
R. Lee's Additional Regiment, Continental Army, February 10, 1777. 

SECOND LIEUTENANT PHINEAS STEARNS of Watertown, was in 
Captain Coolidge's Watertown Company, Colonel William Brattle's Regiment, 
on the Crown Point Expedition in September, 1755. In the following year 
he was in Captain Timothy Houghton's Company, Colonel Jonathan Bagley's 
Regiment at Fort William Henry, residence Waltham. He was Second 
Lieutenant in Captain Samuel Barnard's Company, Col. Thomas Gardner's 
Regiment, on the Lexington alarm, April 19, 1775. April 29, 1776, he was 
commissioned Captain of the 2nd Watertown Company, Colonel Samuel 
Thatcher's 1st Middlesex County Regiment, and served until December 1777. 
In May 1778, he was called upon to serve 8 months at Peekskill. The regi- 
ment seemed disorganized and he presented his resignation which was 

accepted April 7, 1780. 

• 

SECOND LIEUTENANT JEDIDIAH THAYER of Waltham, "stature 
5 feet, 9 in.", was an Ensign in Captain Abijah Child's Company, Colonel 



170 THE MASSACHUSETTS MAGAZINE 

Thomas Gardner's Regiment, in the Provincial Army, and was engaged 
April 25, 1775. He lost a gun at Bunker Hill, June 17, 1775. He was called 
Second Lieutenant in a muster roll dated Camp Prospect Hill, September 
9, 1775, and Ensign in a company return dated October 6, 1775. He held the 
rank of Second Lieutenant in Colonel William Bond's 25th Regiment, Conti- 
nental Army, in 1776. 

■ SECOND LIEUTENANT WILLIAM WAIT held that rank in Captain 
Benjamin Blaney's Maiden Company, Colonel Thomas Gardner's Regiment, 
on the Lexington alarm of April 19, 1775. He was also Second Lieutenant 
under the same company commander in Colonel Samuel Thatcher's 1st Mid- 
dlesex. County Regiment, receiving his commission April 29, 1776. June 13, 
1776, he marched to Point Shirley by order of General Lincoln with the above 
company. 

SECOND LIEUTENANT JOTHAM WALTON of Cambridge, owned the 
covenant in the First Church, Cambridge, February 5, 1774. He was Sec- 
ond Lieutenant in Captain Samuel Thatcher's Company, Colonel Gardner's 
Regiment, on the Lexington alarm, April 19, 1775. He held the rank of First 
Lieutenant in Captain John Walton's Third Cambridge Company, Colonel 
Samuel Thatcher's 1st Middlesex County Regiment and was commissioned 
April 29, 1776. August 14, 1777, he was engaged as First Lieutenant in 
Captain Joseph Fuller's Company, Colonel Samuel Ballard's 5th Middlesex 
County Regiment. He held the same rank in Captain John Walton's Com- 
pany, Colonel Samuel Thatcher's 1st Middlesex County Regiment from Sep- 
tember 2 to 4, 1778. According to a roll dated Cambridge, September 30, 
1778, he was Adjutant for three days of the above named regiment in that 
month. He died in 17S3 and the following inscription is to be found upon 
his gravestone : • 

"1783— In memory of— Mr Jotham Walton — who died April 14, 1783 
— Aged 39 years — 

Farewell vain world I've had enough of thee 
And now I'm careless what thou sayest of me; 
What fault thou sawest in me take care to shun 
There is work within thyself that should be done; 
Thy smiles I count not nor thy frowns I fear 
My cares are past my head lies quiet here." 

ENSIGN JOHN CHILD of Roxbury (also given Watertown) held that 
rank in Captain Abner Craft's Company, Colonel Thomas Gardner's Reg- 



COLONEL THOMAS GARDNER'S REGIMENT 171 

iment, an order being given for his commission June 2, 1775. He was First 
Lieutenant in Colonel Henry Jackson's Additional Regiment, Continental 
Army, from May 12, 1777, to October 17, 1778, when he resigned, receiving 
an honorable discharge from General Sullivan. He died September 3, 1S25. 

ENSIGN SAMUEL CUTTER of Charlestown was ordered commissioned 
June 2, 1775, to hold that rank in Captain Isaac Hall's. Company, Colonel 
Thomas Gardner's Regiment. He served through the year. During 177G, 
he was Second Lieutenant in Colonel Israel Hutchinson's 27th Regiment, 
Continental Army. 

ENSIGN STEPHEN FROST of Cambridge, was given that rank as early 
as June 22, 1775, in Captain Benjamin Locke's Company, Colonel Thomas 
Gardner's Regiment. In a company return made October 6, 1775, his age 
was given as 2S, his stature as 5 feet 10 inches. An order was given Octo- 
ber 31, 1775, that he be recommended to General Washington for commis- 
sion. April 29, 1776, he was commissioned First Lieutenant in Captain Ben- 
jamin Locke's Company, Colonel Samuel Thatcher's 1st Middlesex County 
Regiment. He held the same rank in Captain John Walton's Company, 
Colonel Eleazer Brooks's 3d Middlesex County Regiment, September-Novem- 
ber, 1776. June 29, 1778, he was commissioned Captain in Colonel Samuel 
Thatcher's 1st Middlesex County Regiment, and from June 29, to November 
1, 1780, held the same rank in Colonel Cyprian How's 4th Middlesex County 
Regiment. 

ENSIGN JOHN GEORGE of Weston, was Second Lieutenant in Captain 
Israel Walker's Company of Artillery which marched on the Lexington 
alarm of April 19, 1775. October 6, 1775, his name appears as Ensign in 
Captain Nathan Fuller's Company, Lieut. Colonel William Bond's (late Col- 
onel Gardner's) 37th Regiment. During 1776 he was a Second Lieutenant 
in Colonel William Bond's 25th Regiment, Continental Army. January 1, 
1777, he was made First Lieutenant in Colonel John Crane's 3d Artillery 
Regiment, Continental Army. He was wounded at Fort Mifflin, November 
15, 1777. October 1, 1778, he was promoted Captain-Lieutenant and he 
served until June 1, 1783. He died January 22, 1820. 

ENSIGN ISAAC HAGAR of Waltham, marched in that rank in Captain 
Abraham Pierce's Waltham Company, Colonel Thomas Gardner's Regiment, 
April 19, 1775. He may have been the man of that name on the alarm list 
of Weston, April, 1757. From March 4 to 8, 1776, he was ensign in 



172 THE MASSACHUSETTS MAGAZINE 

Colonel Samuel Thatcher's 1st Middlesex County Regiment at Dorchester 
Heights, and June 17, 1776, was commissioned Second Lieutenant in that 
organization. September 26, 1776, as Second Lieutenant in Captain Edward 
Fuller's Company, Colonel Eleazer Brooks's 3d Middlesex County Regiment, 
he was ordered to march to Horse Neck. He served in the same organiza- 
tion from September 29 to November 16, 1776. From March 19 to April 5, 
1778, he was Lieutenant in Colonel William Mcintosh's 1st Suffolk County 
Regiment. 

ENSIGN STEPHEN HALL, 4th, of Medford, held that rank in Captain 
Isaac Hall's Company, Colonel Thomas Gardner's Rgiment, on the Lexing- 
ton alarm, April 19, 1775. June 17, 1776, he was commissioned First Lieu- 
tenant in Captain Caleb Brooks's- 8th Medford Company, Colonel Samuel 
Thatcher's 1st Middlesex County Regiment. In a return dated December 5, 
1776, his name appears as First Lieutenant in Captain Benjamin Blaney's 
Company, in a Regiment drafted from the 1st Middlesex County Regiment, 
to be commanded by Colonel Samuel Thatcher, to march to Fairfield, Con- 
necticut. 

ENSIGN THOMAS MILLER of Charlestown, was ordered commissioned 
June 2, 1775^ for service in Captain Josiah Harris's Company, Colonel 
Thomas Gardner's Regiment. He was the son of James and Sarah (Lane) 
Miller, and was born November 30 (Dec. 6?), 1747. He was a blacksmith 
and later became deacon of the First Church in Charlestown. He died July 
31, 1832. 

ENSIGN JOSEPH MIXER of Framingham was the son of Benjamin 
and Sarah (Garfield) Mixer. He was born March 7, 1742. As Joseph 
"Mixter" he served in Captain Simon Edgel's Company of Minute Men 
which marched from Framingham on the Lexington alarm of April 19, 1775. 
June 2, 1775, his commission as Ensign in Captain Thomas Drury's Company, 
Colonel Thomas Gardner's Regiment, was ordered. In a muster roll dated 
August 1, 1775, he is given as a member of Captain Thomas Drury's Company. 
Colonel John Nixon's 5th Regiment, "engaged April 24, 1775"; also company 
return dated September 30, 1775. He w r as a writing master. Owing to finan- 
cial embarrassment he lost his farm and retired to Southboro in 17S4. He 
died in Boston in 1802. 

ENSIGN AARON RICHARDSON of Newton was a private in Captain 
Jonathan Brown's Company, Colonel William William's Regiment, from 



COLONEL THOMAS GARDNER'S REGIMENT 173 

May 2 to November 10, 175S. He was a Sergeant in Captain Phineas Cook's 
Company which marched under Captain-Lieutenant John Marean, on the 
Lexington alarm, April 19, 1775. He was called "Easign" in a company 
return of Captain Phineas Cook's Company, Lieut. Colonel William Bond's 
(late Colonel Gardner's) Regiment, October 6, 1775. He was Second Lieu- 
tenant in Colonel William Bond's 25th Regiment, Continental Army, in 1776. 

ENSIGN JOB SUMNER of Milton, was an officer holding that rank in 
Captain Moses Draper's Company, Lieut. Colonel William Bond's 37th Regi- 
ment, October 25, 1775. In 1776 he was Second Lieutenant and later First 
Lieutenant in Colonel William Bond's 25th Regiment, Continental Army. 
January 1, 1777, he was appointed Captain in Colonel John 'Greaton's 3d 
Regiment, Massachusetts Line, "to rank from July 1, 1776. October 1, 1782, 
he was promoted Major. He was retained as Captain in Colonel Michael 
Jackson's 3d Regiment Massachusetts Line in November 17S3. He served 
to June 30, 1784 and died September 16, 1789. 






MASSACHUSETTS IN LITERATURE 



By Charles A. Flagg 



Recent titles of a historical or descriptive character dealing with the state or its localities. The list in- 
cludes not only books and pamphlets, but articles wherever found: in periodicals, society publications, etc. 

While it primarily calls attention to material appearing since the last issue of this magazine, frequently 
titles are included which had been overlooked in previous numbers. 



GENERAL 

Church. Letter written by Doctor Ben- 
jamin ^Church of Boston, loyalist and 
informer, not long after Bunker Hill. 
(Essex Institute historical collections, 
July, 1911. v. 47, p. 233-235.) 

Dennis. The library of the Mass. His- 
torical Society. By A. W; Dennis. (Mass- 
achusetts magazine, Oct. 1910. v. 3, 
p. 2^7-239.) 

Douglas-Lithgow. Thomas Hutchinson, 
last royal governor of Mass. By R. A. 
Douglas-Lithgow. (Massachusetts mag- 
azine, Apr. 1910. v. 3, p. 91-93.) 

Flagg The first published history of 
Massachusetts. By C. A. Flagg. (Mass- 
achusetts magazine, July 1910. v. 3, p. 
207.) 

Notice of republication of Johnson's History of 
New England. 

Mass. in literature. By C. A. Flagg- 

(Massachusetts magazine, Jan. — Oct. 

1910. v. 3, p. 62-70, 125-126, 178-180, 

257-259.) , 

A bibliography of current books and articles on 

the state; continuing the series. "Some interesting 

articles on Mass. in recent magazine, which appeared 

in v. 1-2. 

Natives of Mass. in public life. By 

C A. Flagg. (Massachusetts magazine, 
Oct. 1910. v. 3, p. 278.) 

Gardner. John Endicott and the men 
who came to Salem in the Abigail in 
1628 By F. A. Gardner. (Massachusetts 
magazine, July 1910. v. 3, p. 163-177.) 

Colonel James Frye's regiment, 1775. 

ByF A Gardner. (Massachusetts maga- 
zine, July-Oct. 1910. v. 3, p. 187-198, 
246-256.) 

Colonel Theophilus Cotton's regi- 
ment, 1775. By F. A. Gardner. (Massa- 
chusetts magazine, Apr. 1910. v. 3, p. 
99-116.) 



— Colonel Timothy Walker's regiment. 
By F. A. Gardner. (Massachusetts mag- 
azine, Jan. 1910. v. 3, p. 25-39.) 

The Loyalists of Mass. and the other 



side of the American Revolution. A re- 
view of Stark's book. By F. A. Gardner. 
(Massachusetts magazine, April -July, 
1910. v. 3, p. 140-143, 183-186.) 

State schooner Diligent. By F. A. 

Gardner. (Massachusetts magazine, Jan. 
1910. v. 3, p. 40-46.) 

State ship Mars. By F. A. Gardner. 

(Massachusetts magazine, Oct. 1910. v. 
3, p. 260-1:67.) 

State ship Protector. By F. A. 

Gardner. (Massachusetts magazine, 
July 1910. v. 3, p. 181-163.) 

State sloop Machias Liberty. By 

F. A. Gardner. (Massachusetts maga- 
zine, Apr. 1910. v. 3, p. 133-140.) 

Gardner. Planters' outing. Salem Wil- 
lows, June 29, 1910. By Lucie M. 
Gardner. (Massachusetts magazine, July 
1910. v. 3, p. 208-210.) 

Gathering. Gathering of the descendants 
of the planters of Cape Ann and Salem. 
(Massachusetts magazine, Apr. 1910. v. 
3, p. 146.) 

Hartwell. Referenda in Mass. 1776- 
1909. By E. M. Hartwell. (Proceedings 
of the Cincinnati conference for good 
city government and the loth, annual 
meeting of the National Municipal 
League, 1909. p. 334-353.) 

Kimball. The public life of Joseph 
Dudley; a study of the colonial poiicy 
of the Stuarts in New England 1600- 
1715. By Everett Kimball. New York, 
Longmans, Green and co., 1911. 239 p. 



RECENT MAGAZINE ARTICLES 



175 



Mass. Secretary's annual circular, No. 16, 
Twelfth Mass. (Webster) regiment, June 
1911. 16 p. 
Secretary, George Kimball, 21 Forest Ave., 

Lexington. 

Mass. Massachusetts vical records. List 
of those published under state law. 
(Massachusetts magazine, July 1910. v. 
3, p. 236.) 

Old. The Old Planters Society, Dec. 1909, 
meeting in Boston. (Massachusetts mag- 
azine, Jan. 1910. v. 3, p. 12-13.) 

Old Planters Society. Annual meet- 
ing, Salem, Mar. 1910. (Massachusetts 
magazine, Apr. 1910. v. 3, p. 144-145.) 

Old. The old town meeting. From the 
New York Sun. (Magazine of history, 
June 1911. v. 13, p. 303-305.) 

Phillips. Over the hills to Parnassus. 
ByH. A. Phillips. (Americana, May 1911. 
v. 6, p. 436-413.) 

A tour from New Haven to Boston taking in 
points of historic and literary interest. 

Sons. Massachusetts society of the Sons 

of the American Revolution Register 

of members June 10. 1910. Published by 

the Society, 1910. 258 p. 

H. W. Kimball, secretary, 17 Milk St., Boston. 

Stark. Reply of J. H. Stark to Dr. 
Gardner's criticism of his "Loyalists of 
Mass." (Massachusetts magazine, July, 
1910. v. 3, p. 204-206.) 

Woods. The Mass. laws and Commission 
of Public Records. A paper by H. E. 
Woods. Boston, Privately printed, 1910. 
4 p. 

Worth. The development of the New 
England dwelling house. By H. B. 
Worth. (Lynn Historical Societv. Reg- 
ister Lynn, 1911. No. 14, p. 129-152.) 
With illustrations. 

See also under Plymouth Colony. (Local.) 
LOCAL 



Acushnet. See under Dartmouth. 

Barnstable County. Unrecorded Barn- 
stable County deeds. Abstracts by G. E. 
Bowman. (Mayflower descendant, Apr. 
1911. v. 13, p. 107-109.) 

Part 5; series began in July 1906. v. 8, p. 155. 

Boston. Annual report of the Cemetery 
department of the city of Boston for the 
year 1910-1911. Boston, 1911. 20 p. 



— The Boston tea-party, from Justin 
Winsor's History of Boston, vol. III. 
(Magazine of history-, Jan. 1911. v. 13, 
P- 3-4.) 

— The Bostonian Sorietv publications. 
Vol. VII. Boston, Old State house, 1910, 
147 p. 

— Boston's historic landmarks as val- 
ued assets. (Magazine of history, Apr. 
1911. v. 13. p. 212-215.) 

— Boston's new Old state house. From 
the Boston Transcript. (Magazine of 
history, June 1911. v. 13, p. 305-310.) 

— The library of the Mass. Historical 
Society. By A. W. Dennis. (Massa- 
chusetts magazine, Oct. 1910. v. 3, p. 
227-239.) 

— The State house as a historical muse- 
um By Miss Eilen M. Burrill. (Lynn 
Historical Societv. Register. Lynn, 1911. 
No. 14, p. 153-177.) 

— The Province house. By R. A. 
Douglas-Lithgow. (Massachusetts mag- 
azine, July 1910. v. 3, p. 199-203.) 

Boston days, the city of beautiful 



ideals; Concord and its famous authors. 
By Lilian Whiting. Boston, Little, 
Brown & Co., 1911. 543 p. 
First edition appeared in 1902. 

Boston. Problems and government. 



(Great cities in America; their problems 
and government. By D. F. Wilcox. 
New York, The Macmilian Company, 

1910. p. 346-401.) 

Brewster. See under Harwich 

Bristol County. Colonel Timothy Walk- 
er's regiment, 1775. By F. A. Gardner. 
(Massachusetts magazine, Jan. 1910. v. 
3, p. 25-39.) 

Raised in Bristol County. 

Chatham. Chatham vital records. Tran- 
scribed bv G. E. Bowman. (Mavflo.ver 
descendant, Jan. 1911. v. 13, p. 27-31) 
Part 14; series began July 1902. v. 4, p. 182. 

Gravestone records in the oldest 

burying ground in Chatham. Com- 
municated by A. E. Linnell. Stones on 
north side of road, verified in Mav, 19 ro, 
by S. W. Smith, J. W. Willard and A. M. 
Jones. (Mayflower descendant, Apr. -July 

1911. v. 13, p. 76-79, 175-179.) 
Complete in two parts. Gravestone records 

from south side of road in Oct. 1906. v S, p. 236-239. 



'# 



176 



THE MASSACHUSETTS MAGAZINE 



Concord. Boston days; city of beautiful 
ideals; Concord and its fa-nous authors. 
By Lilian Whiting. Boston, Little, 
Brown & Co., iqii. 543 p. 
Concord, p. 101-19S. 

Dartmouth. The field notes of Benjamin 
Crane, Benjamin Hammond and Samuel 
Smith. Reproduced in fa^-sim le from 
the original notes of survey of lands of 
the Proprietors of Dartmouth, including 
what is no .v the citv of New Be Iford 
and the to.vns of Dartmouth, Westport, 
Fairhaven ani Acashnet. Published by 
the New Bedford Free Public Library, 
New Bedford, 19 to. 767 p. folio. 

Dennis. Dennis vital rscords. Tran- 
scribe! by Mary A. Baker. (Mayflower 
descendant, Jan.-Apr. 1911. v. 13, p. 14- 
18, 120-126.) 
Parts 12-13; series began in Jan. 1904. v. 6, p. 2 

Dorchester. Souvenir programme; cele- 
bration of Dorchester day by the Dor- 
chester Historical Society, on the 281st. 
anniversary of the settlement. Dor- 
chester, 19 EI. II p. 

Andrew Oliver houss. By R. A. 

Douglas-Lithgow. (Massachusetts maga- 
zine, Jan. 1910. v. 3, p. 57-6E.) 

Eastham. Records of the First church in 
Orleans, formerly the First church in 
Eastham. Communicated by S. W. 
Smith. (Mayflower descendant. Apr.- 
July ioir. v. 13, p. 90-04, 162-165.) 
Parts 5-6. (Baptisms bv Rev. J. Bascom 1786- 

1801). Series began in July 1908. v. 10, p. 16.5. 

The 2d. or south parish of Eastham was set off 

as the town of Orleans 1791. 

The records of Wellfleet, formerly the 

North precinct of Eastham. Transcribed 
by G. E. Bowman. (Mayflower descen- 
dant, July 1911. v. 13, p. 184-189.) 

Part 9 (1750-1755); series began Oct. 1902. v. 4. 
p. 223. 

Essex County. Essex County notarial 
records 1697-1768. (Essex Institute his- 
torical collections, Apr.-July 191 1. v. 47, 
p. 124-132, 253-260.) 
Parts 17-18. (1760-1764); series began in Apr. 

1905. v. 41, p. 183. 

Annual report of the Essex Institute. 

for the year ending May 1, 191 1. Salem, 
1911. 56 p. 

Colonel James Frye's regiment, 1775. 

By F. A. Gardner. (Massachusetts mag- 
azine, July-Oct. 19 10. v. 3, p. 1S7-198, 
246-256.) 



Newspaper it 2ms relating to Essex 

County. (E^sex Institute historical col- 
lections. Apr. iqii. v. 47, p. 1S7-1SS.) 
Part 10 (1760); series be^an in Apr. 1905. v. 42. 

p. 214. 

Fairhaven. See under Dartmouth. 

Fall River. History of Fall River, Mass. 
Compiled for the Cotton centennial, bv 
H. M. Fenner. Fall River, Merchant's 
Association, 19 11. 106 p. 

Groveland. The houses ani buildings of 
Groveland. Comoiled in 1854 by Alfred 
Poore. (Essex Institute historical col- 
lections, Aor.-July, 1911. v. 47, p. 133- 
148, 261-276.) 

Part3 4-5 (conclusion); series began July 1910 
v. 46, p. 193. 

Halifax. Gravestone records from the 
Tnompson Street cemetery, Halifax; 
prior to 185 1. Communicated by J. W. 
Willard. (Mayflower descendant, Jan.- 
July, iqii. v. 13, p. 11-14, 150-152.) 
Parts 2-3 (Faxon-Morton); series began Oct. 

1910. v. 12, p. 239. 

Harwich. Harwich vital records. Tran- 
scribed by G. E. Bowman. (Mayflower 
descendant, Jan. -July 19 11. v. 13, p. 
55-63, 66-72, 147-149.) 
Parts 1.5-17; series began July 1901. v. 3, p. 174. 

Records of the First parish in Brew- 
ster, formerly the First parish in Harwich. 
Tran c- : bed by G. E. Bowman. (May- 
flower des:endant, Jan. -July 1911. v. 13, 
P- 3 6 "39. 98-102, 135-141.) 

Pares 16-18 (176o-1792); series began in Oct 
1902. v. 4, p. 242.) 

Records from Island Pond cemetery; 

inscriptions prior to 1S51. Communi- 
cated by S. W. Smith. (Mayflower des- 
cendant, Jan. 1911. v. 13, p. 2-3.) 

Gravestone records from the cemetery 

at North Harwich ; prior to 1S51. Com- 
municated by S. W. Smith. (Mayflower 
descendant, July 19 1 1. v. 13 p. 158-162.) 

Lexington. Lexington chapter, D. A. R. 
By Mrs. G. Ernest Smith, historian. 
(American monthly magazine, July 191 1. 
v. 39, p. 18-19.) 

Littleton. Records of Littleton, Mass. 
Printed by order of the town. First in- 
stallment. Births and deaths. Littleton, 
iqoo. 542, 178 p 
Compifed by J. A. Harwood. Work completed 

in 1909. 



RECENT MAGAZINE ARTICLES 



177 



Lowell. Contributions of the Lowell His- 
torical Society. Vol. I, No. 2. Lowell, 
1911. p. 175-342. 

No. 1 was published 1907. Contents of No. 2: — 
The Manning manse, by Mrs. L. C. Howard. — Boy- 
hood reminiscences of Middlesex Village, by S. P. Had- 
ley. — List of papers read 1907. — Annual report ot 
Executive Commit) ee for 1907-08. — The snow-shoe 
scouts, by G. W. Browne. — Early mining operations 
near Lowell, by A. P. Sawyer. 

Lynn. The register of the Lynn Historical 
Society. Number XIV, for the year 19 10. 
Lynn, 1911. 240 p. 

Marblehead. Personal diary of Ashley 

Bowen of Marblehead. (Massachusetts 

magazine, Oct. 1910. v. 3, p. 240-245.) 

Part 4 (Jam-July, 1774); series began July 1908. 

v. 1. p. 174. 

Marblehead in the year 1700. By 

Sidney Perley. (Essex Institute historical 
collections, Apr.-July, 191 1. v. 47, p. 
149-166, 250-252.) 
Parts 6-7; series began Jan. 1910. v. 46, p. 1. 

Marshfield. Records from the Old burial 
ground at the Congregational church, 
Marshfield. Communicated by J. W. 
Willard. (Mayflower descendant, Jan.- 
July, 1911. v. 13, p. 46-5°. 109-111, 129- 

I34-) 

Parts 4-6 (Hewett-Wright) ; series began Jan. 
1910. v. 12, p. 54. 

Middleborough. Middleborough vital 
records. Transcribed by G. E. Bowman. 
(Mayflower descendant, Jan. 19 11. v. 13. 

P-3-7-) 
Part 18; series began in Oct. 1899. v. 1, p. 219. 

Gravestone records prior to 18 51, from 

the Old cemetery at "The Green," Mid- 
dleborough. Communicated by J. W. 
Willard. (Mayflower descendant, Jan.- 
Apr. 1911. v. 13, p. 23-27, 117-120.) 
Parts 4-5 (Elmes-Mellen) ; series began Apr. 

1910. v. 12, p. 65. 

Middlesex County. The ancient name 
"Menotomy" and the river of that name. 
By J. A Holmes. (Medford historical 
register, July 1911. v. 14, p. 57-64.) 

Milton. Governor Hutchinson's house 
on Milton Hill. By R. A. Douglas-Lith- 
gow. (Massachusetts magazine, Apr. 
1910. v. 3, p. 121-124.) 

New Bedford. See under Dartmouth. 

Newburyport. History of Xewburyport, 
Mass. 1 764-1909. By John J. Currier. 
Review byT. F. Waters. (Massachusetts 
magazine, Jan. 1910. v. 3, p. 50-51.) 



North Andover. The Captain Timothy 
Johnson homestead. By G. \Y. Pierce. 
(Massachusetts magazine, Apr. 1910. v. 
3f p. 94-9S) 

Orleans. Records of the First church in 
Orleans, formerly the First church in 
Eastham. Communicated by S. \Y. 
Smith. (Mayflower descendant, Apr.- 
July 1911. v. 13. p. 9J-94. 162-165.) 
Baptisms by Rev. J. Bascom, 17S6-1790, 1795- 

1801. 

The Second or South parish of Eas*!"im was set 

off as the town of Orleans in 1791. Ear.'.er numbers 

of this series entered under Eastham oniy. 

Peabody. The first house onFelton Hill, 
by D. H. Felton, with the 14th Annual 
report of the Peabody Historical Society, 
1909-1910. [Peabody, 1910.] 32 p. 

Plymouth. Plymouth vital records. Tran- 
scribed by G. E. Bowman. (Mayflower 
descendant, Jan. -July 191 1. v. 13, p. 32- 
36, 111-116, 165-175.) 
Parts 17-19; series began July 1S99. v. 1, p, 139. 

Plymouth First church records. Tran- 
scribed by G. E. Bowman. (Mayflower 
descendant, Apr.-July, 1911. v. 13, p. 72- 
75, 152-158.) 

Parts 5-6 (16S1-1691); series began Oct. 1902. v. 
4, p. 212. 

The old Thomas house. By F. R. 

Stoddard, Jr. (Massachusetts magazine, 
Oct. 1910. v. 3, p. 269-271.) 

The Howland house, Plvmouth. 



By 

Anson Titus. (Magazine of history, Jan. 
1911. v. 13, p. 40-41) 
Plymouth Colony. Plymouth Colony 
deeds. Transcribed by G. E. Bowman. 
(Mayflower descendant, Jan.-July, 191 1. 
v. 13, p. 30-45, 87-oc, iai-14-.) 
Parts 35-37; series began Apr. 1S99. v. 1, p. 91. 

Plymouth Colony vital records. Tran- 
scribed by G. E. Bowman. Marriages in 
the Court orders, 1633-1646. (Mayflower 
descendant, Apr. 191 1. v. 1$, p. 83-S6.) 

Plymouth County. Colonel Theophilus 
Cotton's regiment, 1775. By F.A.Gard- 
ner. (Massachusetts magazine, Apr. 1910. 
v. 3, p. 99-116.) 

Princeton, nth. annual report of the 
Wachusett Mountain State Reservation 
Commission. Jan. 1911. Boston, 1911. 8p_ 

Salem. John Jenks of Salem to Cotton 
Tufts of Weymouth, Aug. 26, 1774. 
(Essex Institute historical collections, 
July, 1911. v. 47, p. 230-232.) 



178 



THE MASSACHUSETTS MAGAZINE 



Old time Salem sea-captains. By J. 

S. Newhall. (Lynn Historical Society. 
Register. 1911. No. 14, p. 208-228.) 

Lists of names of Salem people from 

Timothy Orne's ledger, 1738 to 1752. 
Communicated by G. H. Allen. (Essex 
Institute historical collections, July 1911. 
v. 47, p. 290-292. ) 

Dates and occupations are given. 



The court houses in Salem. By Sidney 

Perley. (Essex Institute historical col- 
lections, Apr. 1911. v. 47, p. 101-123. 

Taunton. Pageant of patriotism, Sab- 
batia Lake, Taunton, July first, third 
and fourth, i9n. [By Ralph Davol.] 
Taunton, Davol press, 191 1. 16 p. 



Topsfielo. The physicians of Topsfield, 
with some account of early medical 
practice. By H. F. Long. (Essex In- 
stitute historical collections, July 191 1. 
v. 47, p. 197-229 ) 

Truro. Records of the Old North cem- 
etery, Truro. Communicated by S. \V. 
Smith. (Mayflower descendant, Apr. 1911. 
v. 13, p. ic2-ic6 ) 
Part 4 (Gibson-Hopkins); series began in Jan. 

1910. v. 12, p. 1. 

Wachusett. See under Princeton. 

Wakefield. An old landmark in Mass. 
[The Smith house.] (Magazine of history, 
May 1911. v. 13, p. 260.) 

Wellfleet. See wider Eastham. 

Westport. See under Dartmouth. 



ipprtafiif of tht^mcriran Jlaolufion 



Frank >V.Gar.dner.M. D-Edit 



State Brigantine Rising Empire. 

This vessel was one of the five authorized 
in the resolves passed in the House of Rep- 
resentatives in February, 1776. These 
documents have been printed in the Massa- 
chusetts Magazine, v. II. pp. 45 6. She 
was built at Dartmouth. Resolves pro- 
viding duck for these vessels were voted in 
the House of Representatives, April 5 and 
18, 1776. A committee appointed to select 
names, made a report, April 19, 1776. 
The suggestion of royalty implied in the 
name chosen for this brigantine may have 
acted as a hoodoo for she was the only 
one of the five which did not make a good 
record. Guns and ammunition were voted 
for her April 24, 1776. 

The Journal of the House under date of 
April 18, 1776, contains the following: 
"The Houfe made Choice of Capt. Richard 
Welden to take Command of one of the 
armed Sloop building at Swanzey, by the 
Hon. Col. Bowers, for the service of this 
colony." This is evidently a mistake in 
the records for the Journal of the following 
day provides that the "Brigantine building 
at Dartmouth be called the Rising Empire 
. . . that one of the Sloops building at 
Swanzey be called the Republic and the 
other the Freedom." 

The full roster of the first complement of 
officers for this vessel contains the follow- 
ing: 

"A Roll of the Officers & men In the 
Service of the Colliny of the Mafsachu" 3 
Bay in Xew Engl d on board the Brig tn 
Rifing Empire under the Comm d of Capt. 
Rich d Whellen. 



Rich d Whellen, Capt. Entry Apr. 26, 1776. 
Jno Hendreck, 1st. Lt. " May 16, " 
Wm. Rufsell, 2nd. Lt. " " " " 

Danl Hatheway, Surg. " " " " 

Judah Wing, Surg. Mate " " " 

etc. 

CAPTAIN RICHARD WHELLEN 
was an Edgartown man. He was son of 
Richard and Jean (Cla^horn) Whellen, 
and was born March 8, 1737-8, and bap- 
tized June 12, 174 S. His mother was the 
daughter of James Claghorn and after the 
death of Richard Whellen, Senior, she 
married December 27, 1739, Enoch Coffin, 
Jr. April 3, 1776, Richard Whellen was 
commissioned Captain of the 1st. Edgar- 
town Company, Colonel Beriah Norton's 
Dukes County R?giment of Militia. As he 
had already engaged as Captain of the 
State brigantine "Rising Empire" he did 
not serve but Captain Matthew Mayhew 
was reported as taking his place in the 
company, June 7, 1776. 

FIRST LIEUTENANT JOHN KIND- 
RICK was engaged May 16 and com- 
missioned June 22, 1776. 

SECOND LIEUTENANT WILLIAM 
RUSSELL was engaged to serve in that 
rank, on the same date as Lieutenant 
Kindrick. 

SURGEON DANIEL HATHAWAY 
was chosen Surgeon of Colonel Jacob 
French's Regiment, January 23, 1776, and 
received his commission March 13. This 
service ended April 1, 1776. and May 16, 
he was engaged as Surgeon to serve on the 
State brigantine, "Rising Empire." 

SURGEON'S MATE JUDAH WING 
was not engaged until July 9, 1776, just 



180 



THE MASSACHUSETTS MAGAZINE 



before the "Rising Empire" started on her 
cruise. 

"In the Houfe of Representatives, June 
22, 1776. 

Refolved that the Commifsary General 
be & he is hereby Directed to Deliver 
to Th° Durfee Esq. out of the Colony 
stores now at Dartmouth in the care of 
Mr. Lem 11 Williams four Cannon four 
pounders, fourteen swivel guns, twelve 
blunderbusses, Eighty cutlafses, two thou- 
sand pound wt of gunpowder, one tun and 
3. half of four pound shot, Six hundred 
Swivel gun shot, seventy hand granadoes, 
Sixty small arms, seven hundred pound 
of Leaden Balls, two hundred pound of 
Sheat lead for the use of the Brigg Rifing 
Empire. 

Sent up for concurrence, 

Tim° Danielson, Sec'y. 
Concurred in Council same day." 

"Richard Whelen having given Bonds 
agreeable to the form prescribed, his Com- 
mifsion was delivered him as Commander 
of the Brigt Rifing Empire fitted out by 
this Colony." 

Council Records, June 22, 1776. 
"A committee of both houses empowered 
Thomas Durfee Esq., one of the committee 
for fitting out the above brig to take four 
cannon mentioned in a return made by 
Major Barachiah Bafset and use them in 
fitting out the 'Rising Empire'. 

June 22, 1776." 
"Capt. Richard Whellen 

By the major part of the Council. 
The Brigg Rising Empire under your 
Command being now equipt in Warlike 
manner & also being properly manned 
& Enabled to go out on a Cruize, you are 
first directed to come to Boston & then 
to apply to the Commifsary General of 
this Colony for such provifions as you 



further stand in need of, and then you are 
directed to cruize on the Coast of the Col- 
onies laying between Cape Sable and New 
York and thro the several Sounds ly- 
ing within said Colonies at the same time 
using all necefsary precautions to prevent 
your Vekel from falling into the hands of 
the Enemy. In case any Vefsell should be 
ready to fail from Dartmouth by the 20 
instant, you are hereby directed to take 
such Vefsells under your Convoy & them 
Convoy to the Lattitude of 3Sd North 
& Longitude 67d west from London & 
then to make ye best of your way on your 
Cruise. And whereas you have received a 
Commifsion by force of Arms to attack 
subdue and take all Ships and other Vefsels 
belonging to lie Inhabitants of Great 
Britain on the high Seas, under C2rtain re- 
strictions you must punctually follow the 
Instructions herewith delivered you for 
your Conduct respecting this matter. 

By order of Council. 

Jer: Powell President. 
Council Chamber, July 5, 1776." 

In a list of captains of armed vessels of 
the state holding commissions August 29, 
1776, Captain Richard "Welden's" name is 
fourth. 

"In Council Aug. 29, 1776. 

Capt. Welden Commander of an armed 
Brigantine in the province of this state 
called the Rifing Empire, having rep- 
refented that he has made a cruife in the 
faid Brigantine, and finds her totally un- 
fit for the fervice to which the is deftined^ 

Ordered, That Walter Spooner and Moles 
Gill, Esqrs. with fuch as the Hon ble Houfe 
fhall join be a Committee to confider and 
report what is proper to be done with 
reference to the faid Brigantine." 

August 30, 1776, Captain "Welden" was 
ordered to deliver the "Risirg Empire" 
"(which by a resolve of this Court of yes- 



DEPARTMENT OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION 



1S1 



terday was ordered to be haled up") with 
her appurtenances cannon and Stores unto 
William. Watson, Esq r . for the use of this 
State we taking his receipt therefor to be 
lodged with the Secretary of this State. " 

"Plymouth, September 9, 1776. 
Received of Captain Richard Whellen 
the brigantine Rising Empire, with her 
appurtenan:es, cannon, and stores, for the 
use of the Stats of the Massachusetts-Bay, 
to be delivered when called for by authority. 
Received per William Watson." 

Two four pounders, six swivels and 200 
pounds of gunpowder from her were de- 
livered to Thomas Nicholson, September 
7, 1776, upon petition of said Nicholson. 

CAPTAIN RICHARD WHELLEN re- 
ceived his discharge September 12, 1776. 
His commission as commander of the 
privateer brigantine "Venus" was ordered 
August 9, 1779. She was a 90 ton vessel 
carrying 16 carriage guns, 8 swivels with 
a complement of 75 men. April 24, 1780, 
he was commissioned commander of the 
privateer ship "General Washington" of 
20 guns and 75 men. He returned to 
Martha's Vineyard after the war and was 
a licensed innholder in Edgartown in 1782. 
In 1790 his family consisted of "2 free 
white males upwards of 16 years, 1 free 
white male under 16 years, 2 free white 
females and 1 other person." 

FIRST LIEUTENANT JOHN KIND- 
RICK terminated his service on this vessel 
September 10, 1776, and we have no 
further record of service. 

SECOND LIEUTENANT WILLIAM 
RUSSELL received his discharge Sep- 
tember 4, 1776. 

SURGEON DANIEL HATHAWAY 

finished his service September 7. 

SURGEON'S MATE JUDAH WING 
was discharged September 4, 1776, and 



October 7, 177S, was a prisoner in Halifax 
harbor. He was sent on the following day 
on the cartel "Silver Eel" to Boston for 
exchange, "reported Surgeon on an armed 
vessel." 

September 19, 1776, it was ordered in 
Council that William Watson should take 
care of the stores belonging to the "Rising 
Empire" and that Captain "Wellen" late 
master should furnish the vessels com- 
manded by Captains Williams and Clouston 
with such articles out of the stores of the 
''Rising Empire" "as he may be directed 
by Benjamin Austin to supply." 

"Bedford, November 7, 1776. 
S r Please to Pay Shubael Cottle Esq. on 
Order the whol ? wages which is due to the 
Brigt Rising Empires Crew as appears by 
the muster Roll made up and Sent in . . . 
& you'l oblige 

Your very humble servt, 

Richd Whellen 
To Henry Gardner Esq. Recr General for 
the State of the Massachusetts Bay." 

"State of Mafsachusetts Bay, 
Council Chamber, December 10, 1778. 

Whereas the Rising Empire hath been 
used as a prison Ship in the Harbor of 
Boston & whereas the said Vefsel is not 
wanted for the purpose aforesaid and the 
aforesaid Vefsel being the property of the 
State. 

Therefore Ordered that the Commifsary 
of Prisoners of War be & hereby is directed 
to deliver without Lofs of time the Brig 
Rising Empire the property of this State 
to the Board of War, who are hereby 
directed to receive her. 
True Copy, Attest, 

John Avery, Dy Sec'y." 

The name of the "Rising Empire" ap- 
peared in the "Knox" pilot bill, July, 1779. 

An order for rope, marlin, twine, canvas, 
blocks, etc., was given in August, 1779, for 



182 



THE MASSACHUSETTS MAGAZINE 



the "Rising Empire", Captain Laha. 

"Council Chamber, August 19, 1779. 

Capt. Laha, 

Sir: The Council having appointed 
you to surperintend & take care of the 
Transports employed to convey Colo 
Jackson's Regiment to Penobscott & the 
Board of War having Wooded, Watered 
& furnished said Transport with the pro- 
visions sufficient fcr the Voyage, you will 
carefully attend to the bufinefs & fellow 
such orders as you may receive from Gen- 
eral Lovell or Colo Jackson with respect 
to the Landing said Troops or relative to 
the disposition of said Transports & you 
will apply to the Commanding Officer of 
the Fleet for proper signals & directions 
with respect to your Proceedure during this 
voyage & strictly observe the fame & 
render an account of your Conduct to the 
Board. 

Attest, Jno Avery, D. Sec'y." 

"Kittery Point, August 23, 1779. 
I Certify that Captain Samuel Laha of 
the Brigg Rising Empire has landed all 
the Troops, Provisions & Baggage under 
his Charge, belonging to my regiment & 
has performed his duty to my satisfaction 
and having no further service for him to 
do, recommend him to embrace the first 
wind for Boston. 

H. Jackson, Colonel." 

CAPTAIN SAMUEL LAHA was com- 
missioned June 12, 1776, First Lieutenant 
of the State sloop "Republic", Captain 
John Foster Williams, Commander and an 
account of his naval career has been given 
in"The Massachusetts Magazine", v. II, pp. 
168-9. 

No further mention of the "Rising 
Empire" has been found in the Massa- 
chusetts Archives. 



Reverend Valentine Rathbun of Pittsfield. 

The editor of this department recently 
came upon the following interesting docu- 
ment in the State archives and has repro- 
duced it here as evidence of the intense 
denominational prejudice which existed at 
the time of the Revolution: — 

"To the Honble House of Repre- 
sentatives in General Court Convened at 
Watertownon the 29th day of May, 1776. 

We the Subfcribers, Freeholders and In- 
habitants in the Town of Pittsfield in the 
County of Berkfhire, Beg leave to inform 
the Honble Houfe That we Conceive it has 
been the Constant Sense and Opinion of 
your Honours that no Minifter of the 
Gofpel ought to be admitted to a Seat in 
the Houfe of Representatives in the 
General Court of this Colony; on the 
General Principal that no Perfons, not 
Contributing to the Support of the Publick 
Burthens, and payment of Publick Taxes, 
ought to have a Voice in giveing or grant- 
ing, the Property of others, not so Ex- 
empted, or in Making, and Pafsing any 
acts, or Laws not Equally Binding on 
themselves and their Constituants unless 
for mere Political Purposes Excused — 

We further would inform your Honours 
that notwithstanding the same has also 
been the Sence of this Town, as appears 
by the Instructions they gave their Repre- 
sentatives the year Past, enjoining them 
to do their utmost to prevent any Minister 
of the Gofpel from haveing a seat in the 
House of Representatives, the Inhabitants 
of said Town have by some Extraodinary 
means Chosen one Mr. Volentine Rathbone 
to represent them in this Honble Court. 
Which said Rathbone we aver to your 
Honours, is and has been ever since he 
lived in this Town the Minifter or Elder 
of a Baptist Church and Congregation in 
this Town, and that he has never paid any 
Taxes either Public or private in the Town 
or been afsefsed to the payment thereof 



DEPARTMENT OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION 



1S3 



but has from year to year for four or five 
years past given Certificates to the mem- 
bers of his Church and Congregation in the 
Capacity of an Elder thereof, in order to 
obtain their Exemption from the payment 
of Minifterial Charges See. 

We therefore pray your Honours would 
Take the premifes into your wise Consider- 
ation and that He Said Mr. Rathbone may 
be Difmifed from giveing his attendance as 
a member of this Honble Court, and this 
we are the more imboldened to ask as the 
Town have also made Choice of another 
Perfon to Represent them whom We Con- 
ceive to be not thus incapacitated and who 
upon Notice will Doubtless attend. And 
as in Duty Bound Shall pray. 

James D. Colt 
Charles Goodrich 
Dan Cadwell 

Eraftus Sackett 

Jacob Ensign 

Ebenezer Soane 

Jacob Ward." 

Reverend Isaac Backus in his "History 
of the Baptists", of New England states 
that "Mr. Valentine Rathbun was born at 
Stonington in December, 1723, and after he 
with many of his friends removed to Pitts- 



field, they formed a Baptist church there 
in 1772, and he was ordained their pastor, 
and they became a large church in 17S0. 
But many of them had now become cor 
rupt in their opinions, and imagined that 
great and new things were at hand with a 
more glorious dispensation than had 
before been known. And in April that 
year a man came into the place, and in- 
formed them that a company of Christians 
appeared above Albany, who had greater 
light and power than any had enjoyed 
before in latter ages; and many went up 
and joined to them, among whom were 
Mr. Rathbun of Pittsfield, and Mr. Samuel 
Johnson a Presbyterian minister of Xew 
Lebanon, west of Pittsfield, in the State 
of New York; and most of the inhabitants 
of that town received them as well as a 
large part of Elder Rathbun's church. 
Though in about three months he left them 
and published a discourse against their 
abominations dated December 5, 17S0, 
which was so well received, that it passed 
five editions in a year, and was read much 
in all parts of the country . . But 

those Shakers are now reduced to a small 
number . . . yet many who had joined 
with them have turned to other delusions, 
instead of coming into the way of truth." 



A Continuation of the Genealogical Dictionary of Essex County Families, compiled until 
Oct., 1909, by Sidney Perley, Esq., iu The Essex Antiquarian. 

LUCIE MARION GARDNER, A.B., Editor 

Essex was the first county settled in the Massachusetts Bay Colony, and all the records of early Massachusetts families 

found in the probate, court and town records of this county prior to the year IhV) are gathered 

and published here in alphabetical form, and arranged genealogically when possible. 



70 

John Burnam'soh, of Deacon John 
and Anne (Choate) Burnam was called 
John third of Chebacco. He married 
in Ipswich May 10, 1733, Mary Bur- 
nam [95], daughter of Josiah [36] and 
Elizabeth (Butler) Burnam. He died 
about 1738. His widow, Mary, mar- 
ried, second, in Ipswich, May 10, 
1744, Francis Burnam [7S] son of 
Thomas and Hannah (Cogswell) 
Burnam. She died before Nov. 19, 
1754, upon which date her second 
husband married again. [See 78.] 

Children: 
184 — Mary 9 , bap Sept. 29, 1734. 
185— Ruth 6 , bap. Dec. 5, 1736, 
186— John 6 , born July 17, 1738, bap. Jan 

24, 1741-2. His grandfather in his 
will dated Nov. 15, 1745, pub. Dec. 

25, 1749, left to him £35, having 
already paid £65 on account of the 
boy's father, John Burnam, de- 
ceased. Samuel Burnam [71] his 
uncle, was appointed guardian of the 
boy in 1754. He was said to be "aged 
fourteen." [Essex Prob.Rec. 332-73.] 

71 

Samuel Burnam 5 , son of Deacon 
John and Anne (Choate) Burnam, was 
born about 1717. He was a yeoman. 
He married, first, Ipswich, Nov. 17, 
1743, Martha Story. She died before 
Jan. 25, 1762, upon which date his 
marriage intention to Mrs. Ruth Luf- 
kin of Gloucester was published. She 
died before Jan. 29, 1765, when he 



married widow Hannah Hooper of 
Manchester. The division line be- 
tween his wood lot and that of his 
cousin Francis, son of Thomas Bur- 
nam [30] was established May 23, 
1750. [Essex Deeds 128-109.] He and 
his wife, Ruth, conveyed to Francis 
Burnam, April 14, 1762, one acre, 
nine rods, on the highway from Ips- 
wich to Gloucester, abutting on land 
of both [Essex Deeds 125-10S.] He 
and his wife, Hannah, sold three 
acres of salt marsh in Chebacco to 
Francis Burnam May 3, 1769. [Essex 
Deeds, 131-265] They conveyed land 
to William Burnam April 3, 1770; 
Thomas Burnam, third, April 26 y 

1770, and Jacob Goodhue and Jona- 
than Cogswell, Jr., Feb. 14, 1771. 
[Essex Deeds, 130-122-3; 131-205 
and 226.] Thev conveyed Feb. 20, 

1771, for £600 'to Stephen Story of 
Ipswich, the homestead in Chebacco 
consisting of dwelling-house, two 
barns and 130 acres of land. [Essex 
Deeds, 130-182 3 ] He died Aug, 14, 

1772, aged about 55 years. Letters 
of administration were granted to his 



widow, Hannah, Oct. 27, 1' 



The 



inventory dated Nov. 24, 1772. showed 
an estate amounting to £234:10:07. 
[Essex Probate Files 4165.] The es- 
tate included a dwelling-house and 
shop with about 30 acres of upland 
and salt marsh valued at £140. The 
estate was insolvent and the creditors 



FAMILY GENEALOGIES 



185 



had in settlement £0:12 : 00 J on the 
pound. His widow, as administratrix 
of the estate, sold to John Burnam 
of Gloucester, shoemaker, son of 
Samuel Burnam, her deceased hus- 
band, "a tract of land in the parish 
of West Gloucester containing about 
22 acres with § of a barn, J of a 
dwelling-house, part of the estate that 
was Samuel Burnam's, deceased." She 
sold lots on Jeffrey's Neck, May 11, 
1773. Guardianship of his son Jabez 
ae 13 was granted to William Story, 
October 27, 1772. 

Children by his first wife, Martha: 

187 — Samuel 6 , b. Oct. 5, 1744; m. Ipswich, 
Nov. 27, 1766, Mary Perkins, daugh- 
ter of Jacob and Elizabeth (Story) 
Perkins. She was born in Chebacco 
Parish May 15. 1745, and died in 
Dumbarton, N. H., Oct. IS, 1818. He 
was deacon of the church in Dunbar- 
ton, "a most excellent man and one 
of the main pillars of the church." 
He died in Dunbarton April 4, 1811. 
He had two children born in Ipswich 
and eleven more born in Dunbarton. 
See " The Perkins Family, Quarter 
master John," page 76. 

188— Sarah 6 , b. March 30, 1748. 

189— John 6 , b. Dec. 10, 1749, was a shoe- 
maker in Gloucester during the early 
part of his life. He enlisted May 2, 
1775, and served as fir«t lieutenant in 
Captain Nathaniel Warner's Com- 
pany, Colonel Moses Little's 17th. 
[Essex County] Regiment. He was 
commissioned June 27, 1775. His age 
on the return in October was given 
as twenty- five years. He commanded 
a portion of his company outside the 
redoubt at Bunker Hill, had two of 
his men killed and three wounded. 
Jan. 1, 1776, he was commissioned 
first lieutenant of Colonel Moses Lit- 
tle's 12th Regiment. Continental 
Army. He was in the battle of Long 
Island and served in the campaign 
following in New Jersey and in the 
battle of Trenton at the capture of 
the Hessians. January 1, 1777, he 
was commissioned a captain in Col- 
onel Michael Jackson's 8th Regiment, 



Massachusetts Line. He went to 
Gloucester and raised a company and 
was ordered to the Northern army up 
the Hudson. He was in all the ac- 
tions until the surrender of Burgoyne 
and the following winter was with his 
regiment at Valley Forge. In 1779 
he served in the battle of Monmouth 
and at the storming of Stony Point. 
In 1780 he served first under Lafay- 
ette and then under C'.eneral Greene 
and was at the siege of Vorktown in 
1781. In 1782 he was with his regi- 
ment up the Hudson and his com- 
pany, the Light Infantry Company of 
the 8th Massachusetts, attained such 
proficiency that the general orders 
contained the following: — " The com- 
mander in-chief (Washington) did 
not think that he ever saw a company 
under arms make a more soldier- like 
and military appearance than did 
the Light Infantry company of the 
8th Massachusetts regiment." Colonel 
Brooks said that "he was one of the 
best disciplinarians and one of the 
most gallant officers of the Revolu- 
tion." He wrote of himself the follow- 
ing: "On the ninth of January, 17S3, 
after having commanded this 'beauti- 
ful companie ' six years and been with 
them in every action, I was commis- 
sioned major. " He served until June 
12, 1783. He was appointed major 
in the second United States Infantry 
on March 4, 1791, and resigned the 
29th of December following. He 
went to Marietta, Ohio, in 17SS, going 
in command of a company of sixty 
men to protect the settlers from the 
Indians. He moved forward months 
in advance of the emigrants. He 
was one of the original members of 
the Society of the Cincinnati. He 
was offered the place of governor of 
one of the territories and was appoint- 
ed Collector of the Port of Gloucester, 
but declined both. He received a 
pension of $500. a year from the gov- 
ernment. He married. Gloucester, 
January 31, 1785, Abigail Collins. In 
1798 he was dismissed to the church 
at Deny, N. H., and in 1S10 was 
chosen deacon. He died at Derry, 
N. H., June 8, 1843, ae 94 years. 
190— Ebexezer 8 , bap. Feb. 9, 1751-2; died 
young. 



186 



THE MASSACHUSETTS MAGAZINE 



191 — Ebenezer 3 , bap. Feb. 3, 1754. 

192— Hannah 8 , bap. Apr. 21, 1754. 

193— Susannah 6 , bap. Feb. 22, 175G. 

194 — Elizabeth 6 , bap. June 26. 1757. 

195— Jabez 6 , bap. Oct. 21, 1759 He was 
aged 13 years when William Story- 
was appointed his guardian Oct. 27, 
1772. He married in Ipswich, March 
2, 1786, Martha Burnam. 



72 



Jeremiah Burnam 5 , son of John 
and Anne ( Choate) Burnam, married 
Dec. 2, 1736, Abigail Andrews, daugh- 
ter, of Deacon John and Elizabeth 
(Story) Andrews of Chebacco. [Essex 
Antiquarian Vol. Ill, p. 98.] They 
were dismissed to the church in Hop- 
kinton in 1746. They evidently re- 
turned to Ipswich about 1752. He 
was a private in Captain Stephen 
Whipple's Company, Colonel Bagley's 
Regiment, from April 10 to Novem- 
ber 10, 1758, in the expedition to 
Lake George. From March 3 to No- 
vember 28, 1760, he was a private in 
Captain Nathaniel Bailey's Company. 
He was reported dead. Letters of 
administration on the estate of Jere- 
miah Burnam " late of Ipswich" were 
granted to his widow Abigail Burnam, 
February 23, 1761. (See Essex Co. 
Prob. Rec. 337-523.) Inventory of 
his estate was made April 13, 1761. 
(Essex Prob. Rec. 338-89. ) 

Children: 

196— Moses', bap. Ipswich, April 9, 1738. 
197 — Jeremiah 8 , bap. Ipswich, March 25, 

1739. 
198 — Abigail 8 , bap. Ipswich, March 27, 

1740. 
199 — Abigail 6 , bap. Ipswich, April 12, 

1741. 
"200 — Susanna', bap. Ipswich. Aug. 14. 1743. 
201 — Elizabeth 8 , bap. Hopkinton, March 

23. 1745. 
202 — Martha 8 , bap. Hopkinton, Nov. 1, 

1751. 



203— Lucy 8 , bap. Ipswich, Feb. 25, 1753. 
204— Jeremiah 6 , bap. Ipswich, Aug 2 I, 

1755. 
205 — John 8 , bap. Ipswich, Aug. 13, 175S. 

75 

Nehemiah Burnam 5 was the son of 
Deacon John and Anna (Choate) 
Burnam. He lived in Ipswich most 
of his life and was a cooper by trade. 
He married (int. Ipswich, March 1, 
1741-2) Elizabeth Burnam. We know 
from Hopkinton records of births 
that he lived in that town for a while 
about 1750-2. In 175S, he was called 
"of Wenham" and was a sergeant in 
Captain Stephen Whipple's company, 
Col. Jonathan Bagley's Regiment, 
from April 3 to July 25, on which 
date he was reported dead. (See 
Mass. Archives, Vol. 96, p. 509. ) His 
death occurred at Half Moon. His 
widow, Elizabeth, w T as appointed ad- 
ministratrix, March 26, 1759, and the 
inventory was returned on the 19th 
of the following month. The guar- 
dianship of his minor son, John, was 
granted to William Goldsmith, Aug. 
18, 1760. 

Children : 

206 — John 8 , b. about 1746. William Gold- 
smith was appointed his guardian 
Aug. 18, 1760. 

207 — Elizabeth 9 , b. Hopkinton, May 1, 
1750. 

208— Ruhamah 8 , b. Hopkinton, May 6, 
1752. 

209 — Abigail 6 , bap. Ipswich, April 17, 1755. 

210 — Nehemiah', bap. Ipswich, July 9, 1758. 

78 

Francis Burnam 5 , son of Thom- 
as Third and Hannah (Cogswell) Bur- 
nam, was born about 1713 and was a 
yeoman in Ipswich. He married first 
in Ipswich, May 10, 1744, Mary Bur- 
nam (95), widow of John Burnam 



FAMILY GENEALOGIES 



1S7 



(70) and daughter of Josiah (36) and 
Elizabeth (Butler) Burnam. In the 
division of his father's estate he had 
the old homestead with dwelling 
house, barns, etc., on the south side 
of Clerk's Creek to the Gloucester line, 
" sd. Francis to pay 2-3 toward the 
maintenance of our mother, Mrs. 
Hannah Choate and 2-3 toward ob- 
taining quit claims" from his sisters, 
the other 1-3 in each case to be paid 
by his brother Thomas. [Essex Deeds 
125-11.] He and his wife Mary con- 
veyed to Josiah Burnam, cooper, land 
in Ipswich near Clark's Creek, Sep- 
tember 21, 1751. [Essex Deeds, 103- 
193. J His wife, Mary, died probably 
about 1753, and he married, second, 
Nov. 19, 1754, Margaret Cogswell. 
He and his wife Margaret, conveyed 
an old Upton lot at Jeffry's Neck, 
Ipswich, June 15, 1773. [Essex Deeds, 
132-83.] He died April 12, 1793, in 
his 80th year. His will, dated Dec. 
14, 1782, was probated May 6, 1793. 
He gave to his wife "Margret," the 
improvement of 1-3 part of his real 
estate and his personal estate during 
her life and after her death, to be di- 
vided between his sons, Francis and 
Nathan. The balance of his real es- 
tate w r as to be equally divided be- 
tween said sons. £6 : 13 : 4 were 
given to his daughter Mary, wife of 
Nathaniel Burnham; and his daugh- 
ter Lucretia, wife of William Cogs- 
well. His granddaughter, Mary Cogs- 
well, daughter of Mary Burnham. was 
given £20 at twenty- one years, or 
marriage. The inventorv of the 
estate, dated July 3, 1793, showed 
real estate valued at £1067 : 07 : 06 : 
personal £131 : 10 : 06. The home- 
stead property contained 130 acres, of 
which 100 were in Ipswich and 30 in 
Gloucester. Various other lots w r ere 



also described in the inventory. [Es- 
sex Prob. Files 40S5.] His widow, 
Margaret, died September 26, 1793, 
in her 7Sth year. 

Children by wife Mary : 

211— Mary 8 , bap. Mar. 31, 1713; m. Jan. 
20, 1774, Nathaniel Burnam. [Xo.334] 

212— Lucretia 6 , b. Feb. 24, 1747-8 ,bap. 
March 6, 1747-8 ; m. Apr. 4, 1771, 
William Cogswell, son of John and 
Mary Cogswell. She d. Feb. 3. 1831. 

213— Francis 6 , bap. Aug. 19, 1750; m. Apr. 
27, 1790, Anna Goodhue, daughter of 
Jacob and Joanna (Story) Goodhue. 
He d. Aug. 8, 1800, ae 50'yn>. She d. 
in Essex, Jan. 3, 1847, ae. 82 yrs. 7 
mos. 10 days. 

Children by wife Margaret : 

214 — Zaccheus 8 . bap. Aug. 31, 1755; d. 
Nov. 30, 1773, ae about IS yrs. 

215 — Nathan 8 , bap. Julv 30, 175S; m. at 
Andover, Feb. 20,' 1783, Mary Gold- 
smith. She may have been the 
"Mary Burnham, widow of Xathan, 
who died at Gloucester Aug. 20, 1859, 
ae. 97 yrs. 

79 

Deacon Thomas Burnam 5 , 
"third," son of Thomas and Hannah 
(Cogswell) Burnham, was baptized 
Oct. 9, 1726. He was a yeoman in 
Ipswich. He and his brother, Fran- 
cis, made a division May 22. 1750, of 
the land which had belonged to their 
father in Chebacco, Thomas paying 
1-3 toward the maintenance of his 
mother, Mrs. Hannah Choate, and 
1-3 toward purchasing the quit claim 
deed of his sisters. His proportion of 
the personal estate of his father was 
£20:02:11 i, for which he gave a re- 
ceipt to his mother, Hannah Choate, 
relict of Thomas Choate, Oct. 26, 
1755. [Essex Prob. Files 4177.] He 
married at Chebacco Jan. 17, 1750, 
Lucy Cogswell, daughter of William 
and Mary (Cogswell) Cogswell. She 



188 



THE MASSACHUSETTS MAGAZINE 



was born June 28, 172S, and died 
Nov. 4, 1775, ae about 4S years. He 
married, second, June 11, 1778, Eliza- 
beth Burnam. He died April 22, 
1799, ae 72 years. His will, dated 
April 12, 1796, was probated June 4, 
1799; in it he mentioned his wife, 
Elizabeth, who was appointed execu- 
trix, and sons William, Thomas, 
Abraham and Stephen, minor, and 
daughters Lucy Burnam, Hannah 
Burnam and Esther Butler. The in- 
ventory of his estate dated Aug. 8, 
1799, showed a valuation of S1902.69. 
[Essex Prob. Files, 4184.] 

Children by his first wife Lucy : 
216 — William 6 , b. Feb. 17, 1751; m. March 
24, 1785, Rachel Andrews. He may 
have been the William Burnam born 
about 1752, who was admitted to 
Essex Lodge, F. A. M., Salem, Oct. 11, 
1781. 
217 — Thomas 6 , b. Jan. 13, 1755; m. March 

19, 1794, Ruth Cavis. 

218— Lucy 8 , b. July 11, 1757; m. int. Dec. 4, 
1778, Nathaniel Burnham. [No. 3S3] 

219— Esther 6 , b. Sept. 22, 1765; m. Aug. 
15, 1786, Ralph Butler. 

220— Hannah 6 , b. Sept. 22, 1767; she was 
probably the Hannah, daughter of 
Thomas, who died in Essex March 14, 
1847, ae SO yrs. 1 m. 3 davs. 

221 — Abraham 6 , b. Sept. 30, 176S; m. Nov. 

20, 1806, Hannah Pulsifer. 

222— Luther 6 , b. May 6, 1772; d. in child- 
hood. 
Children by wife Elizabeth : 

223— Infant unnamed, b. Dec. 10, 1779; d. 

Dec. 11, 1779. 
224 — Elizabeth 6 , b. March 1, 1781. 
225— Infant, unnamed, b. March 23, 1783; 

d. March 23, 1783. 
226— Hepzibah 6 , b. June 5, 1784; d. Jan. 

17, 1787. 
227— Stephen 6 , b. Apr. 10, 1786; m. Jan. 

9, 1808, Lois Story. 

83 

Robert Burnam 5 , son of Jona- 
than and Rose (Annable) Burnam, 
was a cooper by trade and lived in 



Gloucester. He married in Gloucester 
Jan. 14, 1752, widow Mary Haskell. 
May 12, 1752, Robert Burnam .cooper, 
wife Mary; John Sawyer, yeoman; 
Samuel Parsons, wife Lydia; and 
Nathaniel Sawyer, heirs of Abraham 
Sawyer, appointed James Sawyer of 
Gloucester their attorney. 

97 

Josiah Burnam 5 , son of Josiah and 
Elizabeth (Butler) Burnam was born 
Jan. 11, 1718. He married at Che- 
bacco April 3, 1740, Ann Burnam. 
They removed to Hopkinton about 
1744. 

Children: 

228— Job 6 , bap. Dec. 21, 1740. (?) 
229— Rum 6 bap. Apr. 3, 1743. 
230— Hanxah 6 , b. Hopkinton, Aug. 26,1745. 
231 — Lydia 6 , b Hopkinton. Oct. 7, 1749. 
232 — Josiah 6 , b. Hopkinton, Jan. 1, 1752. 
233 — Joshua 6 , b. Hopkinton, Jan. 15, 1754. 

103 

William Burnam 5 , son of Josiah 
and Elizabeth (Butler) Burnam was 
born Apr. 22 (bap. Apr. 23), 1738. 
He was a yeoman and lived in Ips- 
wich. He was in all probability the 
William Burnam who signed an order 
at Northampton May 29, 175S, that 
billeting money may be paid to Cap- 
tain John Frye in Colonel Timothy 
Ruggle's Regiment. He married Jan. 
17, 1771, Tabitha Goldsmith, daugh- 
ter of William and Margaret (Cogs- 
well) Goldsmith. She was baptized 
in Ipswich Jan. 30, 1749. They con- 
veyed land in Ipswich July 10, 1777, 
and in Gloucester Dec. 10, 1792. 
[Essex Deeds, 140-254 and 155-222.] 
He died Dec. 23, 1S17, ae 79 vrs. 8 
mos. His will dated Sept. 12, 1S17, 
was probated Feb. 2, 181S. In it he 
mentioned his eldest son Seth, sons 



FAMILY GENEALOGIES 



189 



Andrew, Abel, Josiah and William, 
and daughters Elizabeth, Abigail and 
Mary, the three eldest, and daughters 
Lois Haskell, Sarah Burnam and 
Tabitha Andrews. He also mentioned 
his son-in-law, Ebenezer Mayo. The 
inventory, dated March 6, ISIS, 
showed an estate valued at $7230.82. 
Children : 

234— Seth 8 , b. March 10. 1772 (bap. Apr. 
19); m., first, Dec. 22, 1S03. Rachel 
Burnam, daughter of Capt Mark and 
Hannah (Goodhue) Burnam. She 
was born about Sept., 1776 and died 
Oct. 10, 1812, ae 36 yrs. 2 wks. 6 
days. He married, second, June 3, 
1813, Rebekah Andrews of Gloucester. 
He died Mav 13, 1858. 

235 — Jonah 6 , b. Oct. 20, 1773; d. young. 

236 — Josiah 8 , bap. Oct. 24, 1773;' m. Dec. 
4, 1805, (int.) Abigail Burnam of 
Gloucester. He died in Essex Dec. 

30, 1843, ae 70 yrs. 2 mos. 8 days. 
237 — Elizabeth 8 , bap. Jan. 1, 1775; d. un- 
£ } married Jan. 3, 1S62. 

238— Abigail 6 , b. May 30, 1776; d. unmar- 
ried. 

239 — Mary 8 , b. Apr 30, 1778; d. unmar- 
ried. 

240 — William 6 , b. March 1, 1780; m. Oct. 

31, 1805, Sally Burnham. He died 
Aug. 11, 1851. 

241— Lois 6 , b. June 15, 1781; m. first, Eb- 
enezer Haskell; (m. second, Jonas 
Perley. "Burnham Genealogy.") 

242— Abraham 6 , b. April 15, 1783. Hj 
was a farmer. He died "abroad" of 
smallpox in March, 1815, ae 30 yrs. 
11 mos. (Ipswich Rec.) 

243 — Andrew 6 , b. Aug. 5, 1785; m. Susan 
B. Motley of Boston. She was born 
1786 and died Sept., 1849. 

244 — Fanny 6 , b. Apr. 13, 1787; m. Dec. 3, 
1810, Ebenezer Mayo, Jr., of Hallowel. 

245 — Abel 6 , b. Nov. 19, 1789; m. Oct. 10, 
1812, Esther Butler, daughter of 
Ralph and Esther (Burnham ) Butler. 
She was b. June 26, 1796. 

246— Sarah 6 , b. Sept. 13, 1791; m. Nov. 
27, 1816, Samuel Burnham, Jr. She 
d. in Essex Aug. 9, 1846, ae 55 yrs. 

247 — Tabitha 6 , b. Mar. 15, 1795; m. in 
Ipswich, Dec. 21, 1815, Abner An- 
drews of Gloucester. 



104 

Abraham Burnam 5 , son of Josiah 
and Abigail Burnam was baptized 
May 30, 1742. The "Burnham Gene- 
alogy " states that he married Susan- 
nah Perkins. No date of the mar- 
riage is given, and we find no such 
marriage given in the vital records of 
Essex County 

114 

David Burnam 5 , son of Moses and 
Ann Burnam was born December 10, 
1699. He may have been the David 
whose marriage intention to Ruth 
Wood was recorded January 3, 1730. 
A widow, Ruth Burnam, married in 
Rowley, October 23, 1754 (int. Sept. 
22), James Plats of Rowley. 

118 

Nathaniel Burnam 5 was the son of 
Nathaniel and Eunice (Kinsman) Bur- 
nam. He was probably the ' ' Nathan' ' , 
son of this couple who was born Sept. 
19, 1700, as he had a brother Nathan 
(119) who was born just one year 
later. Both lived to adult age and 
had families. He w r as a yeoman by 
occupation. He married January 1, 
1729, Ruth Smith, daughter of Thom- 
as and Elizabeth (Emmons) Smith. 
His father, Nathaniel (41 ) purchased 
a large farm in B oxford in 1731-2, 
and the son w r ent to that town to live. 
He resided in that town as late as 
March 16, 1753, at which time he and 
his brother Nathan, "both of Box- 
ford", conveyed 23 J acres of land to 
John Wood. (Essex Deeds, 99-172.) 
He removed to Lunenburgh, Worces- 
ter County, soon after, as he was a 
resident of the latter town November 
21, 1754, at which time he sold land 



190 



THE MASSACHUSETTS MAGAZINE 



in Boxford to Solomon Dodge. (Es- 
sex Deeds, 159-55.) 

Children, born in Essex County: 

248 — Nathaniel 8 , bap. Ipswich, Dec. 6, 
1730. 

249— Reuben 6 , bap. Boxford, Mar. 18, 
1732-3; m. Linebrook Church, Mar. 
10, 1756 (Rowley Records), Elizabeth 
Smith, Jr. He lived in Lunenburg in 
1757 where his oldest child, Phebe, 
was born April 6. His second child, 
Jeremiah, wbs born at Ipswich July 
18, 1759. (Boxford Records.) The 
third child, Salome, was born in 
Boxford Sept. 1, 1761. The fourth 
child, Eunice, was born at Ipswich 
Mar. 31, 1735. (Boxford Records.) 
He was a private in Captain Israel 
Herrick's Company from March 13 
to December 6, 1760. (Mass. Ar- 
chives, 9S-277.) The fifth child, 
Abraham Smith, was born at Win- 
chendon, Dec. 30, 1765. The sixth, 
Timothy Dorman, was born at Ips- 
wich Feb. 2, 1768. The seventh child, 
Nathaniel, was born in Boxford, Dec. 
22 1769. 

250— Eunice 6 ,' bap. Boxford Mar. 31, 1735; 
m. at Lunenburg, May 27, 1754, Tim- 
othy Dorman of Lunenburg. (Box- 
ford Records.) 

251— Simeon 6 , bap. Boxford, Dec, 1739. 

252 — Elizabeth 6 , bap. Boxford, Nov. 22, 
1741. 

253 — Benjamin 6 , bap. Boxford, , 1744. 

254— Phebe 6 , bap. Boxford, Sept. 28, 1746. 

255— Lemuel 6 , bap. Boxford, July 31, 1748. 

119 

Nathan Burnam 3 , son of Nathaniel 
and Eunice (Kinsman) Burnam, was 
born in Ipswich Sept. 19, 1701. He 
was a yeoman in Boxford and married 
in that town December 26, 1745, 
Abigail Verrie. He joined with his 
brother Nathaniel in conveying land 
in Boxford to John Wood, March 16, 
1753. (Essex Deeds, 99-172.) He 
was a member of Captain Francis 
"Parely's" Company, Lieut. Colonel 
John Osgood's Regiment, April 20, 
1757. (Mass. Archives, 95-295. ) He 



became insane and Francis Perley 
was appointed guardian April IS, 
1763. His property at this time 
amounted to £2SS:'00: 04. (Essex 
Probate Files, No. 4155.) His sons 
Rufus and Eli, above 14 years of age, 
chose Jonathan^ Wood as their guar- 
dian July 22, 1765. (Essex Probate 
Files. No. 4163.) His guardian, Rich- 
ard Peabody of Boxford, conveyed to 
Daniel Chapman. 3d, of Ipswich, 45 
acres of land in Boxford with build- 
ings, "near the village line," March 
30, 1767. 
Children : 

256 — Rltus 6 was b. in Boxford June 15. 
1748. He enlisted as a private in 
Capt. William Perley's Company, Col. 
James Frye's Regiment, February 16, 
1747, and marched on the Lexington 
Alarm, April 19, 1775. April 26, 1775, 
he enlisted as a private to serve 
under the same officers in the Pro- 
vincial Army and served through the 
year. In 1776 he was a member of 
Capt Richard Peabody's Company. 
Col. Edward Wigglesworth's Regi- 
ment at Ticonderoga. In a descrip- 
tive list of the men in Capt. Gould's 
Co., Col. Johnson's 4th Essex Co. 
Regt. dated Andover, June 2, 1778, 
he was given as follows: "age 28 yrs.; 
stature 5 ft. 3 in.; complexion, light; 
residence, Boxford; reported enlisted 
for the term of 9 months from time 
of arrival at Fishkill, June 17, 1778." 
From. Oct. 3 to Nov. 10, 1779. he was 
a sergeant in Capt. James Mallon's 
Co., Essex County Reg't, at Castle Is- 
land under Maj. Gen. Hancock. He 
served as a private in Captain Jona- 
than Ayer's Co., Col. Nathaniel 
Wade's Essex County Three Month's 
Resiment, from July 14 to Oct. 10, 
1780. August 18, 1784, he conveyed 
to Henry Perley of Andover, 21 acres 
of land in Boxford with buildings, 
etc., for £107:10:00. 'He died in Box- 
ford March 4, 1836, aged 89 years. 
His wife Sarah died on the same day 
at the same age. 

257— Eli 6 , b. Boxford, July 16, 1750. In 
1765 he petitioned to have Jonathan 



FAMILY GENEALOGIES 



191 



Wood appointed his guardian. Xo 
further record of him has been found. 

258— Bethiah 6 , bap. Feb. 25, 1753 (Box- 
ford Records), bap. Sept. 16, 1753. 
(2nd Ch. Rowley Records.) She died 
in Boxford in 1S01, aged 49 vrs. 

259— Seth 6 , b. Boxford, Tan. IS, l"756, bap. 
2nd Ch. Rowley, Feb. 1, 1756. He 
enlisted May 1^ 1775, in Capt. Wil- 
liam Perley's Co., Col. James Frye's 
Reg't, and served through the year. 
In Apr.-June, 1777, he was a private 
in Capt. Samuel Johnson's Co., Col. 
Jonathan Titcomb s 2nd Essex Co. 
Regiment. From Dec. 23, 1777, to 
Apr. 3, 1778, he was a private in 
Capt, Nathaniel Gage's Co., Col Ja- 
cob Gerrish's Reg't of Guards. Sept. 
27, 1778, he enlisted in Capt. John 
Davis's Co., Col. Jonathan Cogswell's 
3d Essex Co. Reg't, and served in 
posts about Boston until Dec. 31, 
1778. From July 14, 1780, to Oct. 
10, 1780, he was a private in Captain 
Jonathan Ayer's Co., Col. Nathaniel 
/ Wade's Three Month's Essex County 
Regiment to reinforce the Continental 
Army. February 2, 1778, while in 
the service he sent articles to his Aunt, 
Mrs. John Dorman, in Boxford. (Es- 
sex Antiquarian, v. I, p. 48.) 

260— Ichabod 6 , b. Boxford, Mar. 7, 1761. 



125 

Major Thomas Burnam 5 was the son 

of Lieut. Thomas and Priscilla (Ap- 
pleton) Burnam. He was born Feb- 
ruary 19 (baptized 25), 1721-2. He 
was a joiner by occupation, but in 
later legal documents was almost 
invariably called "gentleman". He 
married January 11, 1744, Judith 
Lord. She was born in Ipswich ( par- 
ents' names not given), February 28, 
1727. (Ipswich Records.) He bought 
land in Ipswich of Arthur Abbott, 
June 7, 1744. (Essex Deeds, 92-65.) 
As Thomas Burnam, 5th, with wife 
Judith, he conveyed to Thomas Bur- 
nam, 4th, S acres, 38 rods of land in 
Ipswich adjoining his own land, No- 



vember 8, 174S. (Essex Deeds, 95- 
199.) February 19, 1759, he con- 
veyed a lot of woodland to his brother 
Isaac, housewright. He was First. 
Lieutenant in Captain Thomas Den- 
nis's Second Ipswich Company, Col- 
onel Samuel Roger's Regiment (Mass. 
Archives, v. 99, p. 73). He com- 
manded an independent company 
which marched from Ipswich on the 
Lexington Alarm, April 19, 1775. He 
was frequently called "Captain" and 
later "Major". He died June 20, 
1792, "aged 70." Thomas Burnam, 
4 th , "gentleman", was appointed ad- 
ministrator August 6, 1792. The in- 
ventory of the estate dated Dec. 14, 
1792, showed property valued at 
£113G:06:0S. (Essex Probate Files, 
No. 41S3.) Judith, widow of Thomas 
Burnam, 4th, Esquire; James Burnam 
of Beverly, gentleman; Daniel, trader, 
of Ipswich; Abigail, single woman, of 
Ipswich, and Ebenezer, yeoman, of 
Ipswich, conveyed to Moses Goodhue 
of Ipswich, "land formerly the prop- 
erty of the said Captain Thomas 
Burnam", March 2, 1793. The same 
heirs sold land in Ipswich on the south, 
side of the river by the bridge, Au- 
gust 30, 1794. (Essex Deeds, 158- 
115 and 1S9.) Judith, widow of 
Thomas Burnam, late of Ipswich,, 
gentleman, relinquished her right of 
dower in a piece of salt marsh and up- 
land in Ipswich June 23, 1794, and it 
was sold by her children Thomas Bur- 
nam, 4th, w. Rebecca; Daniel, w. 
Mary; Ebenezer w. Mary; James w. 
Susanna and Abigail.- (Essex Deeds, 
158-150.) 
Children: 

261 — Elizabeth 8 , b. Nov. 27, 1744; bap. 
Dec. 1, 1745; m. intent. April 13, 1765. 
Jabez Treadwell, Jr. She died Aug„ 
25, 1782 ae 37 yrs. 



192 



THE MASSACHUSETTS MAGAZINE 



262— Infant son, b. July 9, 1746, died 
young. 

263— Infant daughter, b. April 9, 1747, 
died young. 

264— Esther 6 , b. June 98, 1748, d. March 
24, 1752. 

265— Thomas 8 , b. Feb. 20, 1750. He grad- 
uated from Harvard College in 1772. 
He was a teacher in the grammar 
school in Ipswich from 1774-1779 
receiving £50 per year for his work. 
In 1778 he was to have received £ 1 50. 
He was in all probability the Thomas 
Burnham who was First Lieutenant in 
Captain Daniel Roger's Company 
which marched from Ipswich on the 
Lexington Alarm, April 19, 1775. He 
was called Major in 1783, at the time 
of his marriage, although the record 
of his promotion has not been found 
in the Archives. He was, however, 
called by that title during the latter 
years of his life. After the war he 
resumed his place as teacher of the 
school for six years from 1786-91, 
again in 1793, and afterwards for 
eleven years from 1807 to 1817, "a 
total of twenty-three years". He m. 
in Ipswich Nov. 6, 1783, Rebecca 
Dodge, daughter of Col. Isaac and 
Elizabeth (Day) Dodge. In 1785 
they resided in the Col. Isaac Dodge 
house. He inherited in 1792 the 
saw mill by the foot bridge from his 
brother-in-law, Nathaniel Dodge. 
Oct. 25, 1794, he and his wife Rebecca 
conveyed to Asa Andrews for £300, 
a dwelling-house with land, bounded 
north-west by the town river and 
north-east by the county road, also 
the saw mill adjoining with the dam 
and other connections of the mill. 
His wife Rebecca died Jan 9, 1795, ae 
33 yrs. 9 mos. He m. second, Nov. 
30, 1797, Mary Dana, daughter of the 
Rev. Joseph and Mary Dana. She 
was b. in Ipswich June 26. 1767. He 
| died March 7, 1833, ae 82 yrs. His 
widow, Mary, died Nov. 10, 1856, ae 
88 yrs. 
266— Judith 8 , b. Jan. 16, 1752, bap. (Jan. 

20, 1753), d. Sept. 10, 1754. 
267— Samuel 6 , bap. Nov. 10, 1754, His 
name appears on the muster roll of 
Capt. Nathaniel Wade's Company, 
Col. John Baker's Third Essex County 
Regiment, April 17, 1775. He 



marched in Capt. Wade's Company 
of Minute Men on the Lexington 
Alarm of April 19th, proceeding to 
headquarters in Cambridge where he 
remained in service until May 10. 
He was a lieutenant in Capt. Rich- 
ard Peabody's Company, Col. Edward 
Wigglesworth's Regiment in the Ti- 
conderoga expedition in 1776. From 
Jan. 1, 1777, until his death, he was 
Second Lieutenant in Col. John 
Gieaton's Third Regiment, Massa- 
chusetts Alarm. He served as Adju- 
tant of the Regiment in 17S0. On 
the muster rolls from May, 1781, to 
March, 1782, he was reported sick at 
various places and at Ipswich. He 
died of consumption March 15, 1782, 
ae 27 yrs. 
268— James 8 , bap. June 20, 1756, d. Feb. 

22, 1760. 
269— Judith 8 bap. March 26, 1758, d. Apr. 

14, 1759. 
270— William 9 , bap. Feb. 17, 1760. He 
was a resident of Zanesville, O., Oct. 
6, 1S15, at which time his brothers, 
Daniel and Ebenezer, acted as his at- 
torneys in the settlement of their 
father's estate. (Essex Prob. Files 
4183.) 
271 — James 8 , bap. Nov. 15, 1761. He may 
have been the James of Ipswich who 
enlisted March 19, 1781, in Captain 
John Pray's Company, Col. Joseph 
Vose's First Regiment. Massachusetts 
Line, and served at West Point that 
year and the following. He married 
in Ipswich Feb. 1, 17S6, Susanna 
Boardman. In 1794, he was a resi- 
dent of Beverly. June 2, 1801, he 
was called "Col." James Burnham of 
the Beverly Volunteer Light Infantry 
Company. His wife, Susanna, died 
in Newburvport May 18, 1805. He 
died May 15, 1842. 
272 — Daniel 8 , b. Oct. 5, 1763. He was a 
trader in Ipswich. He m. Nov. 7, 
1790, Mary Smith. He bought the 
Appleton house in Ipswich with a 
shop on the other side of the street 
in 1793-4, and sold the shop and 
land to John Caldwell Aug. 30, 1794. 
(Essex Deeds 158-189; 156-242 and 
158-189.) 
273— Abigail 8 , bap. Oct. 20, 1765. 
274-Sarah 8 , bap. Feb. 28, 1768; d. Mar. 
27, 1790, aged 22 yrs. 



FAMILY GENEALOGIES 



193 



275— Ebenezer 8 , bap. Dec. 31, 1769; d. 

Jan. 26, 1772. 
276— Ebenezer 6 , b. Jan. 27 (bap. Feb. 2,), 

1772. 

127 

Isaac Burnam 5 , son of Lieutenant 
Thomas and Priscilla (Appleton) Bur- 
nam, was baptized April 24, 1726. He 
was a housewright in Ipswich. Mr. 
Roderick H. Burnam in "The Bur- 
nam Family," published in 1S69, 
gives this man as son of the above 
couple, and also in another place, as 
son of Daniel [131] and Mary (Stimp- 
son) Burnham. He married "Mrs." 
Hannah Smith, int. Jan. 11, 1752, 
daughter of John and Hannah (Tread- 
well) Smith. She was baptized March 
21, 1730. He bought of Samuel 
Kinsman, Feb. 15, 1790, 79 acres of 
land with buildings thereon, on what 
had been the Thomas Low lot, "re- 
serving liberty to the heirs of Dr. 
Joshua Burnam to pass and repass, as 
usual." (Essex Deeds, 15296.) He, 
with his wife Hannah, conveyed to 
his son Josiah Burnham, land and 
buildings in Ipswich bordering on 
land of "heirs of my brother Thomas 
Burnham, dec'd." (The Daniel Burn- 
ham above mentioned had no son 
Thomas.) (Essex Deeds, 15S-290.) 
He died Nov. 14, 1800, ae 75 yrs. 
His will dated Aug. 1, 1798, was pro- 
bated Dec. 2, 1S00.. In it he men- 
tioned wife Hannah, sons Josiah and 
Aaron, daughters Hannah Kinsman 
and Priscilla Burnham, and son (in- 
law) Jonathan Kinsman. His per- 
sonal property was valued at $3070, 
and the real estate at S2S11.22. His 
widow Hannah died Oct. 27, 1820 ae 
91 yrs. 

Children: 
277— Isaac 6 , bap. Aug. 26, 1753. Probably 
died young. 



278 — Hannah", bap. May 25, 1755; m. 
Jonathan Kinsman, son of John and 
Hannah (Burnam) Kinsman. He 
was b. Jan. 7, 17-49, and died in Ath- 
ens, Maine, Apr. 27, 1825. She died 
in Parsonsfield, Maine, Sept. 4, 1795. 

279— Priscilla 8 , bap. Mar. 20, 1757. She 
was unmarried in 179S when her fath- 
er's will was written. 

280— Esther 6 , bap. Aug. 26, 1759; died 
Aug. 27 (26 gravestone South Ceme- 
tery, Ipswich), 1786. 

281 — Sarah 6 , bap. Nov. 1, 1761; probably 
died young. 

282— Aaron 6 , bap. Oct. 2, 1763; died Ips- 
wich, Oct. 15, 1836, ae 73 yrs. 

283 — Josiah 6 , b. about 1765. He was a 
farmer in Ipswich. He conveyed to 
his father, Isaac, certain lots which 
the said Isaac had previously con- 
veyed to him March 19, 1795. (Essex 
Deeds 159-85.) He died July 8, 
1849, ae 84 yrs. 

129 

John Burnam 5 , son of John and Sarah 
(Choate) Burnam, was born probably 
about 1694-5. He was a yeoman 
and mariner in Ipswich. He m. Oct. 
20, 1722, Rachel Smith. He sold to 
his brother Daniel Burnam of Che- 
bacco 1-2 of a parcel of land in Che- 
bacco, bounded on his own land, land 
of Sergt. Jonathan Burnam and the 
Mill River, Oct. 29, 1723. (Essex 
Deeds, 42-169.) He conveyed his 
share of a Chebacco 8th laid out at 
Rocky Hill, Dec. 1, 1727. (Essex 
Deeds, 130-218.) He conveyed a 
parcel of land containing 2£ acres 
with house and orchard "reserving a 
highway from Foster's bridge to the 
saw mill", Dec. 1, 1727. (Essex Deeds, 
130-219.) Oct. 6, 1740, he sold to 
Jacob Perkins nine lots of woodland 
which he had bought of various 
named parties. (Essex Deeds, 81- 
38.) He died February — , 1764, and 
letters of administration were granted 
to John Burnam. (Essex Prob. Rec. 



194 



THE MASSACHUSETTS MAGAZINE 



341-117.) The inventory of the es- 
tate made March 5 showed personal 
property valued at £41 :03 :02 and real 
estate valued at £1G8. (Essex Files, 
341-147.) 
Children : 

284 — John 6 , b. about 1723. He was a 

yeoman in Ipswich. He m. int. Sept. 

3, 1748, Martha Smith. He died Feb. 

2, 1774, ae. 49 yrs. His will dated 

Nov. 30, 1773, was proved Feb. 24, 

1774, inventory equalled £161 :01:04. 

His wife Martha and six children 

(named) were living at that time. 

(Essex Prob. Rec. 350-133-4.) 
285— Job 6 , bap. Feb. 16, 1734-5. 
286 — Dorothy 6 , bap. June 26, 1737; m. 

April 3, 1761, Abner Poland. She d. 

Apr. 7, 1789, in her 52nd yr. 

131 

Daniel Burnaai 5 , was the son of John 
and Sarah (Choate) Burnam, March 
11, 1717-18. Deacon John Choate 
was appointed his guardian, at which 
time he was a minor about IS yrs. of 
age. He was a fisherman by occu- 
pation. He m. int. Aug. 4, 1720, 
Mary Stimpson of Chebacco, proba- 
bly the Mary, daughter of George 
Stimpson, who was born at Chebacco 
March 4, 1695-6. Feb. 15, 1730, he 
conveyed to Francis Cogswell a quar- 
ter of an acre of land in Chebacco 
bounded on land of Jacob Burnam 
with dwelling-house, barn, etc., also 
an acre of land near the corn mill in 
Chebacco bounded on the west on 
land of Sergt. Jonathan Burnam. 
(Essex Deeds, 58-5.) He died before 
1749. His widow, Mary, married sec- 
ond, Nov. 15, 1749, Nathaniel Em- 
merson of Douglastown, son of James 
and Sarah Emmerson. He was born 
in Mendon, Mass., Aug. 19, 1701. 
(Emmerson Gen. p. 74.) 

Children: 



287— Eze kiel 8 , bap. Sept. 1, 1728. 
288 — Isaac 8 , bap. Nov. 22, 1730. 
2S9 — William 3 , bap. Sept. 8, 1734. 
290— Joseph', bap. July 10, 1737. 

132 

Benjamin Burnam 5 , son of John 
and Sarah (Choate) Burnam was 
probably born about 1703. July 29, 
1717, his uncle, John Hitchins of 
Bradford was appointed his guardian, 
at which time the boy was described 
as a "minor over 14 yrs. old." (Es- 
sex Prob. Rec. 312-98.) From May 
22 to Dec. 4, 174S, he was a " cen- 
tenelle" in Capt. Daniel Hill's com- 
pany of Ipswich. From June 26 to 
Sept. 21, 1754, he was a member of 
Capt. John Lane's Company. He 
married at Chebacco Oct. 1*5, 1732, 
Jane Hadlock. She was born about 
1711. He died probably before 1757, 
for in that year Francis Perkins was 
called "Master" of Benjamin Burn- 
ham who was evidently the son of 
this Benjamin. His wife, Jane, died 
in Ipswich May 26, 1781, "ae about 
70 yrs." 

Children: 

291— Deborah 6 , bap. June 10, 1733, m. 
Isaac Andrews Apr. 10, 1755. 

292— Elizabeth 6 , bap. May 18, 1735. 

293 — Benjamin 6 , bap. June 5, 1737. He 
was a private in Capt. Thomas 
Dennis's Co., Col. Daniel Appleton's 
Reg't which marched from Ipswich, 
Aug. 16, 1757, for the relief of Fort 
William Henry. (His father Benja- 
min, Sr., was a member of the garri- 
son of the fort at the time.) Re- 
ported servant to Thomas Burnam. 
From March 29, to Nov. 13, 175S, he 
was a private in Capt. Thomas Poor's 
Co., Col. Ebenezer Nichols's Reg't., 
and served at Lake George. March 
26, 1759, he enlisted in Col. Daniel 
Appleton's Reg't, having served "in 
former expeditions in 1757 and 175S 
at Lake George." His age at this time 
was "21, residence Ipswich." From 



FAMILY GENEALOGIES 



195 



Feb. 22, 1760, to Nov. 27, 1760, he 
was a private in Capt. Nathaniel 
Bailey's Co. He was reported dead. 
Letters of Administration were 
granted to his mother widow Jane, 
Feb. 16, 1761. The inventory dated 
three days later showed property 
valued at £78:11:08. (Essex Prob. 
Rec. 337-510-513 and 33S-109-110.) 

294 — Lucy 6 , bap. Feb. 4, 1738-9. 

295 — Francis, bap. May 10, 1741. He was 
a private in Capt. Nathaniel Bailey's 
Co. from March 6, to Dec. 6, 1760. 
He married in Ipswich April 9, 1767, 
.Mercy Holmes, dau. of Robert and 
Elizabeth (Goodhue) Holmes. She 
was b. in Ipswich, Aug. 31, 1740. 
He d. in Ipswich Feb. 21, 1775, 
"aged abt. 34 y." His widow Mercy 
d. Ipswich. Feb. 15, 1786, in her 46th 
year. His children sold his real es- 
tate in 1790-97. (Essex Deeds, 154- 
52-3; 160-5 and 164-54.) 

296— Moses 8 , bap. May 20, 1744. He died 
suddenly at Chebacco, Aug. 8, 1795, 
ae 51 yrs. 

297— Phebe 6 , bap. Apr. 26, 1747. 

133 

Joseph Btjrxam 5 , son of John and 
Sarah (Choate) Burnam was a car- 
penter in Ipswich. He m. in Ipswich 
(int.5:3m: 1716) Judith Perkins. He 
and his wife Judith, conveyed a 
piece, the southerly corner of his 
"now homestead on the south side of 
the river in Ipswich on the way lead- 
ing to Dodge's Mill," Feb. 27, 1735-6. 
(Essex deeds 71-128.) His wife, Ju- 
dith, died Sept. 10, 1736, and he 
married Jan. 3, 1736-7, Mercy Ben- 
nett, widow of Stephen Bennet. She 
was born Mercy Merrifield and was 
bap., "an adult," Apr, 15, 1722. She 
married, first int. Sept. 11, 1725, 
Stephen Bennet. Joseph, "ship- 
wright," wife Mercy, conveyed land 
to Benjamin Grant on the south side 
of the river in Ipswich, bounding on 
said Grant's homestead lot April 15, 
1737, and May 17, 1738. (Essex 



deeds 77-24S and 74-264). They con- 
veyed to Francis Cogswell land on 
Plum Island in Ipswich "near land 
belonging to the heirs of my brother, 
Thomas Burnam," Feb. IS, 1742. 
(Essex deeds, 92-64.) June 2, 1757, 
he and his wife Mercy conveyed to 
Abraham Choate 3-4 acres of plough 
land, "it being part of my homestead 
in Ipswich." lEssex deeds. 103-246.) 
He died March 19, 1766. Thomas 
Burnam, Jr., was appointed adminis- 
trator of the estate March 29, 1766. 
In the division of the property, Feb. 
25, 1771, the following children were 
mentioned, — eldest son, Joseph, de- 
ceased; son, Benjamin Burnam; 
daughters, Esther Caldwell, deceased; 
Susanna Emmons and Mercy Perkins. 
(Essex Prob. Files, 4136.) Thomas 
Burnam, Jr., administrator of the 
estate, conveyed to Abraham Choate, 
Aug. 15, 1767, house, barn, and land 
in Ipswich, said Choate having pre- 
viously purchased land adjoining as 
above described. 

Children by wife Judith : 

298— Judith 8 , bap. 16:4m:1717; died Aug. 
20, 1728. 

299— Joseph 8 , bap. Aug. 26, 1718, died 
voung. 

300— Joseph 8 , bap. 13:10m. 1719; drowned 
on Ipswich "Barr" Mav 4, 1701. 

301— Benjamin 8 , bap. Apr. 29, 1722. He 
was living in 1771 when his father's 
estate was divided. 

302— Esther 8 , bap. Apr. 28, 1723; m. int. 
Aug. 11, 1744, Aaron Caldwell. He 
was the son of John, Jr., and Eliza- 
beth (Lull I Caldwell and was baptized 
Apr. 30. 1721. She died Oct. 15. 1749. 

303— Nathaniel 8 , bap. June 5, 1726; d. 
July 19, 1726. 

304— Judith 8 , bap. Jan. 26, 1728. (-9?). 
(See Xo. 298.) 

Children by wife Mercy : 
305— Susanna 8 , bap. May 28. 1738; m. 
Jan. 6, 1757, Richard Farrin, son of 
Patrick and Abigail (Avers) Farrin, 



- 



196 



THE MASSACHUSETTS MAGAZINE 



He was b. IS : 7br : 1735; bap. 4: 
7br:1737. He was drowned on "Ips- 
wich Barr" May 4, 1761, at the time 
when her half-brother Joseph was 
drowned. She m. second, Dec. 31, 
1764, Joseph Emmons, son of Joseph 
and Sarah (Holmes) Emmons. He 
was bap. Nov 28, 1736. He was 
probably the Joseph "Emmins" son 
of Joseph, who d. Jan. 9, 1774. His 
widow Susanna, d. Oct. 27, 1817, ae 
79 yrs. 

306 — Mercy 8 , m. Feb. 4, 1762, Beamsley 
Perkins, son of Nathan and Elizabeth 
(Manning) Perkins. He was. bap. 
"5:Xbr:1736." He d. Nov. 21, 1818, 
ae 80 yrs. 

307— Aaron 6 , bap. Dec. 23, 1744, d. July 
10, 1745. 

308— Lucy 8 , bap. Mar. 29, 1746. 

136 

Thomas Btjrnam 5 , son of Lieut. 
Thomas and Susanna Burnam was a 
yeoman in Ipswich. He was called 
"third", when he m. Mary Wheeler, 
Apr. 16, 1728. He conveyed to his 
brother Nathan, June 20, 1752, 2\ 
acres of meadow in Chebacco woods 
bounded by his own land and by that 
of his brother Nathan and others. 
(Essex deeds 102-155.) He conveyed 
to Simeon Burnam of Ipswich, cord- 
wainer, "a certain piece of land lying 
in the southwesterly corner of the 
homestead, I purchased of Jeremiah 
Andrews of Ipswich containing by 
measure 2 acres together with a 
Dwelling House and barn near land 
of said Thomas and Caleb Burnam." 
(Essex deeds 107-35.) He with his 
brothers Jeremiah and Caleb con- 
veyed to William and Isaac Choate, 9 
acres of upland on the north side of 
Cross's Island in Chebacco March 29, 
1758. (Essex deeds 116-150.) Dec. 
10, 1759, he conveyed to his brother 
Caleb Burnam, a corner of upland in 
Chebacco, on the east side of the 
highway from Chebacco to Manches- 



ter. (Essex deeds, 119-121.) He died in 
1762. His will dated July 6, 170 1, was 
probated July 19, 1762. In it he men- 
tioned his wife, Mary, sons Simeon 
and Thomas, and daughters Mary 
Page, Elizabeth Burnam and Sarah 
Burnam. The inventory, dated July 
13, 1762, showed an estate valued 
at £635: OS: 04. (Essex Probate Files 
4180.) His widow, Mary, died Feb. 
19, 1778. 
Children: 

309— Simeon 8 , bap. Mar. 23, 172S-9, was a 
cordwainer in Ipswich. He was in 
Capt. Thomas Dennis's company, 
Col. Daniel Appleton's Regiment at 
Fort William Henry. The company 
inarched from Chebacco Aug. 16, 
1757. He was reported as belonging 
to Capt. Low's companv. From June 
19 to Oct. 25, 1759, he was in Col. 
Timothy Ruggles's First Massachu- 
setts Regiment. From July 6 to Aug. 
13 of the above period, he was in the 
hospital at Fort Edward. (Mass. Ar- 
chives 59-511 and 97-225.) He was a 
private in Capt. Jonathan Cogswell, 
Jr.'s company, which marched on the 
Lexington Alarm April 19, 1775. 
May 15, 1775, he enlisted as a private 
in Capt. Gideon Parker's Company, 
Col. Moses Little's Regiment, and 
served through the year In 1778 
he was in Capt. David Low's third 
company in Col. Jonathan Cogswell's 
Third Essex Countv Regiment. He 
m. Mrs. Molley Wheeler Dec. 18, 
1753. He m. second, Nov. 6, 1766, 
widow Hannah Sargent of Gloucester. 
He conveved land in Chebacco to 
Moses Marshall Mar. 4, 1791. (Essex 
Deeds, 153-180.) He died May 4, 
1816, ae 87 yrs. 1 m. His will was 
probated June 4, 1816. (Essex Prob. 
Files, 4168.) 

310— Mary 8 , was bap. Oct. 4, 1730. She 
m. May 17, 1755, Stephen Page of 
Hampton. 

311— Thomas 6 , bap. Nov. 26, 1732, was a 
yeoman in Ipswich. He m. Dec. 4, 
1755, Mary Hows. She was b. a Lane 
(Essex Deeds, 136, 17)? He con- 
veyed lots of land to Aaron Low. Julv 
30, 1762, and Jan. 10, 1763 (Essex 



FAMILY GENEALOGIES 



197 



deeds 116-214, 215)and one to Samuel 
Bragg "with dwelling house thereon 
near land of Dr. Burnam's heirs" and 
land of Mr.Isaac Burnam.Dec. 18, 1773, 
(Essex Deeds, 135-53.) April 14, 1778. 
his wife Mary conveyed to Joseph 
Proctor of Gloucester and others, land 
in Gloucester which came to her by her 

father, Lane, late of Gloucester, 

and 1-3 of a pew in the Annisquam 
meeting-house. ( Essex Deeds, 136- 
17.) He conveyed to Charles Burnam 
of Ipswich, fisherman, 1-8 acre of land 
in Ipswich bordering on land of 
Thomas Burnam, "part of the great 
school farm." (Essex Deeds, 151-10.) 
He marched June 22, 17S0, to Spring- 
field on the way to camp under com- 
mand of Capt. Frothingham of the 
Artillery with other men to reinforce 
the Continental Army. His descrip- 
tion shows his age 25 years, stature, 
5ft. 9 in., complexion dark, residence, 
Ipswich. He died Oct. 19, 1820. His 
will dated Jan. 24, 1820, was probated 
Nov. 2, 1820. (Essex Prob. Files 4185.) 

312— Elizabeth 6 , bap. Nov 24, 1734. She 
m. Dec. 21, 1761, Stephen Low. The 
Burnam Genealogy states that she 
died June 8, 1834, although no such 
date appears in the Ipswich records. 

313— Sarah 8 , bap. Oct. 3, 1736. The Bur- 
man Genealogy states that she mar- 
ried John Varney, int. Feb. 18, 1769, 
but the town record states that he 
married Mrs. Sarah Burnam. 

137 

Jeremiah Burnam 5 , son of Lieut. 
Thomas and Susanna Burnam was b. 
about 1702. He was a yeoman in Ips- 
wich. He m. March 5, 1729-30, Jane 
Pride. She was b. about 1703. He 
conveyed to William Burnam 2 acres 
of salt marsh in Hog Island marshes 
in Chebacco, bounded by William and 
Francis Burnam, and said Jeremiah 
Burnam, July 3, 1771. (Essex deeds, 
131-294.) June 4, 1779, he conveyed 
to his son Mark Burnam of Ipswich, 
the homestead containing about 45 
acres, bounded on land of Thomas 



Burnam and others and a piece of 
meadow bounded by land of Joseph, 
Thomas and Simeon Burnam, "which 
I had in a division with my brother,"" 
beside various other lots of woodland, 
pasture, etc. (Essex deeds 13G-275.) 
He died Feb. 12, 17S3, ae SI yrs. 
His widow Jane d. Aug. 2S, 1792, ae 
89 yrs. 
Children: 

314— Jeremiah 8 , bap. Apr. 2, 1732, was a 
cordwainer and fisherman. As Jere- 
miah Burnam, "Third," he married 
Mrs. Mary Burnam of Gloucester, int. 
Aug. 30,' 1754. (Ipswich and Glou- 
cester Rec.) Nov. 21, 1757, he con- 
veyed to John Cogswell 8 acres of 
land in Chebacco, "A part of the 
'School Farm' on the road leading 
from Ipswich to Manchester," bound- 
ed on other land of sd Jeremiah. 
(Essex Deeds, 116-76.) He conveyed 
to Joshua Burnham of Ipswich half 
of "my Homestead of land, whole 
containing 13 acres, part of the SchooL 
farm", Feb. 1, 1760, for £71:00:08. 
(Essex Deeds, 119-121.) The other 
half with dwelling house, etc., he 
conveyed to the above named Joshua 
Burnam, fisherman, Apr. 17, 1764. 
(Essex Deeds, 119-124.) He evidently 
continued to live in Chebacco, Ips- 
wich, as the births of his children jire 
recorded in that town as late as 1772. 

315— Hannah 8 , bap. Mar. 10, 1733-4. 

316 — Joshua 6 , bap. Nov. 28, 1736, was a 
Master Mariner. He married Eunice 
Burnham (prob. No. 323) Sept. 16, 
1762. He died June 9, 1791, in his 55th 
year, "lately arrived sick from the W. 
- Indies." His widow, Eunice, was 
appointed administratrix. His estate 
amounted to £170:13:03, personal, 
and £5^0:08:05, real estate. (Essex 
Probate Files, No. 4141.) The "Burn- 
ham Genealogy" states that his widow 
Eunice d. Feb., 1801. 

317— Mark 6 , bap. Mar. 11, 1738-9, was a 
Master Mariner. He married in Ips- 
wich Nov. 26, 1767, Hannah Goodhue, 
dau. of William and Ruth (Preston) 
Goodhue. She was bap. in Ipswich 
May 26, 1745. He died in 1791 or 2 
and his widow Hannah was appointed 



mm 



19S 



THE MASSACHUSETTS MAGAZINE 



administratrix of his estate, Jan. 2, 
1792. The inventory dated Jan. 30, 
1792, showed propertv valued at 
£1233:.07:0G^. One third of the real 
estate was given to his wife and the 
remainder was divided among seven 
named children. Widow Hannah was 
app. guardian of three minor children 
(named) Jan. 9, 1794. She d. Ips- 
wich, July 31, 1S04, aged 59 years. 
His will dated June 26, 1S04, men- 
tions her children. (Essex Prob. Files, 
4080 and records 373-3S-39 and 71.) 

318— Aaron 6 , bap. May 31, 1741; d. an 
infant under 2 years. 

319— Aaron 9 , bap. May 15, 1743, was a 
fisherman. He married, first, Sept. 
25, 1766, Margaret Story, dau. of Jer- 
emiah and Margaret (Harris) Story. 
She was bap. Feb. 19, 1743-4 and died 
Apr. 30, 1777, aged "upwards of" 30 
yrs. He married, second, Jan. 12, 
1779, Elisabeth Sargent. She was 
born about 1758 and died in Essex 
Feb. 28, 1S37, aged 79 years. Re- 
garding his death the Chebacco Parish 
Church contains the following entry: 
" Drowned [with Joseph Emmerton] 
in the mouth of Chebacco River, as a 
part of their boat and some of their 
clothes have been found," Sept. 27, 
1782, in his 40th year. His estate 
was appraised Jan. 7, 1783. (Essex 
Probate Records, v. 356 pp. 40 and 
365; v. 361 pp. 300-2.) 

138 

Caleb Burxam 5 , son of Lieut. 
Thomas and Susanna Burnam was a 
yeoman. He married in Ipswich, 
Feb. 10, 1731-2, Dorothy Browne- 
(Brown. Essex Ant. v. XII, p. 158), 
dau. of William and Dorothy (Gid- 
dings) Browne of Ipswich. She was 
bap. 8: 2m: 1711. He conveyed to 
Benjamin Marshall, three acres, 27 
rods "formerly laid out by the Com. 
Impowered to lay out the common 
lands in sd Ipswich," May 10, 1746. 
(Essex deeds, 90-66.) He died Dec. 
26, 1765. His will dated October 31, 
1765, was probated May 27, 1766. 
His widow, Dorothy, was executrix 



and his son Joseph was given all the 
lands and buildings. Daughters Su- 
sanna Haskel, Eunice and Elizabeth 
(minor) Burnam, were mentioned. 
The inventory, dated July 3, 1706, 
showed an estate valued at £340: IS: 
OS. (Essex Prob. Rec. v. 343 pp. 98 
and 161-2.) His widow "Dorithy, 
wid. Caleb," died in Ipswich July 28, 
1784, in her 74th year. 

Children: 
320— Susanna 8 , bap. Dec. 24, 1732, m. 
June 4, 1761, Phinehas Haskel of 
Gloucester. 
321— Dorothy 6 , bap. Aug. 11, 1734. The 
"Burnham Genealogy" confuses her 
with No. 286 and makes Abner Po- 
land marry both. 
322— Caleb 8 , bap. June 27, 1736. The 
Burnham Genealogy states in one 
place that he was the Caleb who mar- 
ried Jemima Pulsifer,Sept.l4,1791,and 
who perished at sea in the summer 
of 1794; and in another place that 
the Caleb so described was the son of 
Captain Joshua [No. 316] and Eunice 
(Burnam) Burnam. The records do 
not furnish sufficient data to deter- 
mining the parentage of the mariner 
thus mentioned. 
323— Eunice 6 , bap. Aug. 27, 1738. She 
was in all probability the Eunice Bur- 
nam who m. Dec. 16, 1772, Joshua 
Burnam (No. 316), son of Jeremiah 
and Jane (Pride) Burnam. (See No. 
316.) 
324— James 6 , bap. Nov. 23, 1740. 
325— Lucy 8 , bap Mar. 20, 1742-3. 
326— Joseph 8 , bap. June 21, 1747, was a 
yeoman in Ipswich. He married int. 
Ipswich, Aug. 11, 1770, Mrs. Joanna 
Storey. He, with the consent of his 
wife Joanna and mother Dorothy 
"widow of Caleb", conveyed several 
parcels of land in Ipswich including 
the following: — a piece of salt marsh 
to Joshua Burnham Nov. 27, 1783; 
the homestead consisting of dwelling 
house, barn and 30 acres of land in 
Chebacco, to Timothy .Marshall. May 
12, 1784, said land bounded on the 
north by Simeon Burnam's homestead 
and on the south by land "lately 
(To be continued.) 



0urEBU0naI J?a£t£~ 



Rev. Thomas Franklin Waters. 



A summer residence in the country or 
at the seaside is now regarded as a 
necessity by all whose means allow 
the luxury of two establishments. With 
the coming of the apple-blossoms, the win- 
ter home in the city is left and the return 
is not made until heavy frosts give warn- 
ing that winter is at hand This long 
sojourn in the summer home has raised it 
to an equal dignity with the city mansion, 
and it has become an elaborate and beau- 
tiful dwelling. The telephone allows the 
busy man of affairs to keep in constant 
touch with his business, the rural mail 
■delivery brings its daily budget, and the 
automobile annihilates distance. So the 
seeker for a summer home goes everywhere, 
to quiet rural villages, to remote headlands, 
where rocky cliffs are beaten by the ocean 
surf, or to breezy hilltops, and builds ac- 
cording to his fancy. 

No one will question the right of any 
man to build as he pleases, but everybody 
has the liberty, as well, of passing judgment 
upon the good taste or artistic fitness of 
the finished work. Indeed, so many mod- 
ern summer homes are so conspicuous 
from their architecture, and their location, 
that they seem to challenge the on-looker 
to halt and give his opinion of this grand 
creation. Bright red roofs of tile, and 
walls of stucco proclaim that the owner 
has reproduced an Italian villa, and closer 
approach would reveal the elaborate, formal 
garden, with its marble fountain, and its 
beautiful statuary. Hidden behind high 
and forbidding walls, the towers and tur- 
rets of a French chateau peep through the 
trees. The old Spanish mission style, the 



Dutch farm house, with its great wind- 
mill, even the Japanese dwelling and garden 
are reproduced by some, who seek original 
and striking types. 

As an architectural unit, none can deny 
the perfection of each, in its fidelity to its 
type, and its unquestioned beauty. Each 
is well set, against its background of 
mountain or forest, or on its lonely hill top. 
But there is an ideal background with 
which it is strangely out of harmony. A 
subtle atmosphere broods over the land- 
scape, which was not recognized by the 
architect. 

OUR venerable Commonwealth, glo- 
rious in the natural beauty of its 
shores and the river-valleys, its 
lakes and its hills, is more glorious in the 
history of the men and women, whose 
noble lives have consecrated the very soil. 
They were Englishmen and they loved 
their old home, but they loved liberty 
more. They subdued the wilderness, and 
conquered its native dwellers, in pursuit of 
a solemn and impressive ideal, a free Com- 
monwealth, wherein the Kingdom of God 
should be established. They were stern in 
judgment, making severe laws, and exact- 
ing painful penalties; they were subject to 
the strange delusions of their time, and 
persecuted even to death, those who were 
of other faiths, and those innocent ones, 
whom they believed to be witches. Their 
pulpits thundered their anathemas against 
sin, their schools and their college taught 
righteousness as the principal thing. 
They were simple and frugal in their living, 
heroic in their patriotism, sober and de- 



200 



THE MASSACHUSETTS MAGAZINE 



vout in their inward life. Every town 
and village in our own Bay State is filled 
with the fragrance of these simple but 
grand lives. 

This background of memory is always to 
be reckoned with. It is the common 
judgment, we believe, that the Italian 
bell-tower on the hills of Provincetown is 
an unfit memorial of the Pilgrims, rasp- 
ingly incongruous with its historic setting. 
A dainty and exquisite French chateau on 
Burial Hill, looking down airily upon Ply- 
mouth Rock, or thrust into the solemn 
quiet of old Deerfield, would be counted 
as great an architectural outrage as a 
merry-go-round on Witch hill in old Salem. 

THE same historical canon must 
govern everywhere. The thoughtful 
observer will always call to mind 
the story of the Past. He will see in his 
mind's eye the watchman on the hill top, 
searching for trace of the coming foe, the 
scenes of cruel Indian carnage, the homes, 
saddened by the departure of fathers and 
sons for the War of the Revolution, the 
patient, laborious life of the wives and 
mothers, and he will feel himself out of 
sympathy with the modern summer dwell- 
ing, which has displaced an old home, 
perhaps, and which seems to breathe the 
traditions of nations, to whom the Puritan 
was an abhorrence, and bring a strange 
foreign air into our New England land- 
scape. 



HAPPILY, there is no lack of archi- 
tectural types that are in perfect 
accord with the spirit of the Past. 
The stately dwellings of the Revolutionary 
period that still survive, so home like and 
comfortable, may well serve as patterns of 
beautiful homes. The venerable gambrel- 
roofed dwelling of an earlier period is still 
admirable In its solidity and dignity. The 
four-square, hipped-roof mansion is the 
very embodiment of substantial quality. 
And if more ambitious types and patterns 
are demanded, the English mansion, of 
the olden time cannot be bettered. Xot a 
few of the grand mansions of today have 
been built after their design, of rough brick 
and plain sandstone, with solid wails and 
great chimneys, suggestive of spacious fire- 
places and much good cheer, beautiful with 
Nature's own adornment of lawns, and 
groves and gardens. Such were the houses 
that our forefathers knew, and from 
homes like these some of them came- 
They blend w r ith perfect congruity with 
our New England landscape, with the his- 
tory and traditions of the New England 
men and the simplicity and comfort of 
New England homes. 

With such rich material at hand, what 
need of going far afield for that which is 
foreign and strange, often grotesque in its 
incongruity, often gaudy and glaring, al- 
ways stiff and unsocial? Why may not 
the newest palatial mansion be built in 
such delicate harmony with the long his- 
tory of the spot in which it stands, that it 
will breathe the air, not of a foreign palace, 
but of a home, a true New England home? 



THE 



4ASSACHVSETTS 
MAGAZINE 




bushed by the Salem Press Co. Sale m.Mass. U.S.A. 



A Quarterly cMagazine Devoted to History, Genealogy and Biography^ 
Thomas Franklin Waters, Editor, ipswich, mass. 

ASSOCIATE AXD ADVISORY EDITORS 

George Sheldon, Dr. Frank A. Gardner, Lucie M Gardner 

DEERFIELD, MASS. SALEM, MASS. SALEM, MASS. " ' 

Charles A. Flaog, John N". McClintock, Albert W. Dennis 

WASHINGTON-, D. C. DOECHESTEK, MASS. SALEM, 'm,,.' 

Issued in January, April, July and October. Subscription, $2.50 per year, Single copies, 75c 
VOL. IV OCTOBER, 191 1 NO. 4 



Cmticnfs af iljts }z*\\z 



Governor Eugene N. Foss 203 

The Moseley House Louis M. Dewey . 211 

Massachusetts in Literature Charles A. Flagg . 213 

Massachusetts Pioneers in Michigan .... Charles A. Flagg . 216 

Colonel Samuel Gerrish's Regiment . . F. A.Gardner, M.D. . 221 

Department of the American Revolution F. A. Gardner, M.D. . 244 

Family Genealogies . . ... . Lucie M. Gardner , 247 

Criticism and Comment 260 

Our Editorial Pages Thomas F. Waters . 262 



CORRESPONDENCE of a business nature should be sent to The Massachusetts Magazine, Salem, Mass. 

CORRESPONDENCE in regard to contributions to the Magazine may be sent to the editor, Rev. T. F. 
Waters, Ipswich, Mass., or to the office of publication in Salem. 

BOOKS for review may be sent to the offioeof publication in Salem. Books should not be sent to individual 
editors of the Magazine, unless by previous correspondence the editor consents to review the book. 

SUBSCRIPTIONS should be sent to The Massachusetts Magazine, Salem, Mass. Subscriptions are $2.50 
payable in advance, post paid to any address in the United Stat -s or Canada. To foreign countries in the 
Postal Union, $2.75. Single copies of back numbers, 75 cents each. 

REMITTANCES may be made in currency or two cent postage stamps; many subscriptions are sent throuch 
the mail in this way, "and they are seldom lost, but such remittances must be" at the risk of the sender. To 
avoid all danger of loss send by post-office money order, bank check, or express money order. 

CHANGES OF ADDRESS. When a subscriber makes a change of address, he should notifj the publisher?, 
giving both his old and new addresses. The publishers cannot be responsible for lost copies, if they are not 
notified of such changes. 

ON SALE. Copies of this magazine are on sale in Boston, at W. B. Clark's & Co., 26 Tremont Street, Old 
Corner Book Store, 29 Brorn field Street, Geo. E. Littlefield, 67 Cornhill, Smith & McCance, 3S Brom field Street . 
in New York, at John Wanamaker's, Broadwav, +th, 9th and 10th Streets; in Philadelphia, Am. Baptist Pub. 
Society, 1630 Chestnut Street; in Washington, at Brentanos, F & 13th St.; in Chicago, at A. C. McClurg's 4 Lo.. 
221 Wabash Ave.; in London, at B.F.Stevens & Brown, 4 Trafalgar Sq. Also on sale at principal stands of 
N. E. News Co. 

Entered as second-class matter March 13, 1908, at the post office at Salem, Mass., under the act of CongreM 
of March 3, 1879. Office of publication, 300 Essex Street, Salem, Mass. 




GOVERNOR EUGENE N. FOSS 



It is literally true that Governor Eugene N. Foss was "fired" into politics. 
Seldom has there been a stranger incident connected with the political career 
of any public man than that which marked the introduction of Eugene Noble 
Foss to the political world. 

While travelling through the South in 1901 he received a telegram stating 
that fire had practically destroyed his big works at Jamaica Plain. He im- 
mediately returned home and was confronted with a ruined factory and much 
advice. His business associates said to him: — "Of course you will not think 
of rebuilding in Massachusetts. You will remove your plant nearer to the 
base of supplies of your raw materials, either at Pittsburg or in the South — 
as, owing to tariff restrictions, you are unable to get your raw material in 
New England at a price that will enable you to compete in the markets of the 
world." 

As a big business man this problem had never confronted him in exactly 
this shape before, and he thought it over very carefully. When he arrived 
at his decision, he said: "I have made up my mind to rebuild in New Eng- 
land. I have faith in New England and Massachusetts, and if the laws of my 
country are such that I am seriously handicapped by tariff regulations, I will 
endeavor to do what I can to so change those laws that industries will no 
longer be driven from Massachusetts. Many of the men have been in my 
employ for more than a quarter of a century. They are rooted to the sod 
of Massachusetts by social, church and family ties. . Their children are being 
educated in the public schools of this Commonwealth, and it would be unfair 



204 THE MASSACHUSETTS MAGAZINE 

to them to uproot this great organization and transplant it to a new, and to 
them strange country; and I will not do it." 

So he began the study of tariff conditions, with the result that he entered 
into political life, with a view to changing the conditions which for years had 
acted adversely upon Massachusetts industries. 

On looking over the ground he found that most of the iron business of 
Massachusetts had been indeed driven South. He found that the furniture 
business, which employed a score of thousand men in Charlestown, East 
Cambridge and other suburbs of Boston, had been completely annihilated 
and had removed to Michigan in order to be nearer its base of supplies, 
while only 150 miles away, across our northern border, were almost limitless 
forests containing the best possible furniture lumber in the world, but which 
was unavailable to Massachusetts manufacturers owing to the tariff. Other 
industries had suffered, if not in the same proportion, very severely, owing to 
the tariff handicap. Massachusetts tanneries had largely been driven from 
the field. The shoe business, which w r as at one time practically controlled in 
Massachusetts, was moving westward. 

He ran for Congress on the Republican ticket, only to be defeated; but 
with that indomitable courage which had characterized his entire business life 
he kept persistently at it, regarding every defeat as a victory. He advo- 
cated in his first campaign a revision of the tariff downward and reciprocity 
with Canada, and directed his efforts along these lines. Bear in mind that 
Mr. Foss was one of the biggest business men in New England, — prominent 
as a manufacturer and interested in transportation lines both on land and 
sea. He had always devoted his life to his business interests and never had 
given particular attention to the political conditions. It was only when these 
conditions were brought forcibly home to him by the destruction of his works 
that his eyes were opened and he began to take a leading part in the tariff 
revision and reciprocity movement, — not because of personal political ambi- 
tions but that he might impress upon the people th3 necessity of legislation 
which would bring about better business conditions for New England. 

He saw that the time had come for business men to enter politics in order 
that their interests might be protected. He was a life-long Republican and his 
sole desire was to suggest to his party the advisability of reaffirming the princi- 
ple of commercial reciprocity with which the party had been identified in the 
past. He saw with increasing regret that the tendency of the Republican 
party was toward an increase in duties rather than a revision downward ; 
and he fought against this policy with all the earnestness of a business man 



GOVERNOR EUGENE N. FOSS 205 

who sees his party pursuing a policy that his business judgment condemned. 

In 1904, when he was a candidate for delegate-at-large to the Republican 
national convention in Chicago, after he had delivered his appeal before the 
Republican state convention, United States Senator Henry Cabot Lodge 
said to him, as he turned to leave the stage; — "Foss, you don't belong in 
the Republican party. You should go over to the Democratic party." 
Looking the Senator in the eye, he said: — "Senator Lodge, the day will come 
when you will regret making that statement." 

On the passage of the Payne-Aldrich act the day came when Mr. Foss 
saw that Senator Lodge was right, — that it was hopeless to think of securing 
the legislation that New England so needed and that the country demanded, 
under Republican leadership as then constituted, and he became a candidate 
for Lieutenant-Governor on the Democratic ticket, not because he sought the 
office but because he saw a w T ay in which he could obtain from the people o 
Massachusetts an expression of their opinion upon the Payne-Aldrich act. 
He went before the people standing on exactly the same platform on which 
he had started as a Republican candidate for Congress seven years before. 
In a campaign of twenty-eight days in which he discussed the tariff issue, its 
relation to the high cost of living, and advocated reciprocity with our north- 
ern neighbor, urging the people of Massachusetts to rebuke the stand-patters 
of the Republican party, — he cut dowm a Republican majority of 96,000 to 
one of 7,000. 

The following winter Congressman William C. Lovering, who represented 
the Fourteenth Congressional District of Massachusetts, died in office, and a 
new election w r as called to elect his successor. Much against his own incli- 
nation, Mr. Foss became a candidate on the Democratic ticket. It was an 
almost hopeless task that confronted him, because it was a Republican con- 
stituency, which had" never had a Republican majority of less than 14,000, 
and there w r as not a Democratic precinct, ward, village or city in the ent're 
district, while the total Democratic strength had averaged less than 5,000 
since the district had been created. 

In a campaign lasting but eight days, in which he visited every town and 
city in the district, he overturned that Republican majority of 14,000 and 
secured a Democratic majority of nearly 6,000. It was the most sweeping 
condemnation of the Payne-Aldrich act that could possibly be imagined and 
its effect upon the country was tremendous. 

It was a curious scene in the House of Representatives when Congress- 
man Eugene N. Foss marched down the aisle of the House on the arm of his 



206 THE MASSACHUSETTS MAGAZINE 

brother, a Republican Congressman from Illinois, and took the oath of office. 

The next fall, after one of the most bitter quarrels in convention that the 
Democratic party had ever wittnessed, he became the Democratic nominee 
for Governor, at a time when any one else would have considered that the 
nomination did not amount to the paper that it was written on. With im- 
plicit faith that the people were still highly iniignant at the outrageous an 1 
iniquitous Payne- Aldrich act, he accepted the nomination and was electel 
Governor of Massachusetts, — the only man on the Democratic state ticket to 
be elected, with a majority of 35,000 votes. Again Massachusetts ha 1 pro- 
nounced her opinion upon the Payne-Aldrich act. Believed to be the chief 
beneficiary of the ultra-high protective tariff, Massachusetts had repudiated 
it twice at the polls within eight months. 

In his campaign Mr. Foss connected the high prices with the high tariff. 
He pointed out to the people that everything they ate, drank or wore, as 
well as the roofs that sheltered them, cost them the more because of this 
ultra high protective tariff. He told them that their little boys and girls were 
compelled to leave school at the earliest possible legal age in order that the 
earnings of their little hands might contribute to the family treasurv; and 
that their children were thus deprived of the education to which they were 
justly entitled, in order that a few, sheltered behind the protective tariff 
privilege, might give away millions in charity or spend it lavishly for their 
own pleasure. 

He appealed to his audiences in plain simple terms, — as he is not an 
orator and discusses public questions as a business man, — to note that the 
steadily rising cost of living was coincident with the steadily rising tariff 
legislation at the hands of the Republican party. It had become a great 
problem, not only with the people of Massachusetts but all over the country, 
how the average family could make both ends meet, for wages had not 
increased in proportion to the cost of living, and many sacrifices had to be 
made in the home and on the table, in order that the weekly wage might 
meet the weekly requirements. So it was that thousands of Republicans for 
the first time in their lives voted the Democratic ticket as a protest against 
a policy which was "making the conditions of life more difficult and which 
threatened even more serious injury to the industrial and commercial devel- 
opment of the nation." 

On his election as Governor, he turned the energy that had gained his 
-marvellous business success from every other pursuit to the interests of the 
people of Massachusetts. He was daily at the State House, often arriving 



GOVERNOR ENGENE N. FOSS 207 

there by eight in the morning and frequently not leaving the executive cham- 
ber until shortly before midnight. With his own business office not ten 
minutes away from the State House and with the vast business interests 
which had hitherto absorbed his entire attention, he never crossed the 
threshold of his business office from the time he was inaugurated until the 
day the Legislature adjourned. 

As Governor he devoted himself toward progressive legislation and in an 
inaugural address that w r as noted all over the country for the clearness and 
forcefulness of its utterance, as well as its progressive nature, he proposed 
much remedial legislation and thereafter bended his every effort to securing 
the enactment of his recommendations into law. He faced a hostile legis- 
lature and a hostile council, and yet he secured the enactment into law of 
nearly 80 per cent, of the measures which he advocated in his inaugural 
address. 

Among the things which he advocated and which became a part of the 
laws of the Commonwealth were: — direct nomination of state officers; the 
limitation of campaign expenses; a workmen's compensation law for injured 
employees, upon which the Supreme Court cf Massachusetts pronounced 
favorably; an anti-injunction bill giving the right of trial by jury; fifty-four 
hours a week for women and children; a plan for part time schooling for 
working children; an eight hour day for public employees; pensions for 
state employees and city laborers in Boston; an investigation of minimum 
wage legislation; a plan to improve the prison industries; the investigation 
of the sale of prison made goods in open market ; a plan to assist workmen 
to secure suburban homes; an investigation of stock selling holding com- 
panies; supervision of loan business, to protect small borrowers; compensation 
for suspected persons, confined before trial; efficient and humane administra- 
tion of the public institutions; abolishment of solitary confinement in re- 
formatories; a bill appropriating nine million dollars for the improvement of 
Boston harbor; plans for the development of water-ways; the consolidation 
of the West End and Boston Elevated Railways; an increase in the number 
of judges and in their salaries. 

He gave a practical business administration, — an administration which 
was noted particularly by the character of his judicial appointments. He 
had many important judicial appointments to make, and he was determined 
that the character of his appointees should be such that their fitness should 
be apparent to the people of the Commonwealth ; and not one word of crit- 
icism has been found with any appointment of this nature which he ha 



208 THE MASSACHUSETTS MAGAZINE 

made. He made fitness and not political service the test, and was by no 
means confined to the limitation of party in his selection of public officials. 
It is true that such a course often brought upon him the protests of the 
party leaders, but he believed that there were other tests beside those of 
partisanship, and was not swayed from his course by any consideration of a 
possible effect upon his future political career. 

The campaign for re-election found a curious condition of affairs in Mas- 
sachusetts. The President, who makes his summer home in Massachusetts. 
had at the opening of the Republican campaign at Hamilton, outlined the 
policy of the Republican party in the State campaign in Massachusetts by 
declaring that the issue was the tariff. Republican leaders, large and small, 
accepted the President's idea. 

It was realized that, owing to the two victories of Mr. Foss as Congress- 
man and Governor, in which the tariff issue played the principal part, the 
high protective system of tariff had received a rebuke at the hands of the 
people of Massachusetts. It was realized that the Presidential contest was 
but a year away and if protected Massachusetts, the chief beneficiary of the 
Payne-Aldrich act, should repudiate high protection again at the polls, the 
effect upon the country at large would be disastrous from the Republican 
stand-point. Thus the President himself picked the issue for the State cam- 
paign and decided in an off year that the contest in Massachusetts in 1911 
was to be a sort of trial horse for the Presidential campaign of 1912. 

Governor Foss, while willing to discuss either State or National issues. — 
willing to be judged upon his own record as Governor or willing to stand as 
the apostle for a tariff revision downward and reciprocity, — accepted the 
gage of battle as thrown down by President Taft. 

The Republican party introduced speakers of national prominence from 
outside the State. The American Protective Tariff League flooded the 
manufacturing cities and towns with literature. The American Woollen 
Company spent hundreds of thousands of dollars in advertising. The textile 
industries were called upon to contribute vast sums of money toward carrying 
the election for the Republican party, and the slogan throughout the cam- 
paign was "Stand by President Taft and the protective system." 

Republican orators boldly stated that a vote for Governor Foss meant 
the shutting down of the textile industries in Massachusetts, the destruction 
of the industries of the Commonwealth, soup-houses for the employees and 
general disaster to follow in the wake of his election. Literature of this nature 
was enclosed in the pay envelopes at many of the mills. 



GOVERNOR EUGENE N. FOSS 209 

Money never was spent more lavishly by the Republican party and by 
the protected interests than in Massachusetts during the gubernatorial cam- 
paign of 1911. A corrupt practices act had been passed by the Legislature of 
1911 and signed by Governor Foss, which provided that a candidate for office 
should not contribute more than five thousand dollars to the campaign and 
expend for certain personal expenses whatever sum might be necessary. 
Governor Foss lived up to the law which he had signed and refused even by 
subterfuge to attempt to evade it or allow his friends to evade it; but he 
went through the State discussing the issue of a lower revision of the tariff, 
the securing of a genuine reciprocity treaty with Canada and with other 
nations, and refused to have outside speakers imported into the State, — 
single handed and alone appealing to the people as he had done twice before. 

Wh^n the election day came the Democratic State Committee did not 
have a single hired worker at the polls, nor a conveyance of any kind 
throughout the State, while the Republican forces were amply supplied with 
both workers at the polls and conveyances without number. When the vote 
was counted Massachusetts had again repudiated the Payne- Aldrich act and 
had sent word to the Nation that, so far as Massachusetts was concerned, its 
verdict for 1912 was registered, and it was absolutely opposed to the protec- 
tion which robs the people for the benefit of the few and which has in- 
creased the cost of living so that the average wage-earner gazes at the future 
with apprehension and dismay. 

Governor Foss has now been inaugurated for his second term, and in his 
message to the Legislature, outlining his views, he calls attention — "to the 
most imperative need of New England, and, in fact, the whole country, 
namely, the removal of the discriminating tariff provisions which impose 
unfair burdens upon industry and- commerce. For example, one hundred 
years ago Boston was easily the leading port of the country and should be 
today. Yet in 1910 the imports at Boston were only $129,000,000, and the 
exports $71,000,000, as against $936,000,000, and $652,000,000 respectively, 
at New York, and $56,000,000, and $140,000,000, respectively, at New 
Orleans, the exports of New Orleans being twice as great as those of Boston." 

'"The hope of New England is in increased industrial activity and the 
production of manufactures, and increased use as a terminal for the impor- 
tation of the world's products, a centre for their distribution throughout 
the Union, and an outlet for the products of this continent designed for 
foreign markets." 

"The barrier to American exports is the tariff on the raw materials of 



210 THE MASSACHUSTTS MAGAZINE 

manufactures, the tariff on food stuffs consumed by American workmen, and 
the superfluous rates on many articles used by all the people. These duties 
on imports work as a tax on exports, for they increase the cost of produc- 
tion in this country and make it difficult for American manufacturers to 
compete in foreign markets. Limited principally to the home market, our 
manufacturers can supply the demand by working their plants to only eighty 
per cent of their capacity, and they are compelled to make their workmen 
and the American consumer bear the loss of the difference. The limitation 
of exports work again as a barrier to imports and as a general restraint of 
commerce." 

The superfluous protection in tariff schedules has favored the formation 
of monopolies designed to secure the total margin of price between the low 
price-level, where domestic competition ceases, and the high level, where for- 
eign competition begins." 

"We must have an absolute reduction in the present tariff rates, and a 
further special reduction through reciprocal trade agreements with other 
countries. I believe that this policy will inaugurate a new era of industrial 
and commercial prosperity for the whole nation. It will secure equitable 
conditions for the consuming public, and at the same time accord to all 
legitimate business adequate protection and the fullest measure of develop- 
ment. It will give us a new start for the next one hundred years. We need 
broader markets and more commerce; and the business experience of the 
country now points to the policy of a lower tariff and reciprocity as the 
agency most surely conducive to our national progress. Massachusetts by 
its verdict in the election has approved these methods, and should, through 
the Legislature, memorialize Congress to work for them." 

" We shall establish reciprocity with Canada as soon as this principle is 
approached in its proper relation to general tariff reduction, and in a manner 
which the common sense of both peoples shall approve. Reciprocal trade 
relations with other countries, not only on the North and South American 
continents, but also throughout the rest of the world are equally necessary." 

"Our wisest statesmen of both parties, since the foundation of our gov- 
ernment, have advocated this policy ; and it never appealed more strongly at 
any time to the enlightened intelligence of the country than today." 

H. 



* -.* 



•••■ %£r 



fell 

j/-.' 

I 

,2S 



w? 






JHBfi 




» 






x, 1 



v. 



V 









ml*' V 



a 



*^ ft? 

:' ■• , ; i 






W 

»-* 
to 

CO 

to 

« 
H 

CO 

to 

o 

X 

J* 
to 

to 

CO 

o 

w 

W 
H 



1 J r . 



- 

- 



*.:*v -.- - v-~ - 



a 






THE MOSELEY HOMESTEAD 

WESTFIELD, MASS. 



By Louis M. Dewey 



Of all the old mansion houses in Westfield none are known to be older than 
the back part of the Moseley homestead on Main street, east corner of 
Meadow. 

When the town was laid out in 1667 a highway was run "west from the 
Indian Fort" near the confluence of the two rivers. During colonial times 
this way was known as the ''great street" ; since 1830 as Main street. 

On the north side of this street lies the original home-lot granted Joseph 
Whiting who soon opened the first store in town. He had for a wife, Mary, 
daughter of Major John Pynchon of Springfield who was the head of every- 
thing commercial, military, civil and social in his day. So Whiting became 
his agent in the new settlement at Waranoco, soon to become the town of 
Westfield, 1669. 

When Rev. Edward Taylor came in 1671 to become first minister of the 
church to be organized, he settled in quarters at Mr. Whiting's until the min- 
ister's house was built. 

The troublous times occasioned by King Phillip's War made Mr. Whiting 
long for the more secure home he had left in Hartford, so he moved back 
there and sold his property in Westfield, August, 1677, to John Mosely of 
Windsor, Conn. The latter became active in military and town affairs as 
many of his descendants have continued to be. 

In 1719 when the town found it necessary to build a new meeting house, 
it was finally decided to place it on "the knowl on Capt. Manderley's lot on 



212 THE MOSELEY HOMESTEAD 

the North side ye way, behind his housing." The mansion house has been 
occupied by seven successive generations as follows: — John, Joseph, David, 
David, Jeremiah, George H., Fred F. Moseley. David Mosely, senior, was ap- 
pointed by King George II in June, 1749, a Magistrate of (old) Hampshire 
County. His son David became an active patriot in the Revolutionary 
struggle, being a member of the committee of correspondence and safety in 
1775, and captain of a company in Hampshire county regiment in 1777, which 
aided in the capture of Burgoyne and his army at Saratoga, N. Y. Local 
tories were confined under guard in this old house. 

Time and modern improvements have made inroads upon the appearance 
of this old mansion. Some fifty or sixty years ago the old doors and windows, 
with their antique carvings, had become decayed, and were replaced with 
new ones without the old knockers of brass. Partitions of carved panels, 
corner cupboards and window seats were removed. The huge central chim- 
ney with wide fire-places and ovens, was taken out to make more room for a 
hall-way through the center of the house. 

Fourteen brides have been married in "the best room" on the west side 
of the house and gone out into the world's activities as the wives of mission- 
aries, doctors, lawyers and others. 



MASSACHUSETTS IN LITERATURE 



By Charles A. Flagg 



Recent titles of a historical or descriptive character dealing with the state or its localities. The list in- 
cludes no t only books and pamphlets, but articles wherever round: in neriodicals. society publications, etc. 

While it primarily calls attention to material appearing since the last issue of this magazine, frequently 
titles are included which had been overlooked in previous numbers. 



GENERAL. 

Benton. Warning out in New England. 
By J. H. Benton. Boston, W. B. Clarke 
Company, 1911. 131 p. 

An explanation of this legal'custom among our 
fathers. Lists of local "Warnings" are estimated as 
valuable genealogical sources. 

Daughters. Mass. state conference, D. A. 
R. Boston, Mar. 15, and Worcester, Mav 
23, 1911. By H. Josephine Hayward, 
assistant state historian. (American 
monthly magazine, June, Sept., 1911. v. 
38, p. 323-324; v. 39, p. 138-139.) 

Dennis. The writing habit in New Eng- 
land. By A. W. Dennis. (Magazine of 
history, Apr., 1911. v. 13, p. 202-207.) 
Also published as preface of "New England 
history . . . List of Americana pertaining to New 
England". Published by the Salem Press Co., 1911. 

Gardner. Col. Ruggles Woodb dge's 
regiment, 1775. By F.A.Gardner. (Massa- 
chusetts magazine, Jan.-Apr., 1911. v. 4, 
p. 29-42, 82-95.) 

State ship Tartar. By F. A. Gardner. 

(Massachusetts magazine, Jan. 1911. v. 
4, p. 43-48.) 

State sloop Winthrop. By F. A. 

Gardner. (Massachusetts magazine, Apr., 
1911. v. 4, p. 110-116.) 

Hilkey. Legal development in colonial 
Mass. 1630-1686. Bv C. J. Hilkev. New 
York, 1910. 148 p. (Studies in history, 
economics and public law . . Co- 
lumbia University, v. 37, no. 2.) 

Lincoln. The manuscript collections of 
the American Antiquarian Society. By 
C. H. Lincoln. (Bibliographical Society 
of America. Papers 1909. v. 4, p. 59- 
72.) 

List. List of death notices of Revo- 
lutionary soldiers in the "Olive branch" 



published in Boston 1836 and 1S37. 
(American monthlv magazine, June, 
1911. v. 38, p. 311.) 

Long. The salt marshes of the Mass. 
coast. By H. F. Long. (Topsneld His- 
torical Society. Historical collections, 

1910. v. 15, p. 105-123.) 

Mass. [Circular No. 24] Thirteenth Mass. 
regiment. Our 50th anniversary. [Bos- 
ton, 1911.] 52 p. 
Chas. E. Davis, Jr., Secretary. 

Roe. The Fifth regiment, Mass. volunteer 
infantrv in its three tours of dutv 1861, 
1862-63, 1864. By A. S. Roe. Boston, 
Fifth Regiment Veteran Association, 

1911. 510 p. 

Titus. The last survivors of the War for 
independence. By Rev. A. Titus. (Ameri- 
can monthlv magazine, Mar.-Aug., 1911. 
v. 38, p. 252-253, 310-311; v. 39, p. 15- 
16, 88-91.) 

1000 names, with dates of decease, chiefly from 
newspapers. Nearly all the deaths occurred after 
1S30, and a large proportion in Mass. 

Parts 10-13, covering Lawrence — Miller, Mer- 
ritt — Murch, Packard — Pierce, Pike — Sherman, re- 
spectively. Began in May, 1910. v. 36, p. 536. 

Wickham. Historic churches of Mass. By 
Jennette A. Wickham. (American month- 
lv magazine, Sept. 1911. v. 39, p. 127- 
132.) 

Sketches of churches in Boston, Plymouth, 
Dedham, Lexington, Quincy, Roxbury, Marblehead, 
Longmeadow, Salem, Brookrield and DorcLester. 

LOCAL 

Acton. James Haywood, born April 4, 

1750, killed in the battle of Lexington, 

April 19, 1775. [By W. F. Adams.] 

Springfield, Privately printed, 1911. 58 p. 

Acton in the Revolution, Capt. Isaac_ Davis's 

company and the Davis monument, p. 39-54. 



214 



THE MASSACHUSETTS MAGAZINE 



Boston. A volume of records relating to 
the early history of Boston, containing 
the Minutes of the Selectmen's meetings 
from Sept., 1, 1818 to Apr., 24, 1S22, 
Boston, City of Boston printing depart- 
ment, 1909. 293 p. 
Forming the 39th volume of the series of Rec- 
ord relating to the early history of Boston, issued 
from the Citv re^istrar*s office (formerly called Rec- 
ord commissioners' reports). 

This is the 12th and concluding volume of 
Selectmen's minutes, 1701-1822. 

■ Boston Tea Party chapter, D. A. R., 

Boston. (American monthly magazine, 
May, 1911. v. 38, p. 269.) 

The General Benjamin Lincoln chap- 
ter, D. A. R., East Boston. By Hannah 
L. Bartley, historian. (American monthly 
magazine, Aug., 1911. v. 39, p. 97.) 

John Paul Jones chapter, D. A. R., 

Boston. (American monthly magazine, 
June, 1911. v. 38, p. 318.) 

Papers relating to the Revolutionary- 
war. Boston documents 1768. (Magazine 
of history, Aug., 1910. v. 12, p. 81-96.) 

Extracts from the diarv of Josiah 

Williston of Boston, 1808-1814. (Xew 
England historical and genealogical 
register, Oct., 1911. v. 65, p. 366-371.) 

Brewster see Harwich. 

Cambridge. A church's jubilee. By 
W. J. Mann. (Magazine of history, Aug., 
1911. v. 13, p. 357-359.) 
275th anniversary of the First Church, 

Cambridge. 

The real Cambridge of to-day. By 

F. W. Norris. (Xew England magazine, 
Apr., 1911. v. 44, p. 225 238.) 

Dunstable. Early generations of the 
.founders of Dunstable; thirty families. 
By E. S. Stearns. Boston, G. E. Littleneld, 
1911. 103 p. 

East Boston see Boston. 

Fall River. Quequechan chapter, D.A.R. 
By Ada H. Meddaugh, historian. (Ameri- 
can monthly magazine, Sept. 1911. v. 39, 
•p. 126.) 

Hampshire County. Col. Ruggles Wood- 
bridge's regiment, 1775. By F. A. 
Gardner. (Massachusetts magazine, Jan. - 
Apr., 1911. v. 4, p. 29-42, 82-95.) 
6 of the 10 companies were raised in the Con- 
necticut Valley (old Hampshire County). 

Harwich. Records of the Brewster 
Congregational church, Brewster, Mass., 



1700-1792. Privately printed. [Boston, 
The Merrymount press] 1911. 169 p. 
25 copies printed. 

This was the 1st or North parish of Harwich; 
not incorporated as the town of Brewster till 1 - , 

Not identical with the copy or this church 'l 
records now appearing serially in the "Mayfl Lower 
descendant." 

Hingham. Hingham; a story of its earlv 
settlement and life, its ancient landmarks, 
its historic sites and building-. Published 
by Old Colony Chapter, D.A.R. 1911. 
123 p. 

Lexington. Lexington Historical Society 
accepts Munroe tavern. | Magazine of 
history, Aug., 1911. v. 13, p. 305.) 

Lowell. The Lowell magazine, v. I, no. 
1-11, Mar., 19, 1909-June, 1910. Lowell, 
The Lowell Board of Trade, 1909-10. 
Discontinued. 

Medford. Sarah Bradlee-Fulton chapter, 
D. A. R. By Eliza M. Gill, corresponding 
secretary. (American monthly magazine, 
Sept., 1911.' v. 39, p. 125-126.) 

Middlesex County. A week on the Con- 
cord and Merrimac rivers. Bv H. D. 
Thoreau. Xew York, T. Y. Crowell Co., 
[1911.] 492 p. 
"" First edition 1S49. 

Nantucket. Jethro Coffin's home, "the 
oldest house in Nantucket" 1686-1910. 
By R. A. Douglas-Lithgow. (Massa- 
chusetts magazine, Jan., 1911. v. 4, p. 23- 
28.) 

The g'acier's gift, with 14 illustrations. 

By Eva C. G. Folger., New Haven, Conn. 
The Tut tie, Morehouse and Taylor 
company, 1911. 145 p. 

Natick. The Drury death book. Com- 
municated by T. W. Baldwin. (New 
England historical and genealogical regis- 
ter, Oct , 1911. v. 65, p. 356-366.) 
List of deaths in Natick and vicinity 1757- 1S03. 

Northbridge. The Abignil Batcheller 
chapter, D. A. R., Whitinsviile. By 
Anna C. Paine, historian. (American 
monthly magazine, Aug., 1911. v. 39, p. 
97.) 

Oxford. General Ebenezer Learned chap- 
ter, D. A. R. By Abby B. Shute, his- 
torian. (American monthly magazine, 
Aug., 1911. v. 39, p. 97-98.) 

Plymouth. The old Warren house at 
Plymouth. By F. R. Stoddard, Jr. 
(Massachusetts 'magazine, Apr., 1911. v. 
4, p. 105-109.) 



RECENT MAGAZINE ARTICLES 



215 



Quincy. The Dorothy Quincy homestead, 
Quincy. By A. B. Cushin£. (Massa- 
chusetts magazine, Apr., 1911. v. 4, p. 
96-98.) 

Salem. A financial tale of two cities: a 
comparison between Exeter, England 
and Salem, Mass., showing how much we 
have to learn about city government. 
By N. M. Hall. (World's work, Sept., 
1910. v. 20, p. 13363-13369.) 

Suffolk County. Shoreline changes in 
the Winthrop area, Mass. By G. R. 
Roorbach. (The Bulletin of the Geo- 
graphical Societv of Philadelphia. Oct., 
1910. v. 8, p. 172-190.) 

Taunton. The Taunton pageant. By 
Flynn Wavne. (National magazine, 
Sept., 1911/ v. 34, p. 735-738.) 

Tisbury. Sea Coast Defence chapter, 
D. A. R., Vineyard Haven. (American 
monthly magazine, May, 1911. v. 38, 
p. 259.) 

Topsfield. Newspaper item relating to 
Topsfield. Copied from Salem news- 
papers by G. F. Dow. (The historical 
collections of the Topsfield Historical 
Society, 1910. v. 15, p. 125-156.) 

Part 5 (1829-1835); earlier parts in v. 3,5, 10 
and. 12. 

The early records of the town of Tops- 
field. (The historical collections of the 
Topsfield Historical Society, 1910. v. 15, 



p. 41-104.) 
Part 4, (1710-1723); earlier parts in v. 2. 3 and 

Vital statistics of Topsfield for the 

year 1909. (The historical collections of 
the Topsfield Historical Society, 1910. 
v. 15, p. 157-159.) 

These vital records have been issued since 1900 
at the end of the volumes of Historical collections. 

The historical collections of the 

Topsfield Historical Societv. Vol. XV. 

1910. Topsfield, 1910. 160 p. 
Uxbridge. Deborah Wheelock chapter, 

D. A. R. By Minnie A. Story, historian. 
(American monthly magazine. May- June, 

1911. v. 38, p. 257, 319-320.) 
Vineyard Haven see Tisbury. 

Ware. History of Ware, Mass. By Arthur 
Chase. Cambridge, The University 
press, 1911. 294 p. 

Whitinsville see Northbridge. 

Worcester. A belated memorial — a 
tablet to Samuel Loverson of Worcester, 
taken captive by Indians 1695. (Maga- 
zine of historv, Dec. 1910. v. 12, p. 342- 
343.) 
Loverson was with Mrs. Dustin and Mrs. XefT at 

the time of their celebrated escape from Indian 

captivity 

[Circular of the Worcester Society of 

Antiquity.] Worcester, Mass., May 20, 
1911. [31 p. 



[This is the ninth instalment of a series of articles on Massachusetts Pioneers to other states, to be 
published by The Massachusetts Magazine.] 

MASSACHUSETTS PIONEERS. 
MICHIGAN SERIES. 



By Charles A. Flagg 



Besides the abbreviations of book titles, (explained 
July, 19J8 issues) the following are used: b. for born; d. 

Jackson, Abigail M., b. Newton Falls, 1814; 
m. 1834, Luther Haskins of Mich. Lena- 
wee Hist. II, 217. 

Eliza, b. Salem, 1813; m. 1832, John 

B. Griswold of Mich. Saginaw Hist., 824. 

Hannah, b. Hampshire Co., m. 1840? 

Luther Clapp of Mich. Gratiot, 362. 



Mary, b. Newton, 1755 ;m. 1775, Abner 

Hall of Mass., Vt. and Mich. Lenawee 
Hist. I, 418; Lenawee Port., 253. 

Mary B., m. 1S02, Thomas Manlev of 

Vt. Macomb Hist., 734. 

William, set. N.Y., 1830? Conn. Gra- 
tiot, 373. 

James, Luther, b. Goshen, 1803; set. Mich., 
1835. Washtenaw Hist., 501, S14. 

Sophia, b. Goshen, 1792; m. 1815. 

Thomas Sears of Mass., N. Y. and Mich. 

Washtenaw Hist., 818; Washtenaw Port., 

228. 
Janes, Isabella of North field; m. 1822, 

John Howland of X. Y. and Mich. Wash- 
tenaw Hist., 1211. 
Jenison, Charles O., b. Boston, 1843; set, 

Wis. 1877, Mich. 1882. Ionia Port., 735. 
Jenkins, Ella, b. Berkshire Co.; m. I860- 

Stephen R. Craniall of N. Y. and Mich- 

Mecosta, 491. 

Jenks, Ellen M., b. Belchertown, 1825; m. 
1853, Henry P. Howe of Mich. Lena- 
wee Hist. II, 441. 

Erastus S., b. Cheshire, 1814; set. 

Mich. 1844. Ionia Hist., 291. 

Laban, set. N. Y., Mich., 1821, d. 

1829. Oakland Hist., 319. 



on pages 76, 77. 78 and 79 of April, and page 130 of 
for died; m. for married; set. for settled in. 

Jenxey, Benjamin, set. O., 1835? Ionia 
Port., 377. 

Ebenezer, b. New Bedford; set. Vt., 

1790? Macomb Hist., 731. 
James, set. N. Y., 1840? Washtenaw 



Hist., 856. 

William, b. Middlesex Co., 1812; set. 

Mich., 1843. Macomb Hist., 591. 

Jennings, Henry, b. New Bedford, or near 
Boston, 1777; set. N. Y., 1799. Lena- 
wee Hist. II, 154; Lenawee Port., 534. 

Isaac, set. Mich., 1S37. Clinton Past. 

503; Shiawassee, 527. 

Stephen, set. N. Y., Mich., 1843. 

Genesee Hist., 311. 

Zera, set. N. Y., 1815? Lenawee 

Port., 330. 

Jennison, Pollv. m. 1800? Daniel Brown of 
Vt. and N. Y. Washtenaw Hist., 969; 
Washtenaw Port., 255. 

William, b. Boston, 1S0O? set. N. Y., 

Pa., La. Saginaw Port., 1036. 

William, b. Boston 1826; set. Mich., 

1853. Wayne Chron., 399. 

Jewell, Silas T., set. O., d. 1869. Gratiot, 

225. 
Jewett, Betsey, b. Littleton, 1804; m. 

Daniel Chat'terton of Mich. Isabella, 

204. 
Eleazer, b. 1799; set. Mich., 1826. 

Saginaw Hist., 20y. 

Joseph, b. Dudlev, 1S03; set. N. Y., 

1828, Mich., 1S36. St. Joseph, facing 
134. 



MICHIGAN PIONEERS 



21' 



Jipson, Webster, set. N. Y., 1800? Kent, 

788. 
Johnson, Azubah, b. Bridgewater. 1797; 

m. Chester Cooley of N. Y. and Mich. 

Kalamazoo Port., SS8. 

Daniel set. N. Y., 1800? Calhoun 

109. 

Elbridge N. set. Mich., 1834. Gene- 
see Hist., 241. 

Electa, m. Amasa Preston of O. and 

Mich, and d. 1863. Berrien Hist., 301. 

Lucy, b. Worcester Co., 1797; m. 

Samuel Stevens of Mass. and Mich. 
Hillsdale Hist., 229. 

Lutheria, b. 1S15? m. Z. M. Marsh of 

N. Y. and Mich. Ingham Port., 602. 

Mary, b. Worcester Co., 1S03; m- 

Samuel Stevens of Mass. and Mich. 
Hillsdale Hist., 229. 

Norman, set. N. Y., 1840? Kent, 



1339. 

— Obadiah. b. 



1735; set. Conn. Ing- 
ham Port., 312. 

Stephen O., b. Westfield, 1847; set. 

N. Y., Mich., 1884. Wayne Land., 737. 

Rev. W. W., b. Winstown? 1817; set. 

Mich., 1835. Kent, 263. 

William A., b. Ashby, 1859; set- 

Mich., 1880? Grand Rapids City, 252- 

William W., b. Williamstown, 1786; 

set. N. Y. Isabella, 401. 
Jones, -Benaiah, Jr., b. Berkshire Co ; set- 

O , 1810? Mich., 1S28. Jackson Port., 

429. 

David S., b. Wisdom, Franklin Co., 

1844; set. Mich., 1S63. Jackson Port., 
208. 

■ Elisha of Berkshire Co., set. O., 1825. 

St. Clair, 579. 
Jonathan of Leverett, set. N. Y., 1790. 

Allegan Hist., 390. 

Joseph P., b. 1834; set. O., 1837. 

Mich., 1857. Hillsdale Hist., 218. 

* Mrs. Lois (wife of Benaiah), b. Peru, 

1790. Hillsdale Hist., 125. 

Polly, m. 1S25? Alexander Barrett of 

Mich. Ionia Port., 461. 

S. A., b. Berkshire Co., 1817; set. O., 

1835, Mich., 1837. St. Ciair, 579. 

Sullivan, set. X. Y., 1830? d. 1880. 

Newaygo, 193. 



Joslin, Frederick W., b. Hubbardston, 
1845; set. Ind., Mich., 1872. Mecosta, 
273. 

John. set. X. Y, 1S10' Mich., 1835. 

Washtenaw Hist., 745. 

Joy, David, b. Rehoboth, 1724; set. Vt., 

N. Y. Jackson Hist., 1091. 
Joyce. Angie C, b. Duxb.iry, 1857; m. 

1S79, George E. Wilde of M'ich. Xorth- 

ern P., 206. 
Judd, Elliott E., b. S. Hadlev, 1841; set. 

Mich., 1852. Kent, 272, 1054. 

George E , b. S. Hadlev, 1S38; set. 

Mich., 1852. Kent, 1054. ' 

John E., b. 1S3S; set. Mich. Kent, 

272. 

Levi, b. S. Had'ev, 1795; set. X. Y., 

1820? Saginaw Port., 283. 

Rhoda, b. Berkshire Co., m. 1810? 

Samuel Scott of X. Y. Xewaygo, 277. 

Samuel, b.S. Hadlev, 1806; set. Mich., 

1852. Kent. 264, 1053. 

Kaple, John H, b. Tyringham, 1817; set. 
Mich., 1838. Wayne Land., appendix 55. 

Kauffer, Ha 1 .e P., b. Methuen 1840; set. 

Mich. Kalamazoo Port., 867. 
Keeney Jonathan B., b. 1S15; set. Mich., 

1837. Clinton Past, 346. 
Keith, Mary G., m. 1820? William R. 

DeLand of Mass. and Mich. Saginaw 

Hist., 465. 

Olivia M., b. Worcester Co., 1815; m« 

1S39, Edwin Adams. Jackson Hist., 
848. 

Kelley, Abigail, m. 1820? Abiel Densmore 
of Me. and Mich. Jackson Hist., S85. 

John W., b. Cape Cod 176S; set. Me., 

1800? Mich., 1839. Lenawee Port , 1216. 

Libni, b. Dennis, 1799; set. Me ,X.Y., 

1824, Mich., 1836. Lenawee Hist. I, 177. 

Ruth, b. 176S; m. Xathan Harkness 

of X. Y. Lenawee Hist. II, 461; Lena- 
wee Port., 612. 

Kellogg, Anna, b. Berkshire Co., m. 1810? 
Ephraim Towner of X. Y. Washtenaw 
Port., 625. 

Catharine M.. b. Sheffield, 180S; m. 

Job Whitney of Mich. Kent, 634. 

Ebenezcr W., b. Hadlev, 1815; set. 

Mich., 1839. Gratiot, 450. 



gfc 



218 



THE MASSACHUSETTS MAGAZINE 



Kellogg, Hosmer, of Sheffield, b. 1815? 

set. Mich., Monroe, 147. 
Joseph, b. 1778; set. N.Y. Kalamazoo 

Port., 574. 
Nathaniel, set. N. Y., 1820? Jackson 

Hist., 657. 
Kelsey, Elisha, b. Sheffield; set. Conn., 

Wis. Hillsdale Port., 660. 
Kemp, Joseph, b. Shelburne. 1813; set. 

•N. Y., 1828, Mich., 1845. Northern P., 

473. 
Kendall, Adelaide, m. 1850, Cornelius 

Selfridge of N. Y. and Mich. Oakland 

Port., 784. 
Eleanor, b. Worcester Co., m. 1808? 

Jonas Bennett of N. Y. Branch Port., 

310. 
George, b. Greenfield, 1813, set. N.Y., 

1831, O. 1833. Mich. 1S40. Grand Rapids 

Lowell, 6S2; Kent. 1054. 
Henry D., b. Greenfield; 1815; set. O. 

1839. N. Y. 1844, Mich. 1879. Grand 
Rapids Lowell, 709. 

John, b. Greenfield, 1825; set. N. Y. 

1831, O. 1833, Mich. 1847. Grand Rap- 
ids Lowell, 653; Kent, 261. 

Mary, b. Westminster, 1768; m. David 

McGee of N.Y. and Mich. Jackson Port., 
812. 

Kenfield, Erastus of Belchertown, b. 1801 ; 
set. O. 1S34. Ailegan Hist., 252; Kala- 
mazoo Port., 513. 

William S., b. Belchertown, 1831; 

set. O., 1834?, Mich., 1855. Allegan 
Hist., 252; Allegan Twent., 328; Kala- 
mazoo Port, 513. 

Kennedy, Chauncy, b. 1818; set. Mich. 

1840. Cass Hist., 144; Cass Twent. 353. 
Kenny, Munnis, set.. Mich. Washtenaw 

Hist., 671. 
Kent, Ann, m. Luther Hanchett of N. Y., 

O. and Mich. Hillsdale Port, 319. 
Lydia, m. 1800? William Wright of 

N. H. and N. Y. Genesee Port, 897. 
Mariner, of Newburvport: b. 1757; 

set. N. H., 1798. Lenawee Hist. I, 213; 

Lenawee Port., 298. 
Richard, b. Ne.vburyport, 1786; set. 

N.H., 1798, Mich. 1835. Lenawee Hist. 

I., 213; Lena.vee Port., 298, 655. 
Rufus, b. Hampshire Co. 1820; set. 

Penn., 1841, Mich., 1856. Mecosta, 381. 



Kerr, WilPam \V., b. Cambridge. 1843; 

set. Canada, 1S44, Mich. Sanilac, 191. 

Kerwin, James, set. Mich., 18G6. Lake 

Huron, 173. 
Ketcham, Betsev, b. Clarksburg, 1798; m. 

1815, William W. McLoath of X. Y. and 

Mich. Lenawee Hist. 1, 193. 

Keyes, Eli, b. 1S08; set. O., Mich., 1837. 

Branch Port, 501. 
George, b. Springfield, 1830; set. Mich., 

1837. Branch Port, 501. 

James, b. Newburyport, 17S9; ?et. 

N. Y.. 1817. Lenawee Port., 1205. 

Sarah B.,b. Townsend, 1813; m. 1831, 

Edwin D. Crane of N. Y. and Mich. 
Lenawee Port., 1205. 
Keys, Pardon, set. N. Y., 1825? Wash- 
tenaw Hist., 815. 
Kidder, Alfred, b. Boston, 1840; set. Mich., 

1860? Upper P., 431. 
Kilbourn, David, set. N.Y.,Mich., 1836. 

Branch Twent., 449. 
Kilburn, Elijah, b. Great Barrington, 

1813; set. Penn. Lenawee Port., 642. 
Kimball Daniel, b. Haverhill, 1779; set. 

N. H., 180J;Mich., 1851. Lenawee Hist. 

I, 348. 
Darius, set. N.H., Penn., N.Y., Mich., 

1846. Lenawee Port., 779 
Kimberly, Silas, b. Ashfield. 1814; set. 

Mich., 1828. Ionia Port., 569. 
Kindle, Do'lv, m. 1780? James Stuart of 

N. Y. Genesee Port., 622. 
King, Amos, b. near Boston; Revolution- 
ary soldier, set. N. Y. Hillsdale Port., 467. 
Asabel, b. 1781; set. N. Y., Mich., 

1837. Jackson Hist., 199. 
Augusta A., of Taunton; m. 1S60? 

U. W. Lawton of Mich. Jackson Hist., 

603. 
David, set. N. Y., 1820? Clinton 

Port., 538. 
David, b. 1786; set. N. Y. Allegan 

Hist., 454. 
Eunice, m. 1810? Smith Bailev of 

N. Y. Kent, 1373. 
George, b. Hampshire Co., 1800; set. 

N. Y., 1802, Mich., 1831. Washtenaw 

Hist., 1401. 
Henry, d. Ohio, 1862. Berrien Port., 

672. 



MICHIGAN PIONEERS 



219 



James, set. N. Y., 1815? Mich., 1845. 

{ Kent, 1221. 

Polly, m. 1800? Martin Culver of 

Mass., N. Y. snd Mich. Jackson Port., 

296. 
Simon, set. N. Y., 1800? Jackson 

Port., 309. 
Kingman, Malaney, m. 1820? Dexter 

Mitchell of N. Y. and Mich. Northern 

M., 321. 
Kingsbury, Asa, set. Mich., 1860? Jackson 

Port., 406. 
Asa, b. Newton, 1S06; set. O., 1830, 

Mich., 1833 or 6. Cass Hist., 144. facing 

160; Cass Rogers, 328; Cass Twent., 

70,552,644. 

Char'es, b. Norfolk Co., 1812; set. 

Me., Mich., 1835 or 7. Cass Hist., 179; 

Cass Twent., 71. 
Elijah, b. Franklin Co. 1796; set. 

Mich., 1839. Cass Twent., 71. 
Kingsley, Charles R., b. Bernardston, 

1831; set. Mich., 1839. Beirien Port, 

426; Cass Twent., 71. 
Elijah, b. Franklin Co., 1796; set. 

Mich., 183S. Berrien Port., 426; Cass 

Hist., 266. 
Esther, b. Becket; m. 1803, David 

Frary of O. and Mich. Lenawee Hist. 

II, 135. 

George W., set. Mich., 1833. Berrien 



Twent., 715. 
LydiaC.b. Swansea, 1822; m. 1841, 

Simeon C. Wilson of Mich. Berrien 

Twent., 468. 
Moses, b. Brighton, 1810; set. Mich., 

1830. St. Clair, 121. 
Kinney, Amos L., set. Canada, Mich., 

1855. Genesee Port., 443. 
Hutchins, . b. 1789; set. Penn., O. 

Branca Port., 610. 
John S., b. Alford, 1827; set. N. Y., 

O., Mich. Lenawee Port., 386. 
Thomas, set. N. Y., 1835? Lenawee 



Port. 386. 
Kirby, Gecrge, b. Berkshire Co., 1806; 

set. Mich., 1838. Wayne Chron., 379. 
Lydia, m. 1830? Simon Jones of N. Y., 

O. and Mich. Gratiot, 423. 
Sarah, m. 1790? Benjamin Estes of 

Maine and N. Y. Lenawee Port. 1216. 



Thankful, m. 1S30 5 Abraham T. Huff 

of N. Y. and O. Gratiot, 521. 

Kittredge, Albina S., m. 1840? Charles 
W. Rich of Me. and O. Osceola, L96. 

Kxapp, Brundage. set. O., 1830? Mecosta, 
513. 



Chauncey, b. 1798; set. Mich., 1830. 

Washtenaw Hist., 10S5. 

Ebenezer, set. N. Y., 1810? Mich. 

Kalamazoo Port., 541. 

Rachel, m. 1820? Edmund W. Mead 

of N. Y. and O. Newaygo, 476. 

Kneeland, Clara, m. at Sandisfield, 1811, 
Sparrow Snow of Mass. and. O. De- 
troit 1.69; Wayne Land., 820. 

Knight, Stephen H., b. Salem. 1802: set. 
Mich., 18S9. Wayne Land., 74fc. 

William, b. Northampton, 1806 or 7; 

set. N. J., 1827, Mich., 1834. Lenawee 
Hist. I, 336; Lenawee Illus., 123, 439; 
Lenawee Port., 433. 

Knowlton. Ephraim A., b. Cape Ann, 
1813; set. Vt., O., Mich., 1846. Bran.h 
Port., 470; Branch Twent., 249. 

— ■ — William, b. Wenham; set. Vt., 1S15, 
O. Branch Port.. 470. 

Knox, Elijah, b. Blandford, 1773; set. 
N. Y. Kalamazoo Port., 983. 

Kriger, Michael, set. Ind., 1835? Ne- 
w r aygo, 257. 

Ladd, John, b. 1774; set. N. Y., 1S00? 
Lenawee Port., 519. 

John, b. Cheshire, 1786; set. N. Y., 

1816. Lenawee Hist. I, 413. 



1820 i 



Lena wee 



John, set. N. 

Port., 1038. 
Laird, Jonas, b. 1792; set. N. Y. Hillsdale 

Port., 935. 
Lamb, Nahum, b Charlton, 1794; set. N.Y., 

1815? Mich. 1S34. Lenawee Hist. I, 10S. 

Otis, b. Greenville, 1790; se!. Canada 

1810, N. Y. 1816. Mxh. 1823. Macomb 
Hist., 831; Macomb Past, 280. 

Landman, William J., b. Boston, 1873 ; set. 
Mich. Grand Rapids Lowell, 7S9. 

Landox, George, b. Sheffield, 1795; set. 
Mich. 1831. Monroe, 431. 

Lane, Bereah H., b. Enfield, 1800; set. 
Mich. 1834. Bean Creek, 35; Lenawee 
Port., 109S. 



220 



THE MASSACHUSETTS MAGAZINE 



- Irene, b. Chesterfield, 1774; m David 

Foote of N.Y. and 111. Genesee Port. ,907. 

Nathaniel, of Enfield; set. Mich. 1834. 

Bean Creek, 30; Lenawee Port., 1098. 

Nathaniel, b. Enfield, 1830; set. Mich. 

1834. Lenawee Port., 1098. 
Lang, Henry, b. 1820; set, Mich. 1844. 

Cass Hist., 145. 
Oscar, b. 1S16; set. Mich. 1S44. Cass 

Hist., 145. 
Langdqn, Reuben, b. Tvringham, 1777; 

set. N. Y. 1795? Lenawee Hist. II, 339. 

Langley, S. G., set. Mich. 1832. Berrien 
Twent., 178. 

Lapham, Elizabeth, m. 1780? Gilbert How- 
land of Mass. and N. Y. Hillsdale Port., 
343. 

Elizabeth M., b. Hancock 1822; m. 

Samuel Jones of Mich. Oakland Port., 
789. 

-Joshua, b. 177S; set. Mich. 1830? 

Oakland Biog., 183; Oakland Port., 789. 

Larned, Charles, b. Pittsfield; graduated 

at Williams College 1806, set. Mich. 1815? 

Wayne Chron., 323. 
Cynthia, b. Springfield; m. 1830? 

James Grant of N.Y. and Mich. Macomb 

Hist., 729, 
Lathrop, Charles A., b. W. Springfield, 

1816; set. Mich. Macomb Hist., 703. 
Edward, b. W. Springfield; set. Mich.; 

d. 1833. Macomb Hist., 703. 
Freeman, b. Hawley, 1837; set. Mich. 

186S. Kent, 1064. 
. Joseph, b. W. Springfield, 1834; set. 

Mich. 1836. Wayne Land., 749. 
Seth, b. W.Springfield.lSlS; set. Mich. 

1837. Macomb Hist., 799. 
Solomon, set. Mich. 1836. Wayne 

Land., 749. 
Law, Levi J., b. Salem 1854; set. Mich. 

1881. Northern M., 123. 
Lawrence, Calvin, b. 1814; set. N. Y. 

1840, Mich. 1848. Lenawee Port., 764. 



Levi L., b. Hampshire Co., 1783; set. 

N. Y., O., Mich. • Berrien Port., 617. 
Wolcott, b. near Pittsfield, 1786; set. 

Mich. 1816. Monroe, 244. 
Lazell. George, b. 1799; set. Mich. 1825. 
. Washtenaw Hist., 502, 1365. 



Leach, Reliance, b. Bridgewater; m. 17951" 

Noah Turre'd of Mass. and N. Y. Hills- 
dale Port., 612. 
Learned, Edward, b. Roxbury; set. N. Y. 

1810? Huron, 257. 
Lee, Asa, set. O., 1S20? Saginaw Port., 

617. 
Elias, S2t. O. 1811. Macomb Hist., 

831. 
Lucy, b. Amherst; m. IS 15? George 

W. Emerson of Mass. and .Mich. Hills- 
dale Port , S78. 
Lucy, m. 1S35? Henry Morris of Vt. 

Gratiot, 401. 
Mary, b. Concord, 1777; m. 1796, 

Oliver Williams of Mass. and Mich. 

Shiawassee, 158. 
Mason, b. Taunton, 1779; set. N. Y., 

Mich. 1833. Berrien Port., 462; Cass 

Twent , 72. 
Permelia, b. 1804; m. Joel Clark. 

Kalamazoo Port., 466. 
Rebecca, b. Barre, 1780, m. 1S00, 

Benjamin Wing of N. Y. and Mich. 

Washtenaw Hist., 870. 
Rowland H., b. Roxburv, 1805; set. O. 

1811. Macomb Hist., 831. 
Sarah, of Westfield; m. 1721, Daniel 

Hayes of Conn. Lenawee Port., facing 

187. 
Leet, Mary, m. 1820? Joseph Moon of O. 

and Mich. Genesee Hist., 471. 
Legg, Polly, m. 1S10? Ebenz-zer Knapp of 

N. Y. and Mich. Kalamazoo Port., 541. 
Sophronia, b. Orange, 1777; m. 1801, 

Abram Aldrich of N. Y. and Mich. 

Branch Port., 360; Branch Twent., 674. 
Leland, Mary A., m. 1830? Israel E. 

Phelps of N. Y. and Mich. Ionia Port., 

583. 
Lenox, Rosanna, m. 1830? Chauncey D. 

Fox of Mich. Isabella, 186. 
Leonard, Edwin S,b. North Adams, 1835; 

set. Mich. Clinton Past, 42S. 
H. F., b. Plymouth County, 1S48; set. 

Mich. 1867. St. Clair, 758. 
Isaac R., soldier of 1812; set. N. Y. 

Genesee Port., 405. 

Levi, set.O. 1814. Branch Port., 610. 

Rone, m. Hutchins Kinney (b. 17S9) 

of Penn. and O. Branch Port., 610. 



COLONEL SAMUEL GERRISH'S 

REGIMENT 



Colonel Samuel Gerrish's (2nd Essex County) Regiment, Aeril 19, 1775; 
25th Regiment, Provincial Army, April-July, 1771; 
38th Regiment, Army of the United Colonies, July-augi ;st 19, 1775. 
Lieut.-Colonel Loammi Baldwin's 38th Regiment, a. U. C. August ID-December 31, r 



By Frank A. Gardner, M.D. 

The companies composing this regiment were more widely distributed 
than those which made up most of the regiments in the 1775 service. Of 
the ten companies included in this organization, four were from Essex 
County, one combined Essex and Middlesex men, one from Middlesex, one 
from Norfolk County and three from New Hampshire, 

Colonel Samuel Gerrish responded to the Lexington alarm of April 19, 
1775, as commander of the 2nd Essex County Regiment. He had with him 
at least three companies officered as follows: 

Captains First Lieutenants Second Lieutenants 



Eliphalet Spafford John Pingree 

William Rogers Samuel Carr ■ 

Jonathan Poor Moses Ilsley Simeon Hale 

A few days later the regiment was re-organized and became the 25th 
Regiment in the Provincial Army with the following staff officers: 
Colonel Samuel Gerrish, Newbury, entered April 19, 1775. 
Lieut. Colonel Loammi Baldwin, Woburn, entered May 19, 1775. 
Major James Wesson, Brookline, entered May 1, 1775. 
Adjutant Christian Febiger, Newbury, entered April 26, 1775. 
Quartermaster Michael Farley, Ipswich, April 27, 1775. 
Surgeon David Jones, Abington, May 1, 1775. 
Surgeon's Mate, Samuel Blanchard, Boston, June 8, 1775. 

April 30, 1775, Colonel Samuel Gerrish was appointed to take charge of 
the two offices voted to be established "to deliver permits for such persons 
as desire to enter Boston with their effects." (Colonel Henshaw was the 
other officer.) 



222 COLONEL SAMUEL GERRISH'S REGIMENT 

"Colonel Samuel Gerrish having satisfied this committee that his regiment 
is full, we recommend to the Congress that said regiment be commissioned 
accordingly." 

Committee of Safety, May 19, 1775. 

"A return of Companies to whom is given listing orders by Colonel Samuel 
Gerrish : 

Capt. William Rogers Com. effectives not all in 56 

" Jacob Gerrish, — not all in 56 

" Richard Dodge — Com. all in Camp 56 

" Wood " " " " 56 

" Dodge not all in 56 

" Cogswell Com. effectives all in Camp 65 

" Warner all in Camp 57 

" Benjn Perkins all in Camp 74 

" Ezra Lunt all in Camp 63 

" Thomas Mighill not all in 56 

" Nathl Wade not returned — 



595 

Christian Febiger, 

May 26, 1775. Adjutant." 

"To Col. Samuel Gerrish. 

A number of gentlemen have presented a petition to this Congress in be- 
half of themselves and the men they have enlisted, praying that Capt. Moses 
Little and Mr. Isaac Smith may be appointed and commissioned as two of 
the field officers over them. Six of the said petitioners are returned by you 
as Captains, as appears by your return, and the petition has been committed 
to a committee, to hear the petitioners and report to the Congress, and it is 
therefore, 

Ordered, that the said Col. Samuel Gerrish be notified, and he is hereby 
notified, to attend the said committee, at the house of Mr. Learned in Water- 
town, the 3d day of June instant, at eight o'clock in the forenoon. 
Third Provincial Congress June 2, 1775." 

"Resolved, That the petition be so far granted, as that the petitioners be 
directed to apply to the committee of safety, for a recommendation to this 
Congress, to commission Capt. Moses Little as colonel of a regiment in the 
Massachusetts army." 



THE MASSACHUSETTS MAGAZINE 



223 



Of the eleven companies above named the following went into Colonel 
Moses Little's regiment in June : 

Companies commanded by Captains Nathaniel Warner, Benjamin Perkins, 
Jacob Gerrish, Ezra Lunt and Nathaniel Wade. 

The conduct, or rather the inactivity of Colonel Gerrish at the battle of 
Bunker Hill led to his military undoing. His regiment as a whole was not in 
the engagement, but a portion of it under Captain Mighill, marched from 
Cambridge to Ploughed Hill, where the adjutant of the regiment, Christian 
Febiger, who had previously seen military service took command and led 
the detachment to the heights where they arrived in time to be of good 
service. A complaint against Colonel Gerrish was made to General Ward, 
the Commander in Chief, immediately after the battle but he declined to 
notice it on account of the unorganized state of the army and nothing 
further w r as done for some weeks. The statement is made in Force's Amer- 
ican Archives, 4-II-1628, that three members of this regiment were killed 
and five wounded, but only one name appears on the memorial tablets in 
Charlestown, that of Thomas Doyl of Captain Roger's company. 

In the records of the Provincial Congress, under date of June 22, 1775, 
we read: 

"Ordered, that Captain Batchelder, Major Goodwin and Mr Hobart, be a 
Committee to consider the propriety of commissioning the Officers of Colonel 
Gerrish's Regiment." On the same date it was 

"Ordered that Mr Pickering be appointed to make out Commissions to 
the Officers of Colonel Gerrish's Regiment." 

A list of officers at this time (June 22, 1775), is given in the Archives v. 
146, p. 222, as follows: 

"Col. Gerrish, Lt. Col. Loammi Baldwin, Maj. James W r esson. 



Captains 

Richard Dodge 
Barnabas Dodge 
Thomas Cogswell 
Timothy Corey 
Samuel Sprague 
John Baker, Jr. 
Thomas Mighill 
Isaac Sherman 



Lieutenants 

Robert Dodge 
Matthew Fairfield 
Moses Dustin 
Thomas Cummings 
Joseph Chever 
Joseph Pettengill 
Thomas Pike 
Caleb Robinson 
Chris 



Ensigns 



Paul Dodge 
Joseph Knights 
Amos Cogswell 



William Oliver 



ian Febiger, Adjutant, 
Saml Gerrish, Coll." 



224 COLONEL SAMUEL GERRISH'S REGIMENT 

Another list in the same volume in the Archives,, bearing the same date, 
gives in addition to the above named officers, Ensign Jonas Johnson of Cap- 
tain Timothy Corey's Company and Ensign Mark Cressey in Captain Thomas 
Migh ill's Company. 

The various towns represented in the above named companies appear in 
the following list : 

Captains: 

Thomas Mighill, Manchester, Rowley, Ipswich, Fitchburg. 

Samuel Sprague, Reading, Chelsea, &c. 

Joseph Pettengill, Fryeburg, Conway, N. H. 

Isaac Sherman, Exeter, N. H., Brentwood, N. H., and Newton, N. H. 

Barnabas Dodge, Gloucester, Manchester and Wenham. 

John Wood, Woburn, Lexington, &c. 

Richard Dodge, Wenham, Ipswich, Manchester, &c. 

William Rogers, Xewbury, Hollis, N. H. and Bradford. 

Thomas Cogswell, Chester, Candia, Sandow and Plaistow (all N. H.) and 

Bradford. 
Timothy Corey, Brookline, Roxbury, Dedham &c. 

The officers in this regiment not previously commissioned were ordered 
commissioned by vote of the Provincial Congress, June 28, 1775. 

"Two small arms were delivered Col. Samuel Gerrish, for the use of his 
regiment, amounting, as by appraised value, to three pounds, three shillings, 
for which a receipt was taken in the minute book." Committee of Safety, 
June 28, 1775. 

In a general order dated July 22, 1775, Col. Gerrish's Regiment was 
assigned to Brigadier General Heath's Brigade, Major General Putnam's 
Division, "Said Gerrish's Regiment to furnish the companies for Chelsea, 
Maiden and Medford." Among the companies stationed at Chelsea at this 
time was one commanded by Captain Eleazer Lindsey, and credited to Col. 
Gerrish's Regiment in a return dated July 21, 1775. This company had 
previously been in Colonel Ruggles Woodbridge's Regiment. It was trans- 
ferred to Maiden about this time upon a report being made by Adjutant 
Febiger that the guard at the latter place was insufficient. From the jour- 
nal of Lieutenant Benjamin Crafts we read that on August 6, 1775, floating 
batteries of the British came up Mystic River and landed some regulars who 
set fire to the house near Penny ferry. "One Capt. Lindsey, who was stationed 
there, fled with his company and got before the women and children in his 



THE MASSACHUSETTS MAGAZINE 225 

flight." He was court-martialed and dismissed August 16, 1775, and the 
command of the company given to his First Lieutenant Daniel Galeucia. 
From Colonel Henshaw's Orderly Book we read that "The company late 
under the command of Captain Eleazer Lindsey is to join Colonel Wood- 
bridge's regiment, as that regiment has at present only nine companys." 
Dated August 28, 1775. 

In August, Colonel Gerrish was stationed at Sewall's Point a fortification 
in Brookline, when an attack was made by a floating battery, which he 
made no attempt to repel and was quoted as saying, "The rascals can do 
us no harm, and it would be a mere waste of powder to fire at them with 
our four-pounders." As it was night and the lights were out the British balls 
did no harm. For his conduct here and at Bunker Hill, Colonel Gerrish was 
arrested, tried by court-martial and found guilty of the charge that "he 
behaved unworthy of an officer, and that he is guilty of a breach of the 
forty-ninth article of the Rules and Regulations of the Massachusetts army. 
The Court therefore sentences and adjudges the said Col. Gerrish to be cash- 
iered and rendered incapable of any further employment in the American 
Army. The General approves the sentence of the Court Martial, and orders 
it to take place." Colonel Swett tells us that "It was thought by the judge 
advocate of the court that he was treated far too severely." 

Lieut. Colonel Loammi Baldwin was given the command of the regiment 
and he served in that capacity through the remainder of the year. Four 
companies of the regiment were stationed at Sewall's Point while the remain- 
der' were in the towns about the Mystic River. 

The strength of the regiment each month through the year was as follows- 



Date 


Com. Oft. 


Staff 


Non Com. 


Rank & File 


Total 


June 9 


29 


4 


. 52 


451 


536 


July 


32 


4 


57 


498 


591 


Aug. 18 


31 


4 


54 


509 


598 


Sept. 23 


32 


4 


57 


513 


606 


Oct. 17 


31 


4 . 


58 


513 


606 


Nov. 18 


31 


4 


58 


507 


600 


Dec. 30 


31 


4 


66 


539 


640 



The officers of this regiment, including those who left to help form Colonel 
Moses Little's Regiment, attained the following rank: six colonels, three 
lieutenant-colonels, six majors, fifteen captains, five first lieutenants, seven 
second lieutenants and two surgeons. At least seventeen saw either French 
war or colonial militia service. 



226 COLONEL SAMUEL GERRISH'S REGIMENT 

COLONEL SAMUEL GERRISH of Newbury, was the son of Colonel 
Joseph Gerrish, a prominent Essex County Officer in the French war. He 
was born in Newbury about 1729. From September S, 1755, to January 4, 
1755-6, he was Captain of a company on the Crown Point expedition. The 
records show that he also served as Captain March 20, 1756, and April 10, 
1757, was Captain in Colonel Joseph Gerrish's Regiment for the invasion of 
Canada. From January 1 to June 10, 1760, he was Captain in Colonel Frye's 
Regiment, at Nova Scotia, and from the last named date to November 30, 
1760, was Major, according to a list of field and star! officers of the 1st and 
2nd Battalions of Brigadier General Timothy Ruggles's Regiment. The 
original muster roll of his company in 1760, is preserved in the Essex Insti- 
tute in the Joshua Coffin Papers, v. II, p. 47. In v. I, p. 100, of the same 
papers, is filed a receipt for 62 guns from his company, April 28, 1759, at Fort 
William. Other documents in the same volume show that he was a selectman 
of Newbury in 1758-59. He was probably the Samuel Gerrish who purchased 
the middle shipyard in Newbury, March 5, 1768, and leased it to Thomas Wood- 
bridge on the same day. As Major Samuel Gerrish he was elected a member 
of the Committee of Correspondence in Newbury, in January, 1773, and as 
Samuel Gerrish, Esq., was a delegate to the Essex County Convention Sep- 
tember 6-7, 1774. Major Samuel Gerrish was appointed September 1, 1774, 
on a committee of Newbury to meet committees from other towns in the 
county. He marched on the Lexington alarm of April 19, 1775, as Colonel 
of the 2nd Essex County Regiment, and when the Provincial Army was 
organized he became Colonel of the 25th Regiment under General Artemas 
Ward. He was officer of the day May 8, receiving his commission May 19, 
1775. His conduct at the Battle of Bunker Hill has been reviewed in the 
historical section of this article. July 21, 1775, he was field officer of the day. 
While stationed at Sewall's Point in Brookline with a portion of his regiment 
in August, 1775, an attack was made upon the fortification by the British 
and his conduct as narrated in the early section of this article was unsatis- 
factory to his superior officers. He was therefore tried by court martial, 
convicted and cashiered August 19, 1775, although the sentence was declared 
by the judge-advocate of the court to have been too severe. His townsmen 
evidently did not lose confidence in him for he was elected with others to 
attend the General Court at Watertown, May 29, 1776. He died in Newbury, 
May 1, 1795, aged 66 years according to the Vital Records of that town. 
(The church record gives it as 6S years.) 



THE MASSACHUSETTS MAGAZINE 227 

LIEUT. COLONEL LOAMMI BALDWIN of Woburn, was the son of 
James and Ruth (Richardson) Baldwin, of Woburn. He was born in that 
town January 10, 1744-5. In February, 1773, he was a member of the Woburn 
Committee of Correspondence, and August 30 and 31, 1774, was a member 
of the Middlesex County Convention. He was 1st Major of Colonel David 
Green's 2nd Middlesex County Regiment, en the Lexington alarm of April 
19, 1775. Major Loammi Baldwin requested the "loan of mathematical 
instruments from the apparatus of Harvard College" to be used in taking 
surveys of the ground about the camp of the Massachusetts Army and posts 
of the British troops. This was June 6, 1775, and on the same day it was 
ordered in the Provincial Congress "That the Reverend President Langdon 
be requested to furnish Major Baldwin out of the College apparatus, with 
such instruments as he stands in need of to perform the publick services 
therein mentioned, he giving his receipt therefor to return the same in good 
order as soon as the said services shall be performed." According to a list in 
the Archives, v. 26, p. Ill, he was engaged as Lieutenant-Colonel in Colonel 
Samuel Gerrish's Regiment, May 19, 1775, but in the Archives, v. 5S, p. 175 ; 
File 22, we read that Major Loammi Baldwin was chosen June 16, 1775, 
"Lt. Col. of Col. Sam'l Gerrish's Reg't by a majority of votes." When Colonel 
Gerrish was cashiered August 19, 1775, Lieut. Colonel Baldwin took command 
of the regiment but retained his rank. Through the year 1776 he was Colonel 
of the 26th Regiment, Continental Army, and saw service with his regiment 
at the siege of Boston, at New York, and in the New Jersey campaign being 
present at the battle of Trenton, December 29, 1776. He was honorably 
discharged from the army in 1777, on account of ill health but was active in 
the cause of the patriots and served on many committees. He was repre- 
sentative to the General Court in 1778, and continued to serve for seven 
years through 17S4. In 1780 he became high sheriff of Middlesex County. 
He was a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and in 17S5 
was given the honorary degree of Master of Arts by Harvard College. He 
was one of the foremost promoters and very active in the construction of the 
Middlesex canal. While surveying land in Wilmington at a place called 
Butters's Row he noticed that the woodpeckers were continually flying to a 
certain tree and upon investigation found that they were attracted by apples 
which he found to be of good flavor. He got scions to graft into his own 
stock and gave many to his friends later when he had found their worth. 
Sewall in his "History of Woburn," tells us that the original tree was blown 
down in the September gale of 1815. These apples first called Butters's 



228 COLONEL SAMUEL GERRISH'S REGIMENT 

were called by others "woodpecker's apples" and finally "Baldwin apples" 
thus making the colonel's name a household word in rural New England. 
He died in Woburn October 20, 1807. 

MAJOR JAMES WESSON of Brookline was the son of Jeremiah and 
Sarah (Bent) Wesson of Sudbury and was born in that town April 2, 1734. 
He was corporal in Captain William Bacon's Company on the Crown Point 
expedition from September 15 to December 16, 1755. From August 16 to 23, 
1757, he was Quartermaster in Captain Jonathan Eaton's detachment of 
Colonel E. Tyng's Regiment, which marched for the relief of Fort William 
Henry. In 1701, advance pay was allowed him as Lieutenant in Colonel 
Nathaniel Thyng's Regiment. From August 18 to December 13, 1761, he 
was Lieutenant in Captain Timothy Hamant's Company. From the last 
named date until November 19, 1762, he was Lieutenant in Captain Simon 
Jefferd's Company. May 1, 1775, he became Major in Colonel Samuel Ger- 
rish's Regiment in the Provincial Army, and served in that rank through 
the year under Colonel Gerrish and Lieut. Colonel Baldwin. Through 1776 
he was Lieut. Colonel of Colonel Loammi Baldwin's 26th Regiment, Conti- 
nental Army. November 12, 1776, he was a member of a court martial at 
Phillipsburg, Pa., and was in the battle of Trenton in the following month. 
January 1, 1777, he became commander of the 9th Regiment, Massachusetts 
Line. In recognition of his patriotic efforts the town of Brookline in Febru- 
ary, 1777, took action as follows: a vote of thanks was given "To Col. 
James Wesson for the good service he has rendered the Town by enlisting the 
afore-mentioned Sixteen Men for this town." It was also voted "that a sum 
of Six Pounds be paid him as a further acknowledgement for that Service." 
In the battle of Stillwater, September 19, 1777, his regiment was in the center 
in General Learned's Brigade. General Burgoyne, in his address to the court, 
complimented Colonel Wesson, who had command of a post when his troops 
arrived in November, 1777. In the battle of Monmouth, June 28, 1778, Colonel 
Wesson was very severely wounded. Drake in his "Historic Fields Mansions 
of Middlesex," states that "Leaning over his horse's neck to look under the 
cannon smoke, which enveloped everything, a ball from the enemy grazed his 
back, tearing away his clothing, and with it fragments of his flesh. Had he 
remained upright an instant longer he would have been killed; as it was, he 
remained a cripple for life." He continued to serve in the army until January 
1, 1781, when he was retired. In 1784 he acquired 130 acres of land in Marl- 
boro (in a portion of the town since annexed to Hudson.) He died there 



THE MASSACHUSETTS MAGAZINE 229 

October 15, 1S09, and was buried in what is now Spring Hill Cemetery in 
Marlboro. The following inscription is on his gravestone: 

"Glory with all her lamps shall burn 
And watch the warrior's sleeping day; 
Till the last trumpet rouse his urn 
To aid the triumphs of his day." 

ADJUTANT CHRISTIAN FEBIGER of Newbury, was born in the 
island of Fiinen, Denmark, in 1746. His father died when Christian was 
about 16 years old. He received a military education and then went to 
Santa Cruz as a member of the staff of his uncle who had been appointed 
Governor there. In 1772 he travelled through the American Colonies and in 
the following year came here to engage in commerce. He became Adjutant 
of Colonel Samuel Gerrish's Regiment, April 26, 1775. A letter from Jona- 
than Titcomb, dated April 28, 1775, commending him is preserved in the 
Archives v. 146, p. 25. As narrated in the historical section of this article. 
Adjutant Febiger did gallant service at the battle of Bunker Hill and led the 
belated contingent of Colonel Gerrish's Regiment at the last stage of the 
conflict in time to be of real service. He was Lieutenant and Adjutant of 
Colonel Benedict Arnold's Regiment on the expedition to Quebec through 
the Maine woods in the fall of 1775, and was taken prisoner December 31, 
1775. He remained in captivity until September, 1776, when he was sent 
to New York with other prisoners. November 13, 1776, he was appointed 
Lieut. Colonel of the 11th Regiment, Virginia Line. He fought in the Penn- 
sylvania campaign and September 26, 1777, was made Colonel of the Second 
Virginia Regiment. He was on General Greene's right wing at the battle of 
Germantown and led 4000 men with two guns at Monmouth. He commanded 
the right wing on the attack at Stony Point and won renown by capturing 
the British commander in person. September 1, 1780, he was sent to Phila- 
delphia to forward stores to the army and was on recruiting duty later in 
Virginia. He was at Yorktow r n at the time of the surrender. He was 
retired January 1, 1783, and September 30, of that year, w r as brevetted 
Brigadier General. During his military career he was called "Old Denmark.'" 
After the war he settled in Philadelphia and was treasurer of Pennsylvania 
from November 13, 1789, until his death September 20, 1796. 

SURGEON DAVID JONES of Abington, came to that town from 
Wrentham, March 28, 1757. He was a selectman in Abington in 1760 for 
six years. September 26, 1774, he was a delegate from that town to the 



.- 



--': 



230 COLONEL SAMUEL GERRISH'S REGIMENT 

county congress at Plympton and was chosen a member of one of the com- 
mittees. He was a delegate to the First Provincial Congress at Salem, Octo- 
ber 5, 1774, and the Third Congress at Watertown, July 31, 1775. May 1, 
1775, he was engaged as Surgeon of Colonel Samuel Gerrish's Regiment and 
was one of the Surgeons approved by the Committee of Congress, July 5, 1775. 
He served through the year in this regiment and through 1776, was Surgeon 
of Colonel Loammi Baldwin's 26th Regiment, Continental Army. He died 
March 27, 1S22. 

SURGEON'S MATE SAMUEL BLANCHARD of Boston, was engaged 
June 8, 1775, to serve in that rank in Colonel Samuel Gerrish's Regiment. 
He reported with Surgeon Baker in August, 1775. On the 31st of that month 
he was reported as having left the regiment. He was called Surgeon in a 
list of prisoners sent from Halifax to Boston in the cartel "Swift", November 
9, 1777. June 27, 1779, he was engaged as "Doctor" of the ship "Vengeance" 
in the State service on the Penobscot expedition and served until August 27, 
1779. In 1780 he was Surgeon on the privateer ship "Pilgrim" of Beverly, 
Captain John Robinson. In a list of officers dated August 2nd of that year 
he is described as follows: "age 25 yrs. ; stature 6 ft.; complexion, light; res- 
idence, Boston." 

QUARTERMASTER MICHAEL FARLEY, JR., of Ipswich, was in 
Colonel Daniel Appleton's 3d Essex County Regiment, September 9, 1756, 
and was a Sergeant in Captain Nathaniel Wade's Company, Colonel John 
Baker's 3d Essex County Regiment, on the Lexington alarm, April 19, 1775. 
April 27, 1775, he was engaged as Quartermaster of Colonel Samuel Gerrish's 
Regiment and served in that organization through the year. In 1776, he 
was Second Lieutenant in Captain Richard Dodge's Company, Colonel 
Loammi Baldwin's 26th Regiment, Continental Army, serving through the 
year as regimental quartermaster. January 1, 1777, he became First Lieu- 
tenant in Colonel James Wesson's 9th Regiment, Massachusetts Line. July 
26, 1779, he was promoted to Captain Lieutenant and January 1, 17S0, to 
Captain. He was taken prisoner at Young's House, February 3, 1780, and 
was later reported deceased. 

CAPTAIN JOHN BAKER JR., of Dorchester (also given Roxbury) was 
a Sergeant in First Lieutenant Hopestill Hall's 2nd Dorchester Company on 
-the Lexington alarm of April 19, 1775. April 24, 1775, he became Captain 
in Colonel Samuel Gerrish's Regiment and served through the year. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS MAGAZINE 231 

CAPTAIN THOMAS COGSWELL of Haverhill, was the son of Nathaniel 
and Judith (Badger) Cogswell. He was born in Haverhill, August 4, 1746, 
being one of a family of nineteen children. He was a member of the Com- 
mittee of Inspection of Haverhill, July 28, 1774, and January 30, 1775. lie 
was one of six Haverhill men to send to England in November, 1774, to 
purchase a copy of the "Norfolk Militia Book", which cost them £6:15 :00. 
He was a member of the Haverhill Fire Society in January, 1775. At the 
breaking out of the Revolution his wife went to live with her father, Gen- 
eral Joseph Badger, in Oilman ton, New Hampshire, while Captain Thomas 
went to war. He was engaged April 19, 1775, as Captain in Colonel Samuel 
Gerrish's Regiment and served through the year under that commander and 
his successor, Lieut. Colonel Loammi Baldwin. (See N. H. Rev. Rolls, v. II, p. 
748.) Through 1776 he was a Captain in Colonel Loammi Baldwin's 26th Reg- 
iment, Continental Army. In 1777 he was chosen Major (commissioned Feb- 
ruary 21) in Colonel Joseph Vose's 1st Regiment, Massachusetts Line. Novem- 
ber 26, 1779, he was commissioned Lieut. Colonel of Colonel Timothy Bigelow's 
15th Regiment, Massachusetts Line, and served until he was retired, January 1, 
1781. After the war he settled in Gilmanton, N. H., and became a leading 
citizen there. He was frequently chosen selectman and served the town as 
moderator. He was one of the original trustees of the academy. In 1784 he 
was chosen Chief Justice of the Court of Common Pleas and held that office 
until his death which occurred in Gilmanton, September 3, 1810. 

CAPTAIN TIMOTHY COREY of Brookline, was the son of Isaac Corey 
of Weston. April 26, 1775, he was engaged as Captain in Colonel Samuel 
Gerrish's Regiment and he served in this command through the year, at 
Sewall's Point. H. F. Woods in "Historical Sketches of Brookline", states 
that he was remembered "as an old gentleman who dressed in the costume 
of the last (18th) century as long as he lived, wearing 'a three-cornered 
cocked hat'." He joined the Free Masons in his old age when his son 
Elijah did, for he said, that "no son of his should know more than he did." 
He died in 1811, aged sixty-nine years. 

CAPTAIN BARNABAS DODGE of Gloucester, was the son of Jacob 
and Martha (Perkins) Dodge. He was born in Wenham January 1, 1741-2. 
May 14, 1775, he was engaged as Captain in Colonel Samuel Gerrish's Regi- 
ment, and served with the company at Chelsea through the year. From 
January 1, to December 31, 1776, he was a Captain in Colonel Loammi Bald- 
win's 26th Regiment, Continental Army. A note in the Archives v. 237, pp. 



232 COLONEL SAMUEL GERRISH'S REGIMENT 

190-1, shows that he hired Thatcher's Island, July 4, 1782. During the latter 
part of his life he lived in Hamilton and died there October 28, 1817, aged 
76 years. 

CAPTAIN RICHARD DODGE of Wenham, was the son of Lieutenant 
Richard and Mary (Thorne) Dodge. He was born in that town December 
9, 1738. He served as corporal in Captain Richard Manning's Company, 
Colonel Daniel Appleton's Regiment, in a troop of horse, which marched for 
the relief of Fort William Henry in August, 1757. From April 7, to Novem- 
ber 19, 1758, he was a corporal in Captain Stephen Whipple's Company, 
Colonel Jonathan Bagley's Regiment. He was Lieutenant in Captain Billy 
Porter's Wenham Company of Minute Men in Colonel John Baker's Regiment, 
on the Lexington alarm, April 19, 1775. April 30, 1775, he was engaged as 
Captain in Colonel Samuel Gerrish's Regiment and served through the year. 
He held the same rank in Colonel Loammi Baldwin's 26th Regiment, Con- 
tinental Army, and in February of that year was stationed at Cambridge 
and Chelsea. It is on record that he lost articles at the time of the evacua- 
tion of New York, September 14, 177G. From September 30, to November 
7, 1777, he was Captain of a company in Major Charles Smith's 3d Essex 
County Regiment, on duty under General Gates in guarding prisoners of 
Lieut. General Burgoyne's Army to Prospect Hill. His name appears as 
Captain of a company in Colonel Putnam's Regiment on a pay roll dated 
February 22, 1785. In his father's will dated April 20, 1778, the son is styled 
■"Major". Captain Richard was a farmer in Wenham. He died in May or 
June, 1802. 

CAPTAIN JACOB GERRISH'S name appears in a return of companies 
of this regiment dated May 26, 1775, but as his company went with others 
to form Colonel Moses Little's Regiment a few days later, his record will be 
given in the account of that regiment. 

CAPTAIN ELEAZER LINDSEY of Lynn, son of Ralph and Mary 
(Breed) Lindsey, w T as born March 22, 1716-17. He was a Lieutenant in the 
late Captain Flint's Company, Colonel Ichabod Plaisted's Regiment, October 
11, 1756, at Fort William Henry. His name appears in the Archives in a 
list of men "belonging to Lynn, now called Lynn, Lynnfield & Saugus who 
served at Concord battle & elsewhere (year not given)." May 12, 1775, he 
"enlisted" as Captain of a Company in Colonel B. Ruggles Woodbridge's 
Regiment and we are unable to determine just how long the company was 
connected with that regiment, but in a return dated July 21, 1775, the com- 



THE MASSACHUSETTS MAGAZINE 233 



pany is credited to Colonel Samuel Gerrish's Regiment. Two days later, 
Adjutant Febiger of Colonel Gerrish's Regiment, reported that the number 
of men at Maiden was insufficient and Captain Lindsey of that regiment was 
ordered to go there with his company. The following document proves his 
connection with this regiment: 

"Maiden, August ye 3d 1775 

A return of Captain Eleazer Lindfey's Company, in Colonel Samuel Ger- 
rish's Regiment 

Capt Elr Lindfey 

Lieut Daniel Galushee" etc. etc. 

Massachusetts Archives, v. 35, p. 137. 

Captain Lindsey's conduct at Maiden on August 6, has been reviewed in 
the historical section of this article together with the account of his court 
martial and dismissal on the 25th of August. No further record of service 
of Captain Lindsey can be found in the Massachusetts Archives but there is 
•excellent reason for believing that the "Eleazer Lindsley" or Lindsey who 
was Second Major of the "Eastern Battalion" at Morris, N. J., February 
13, 1776; later Lieut. Colonel of the same organization and from January, 
1777, to May 27, 1779, Lieut. Colonel of Colonel Oliver Spencer's Additional 
Continental Regiment, was the same man. Heitman in his "Historical Reg- 
ister of the Officers of the Continental Army", states that this officer in 
Colonel Spencer's Regiment was from Massachusetts and that he retired May 
27, 1779. 

CAPTAIN EZRA LUNT of Newbury, or Newburyport, was another 
company commander who was in this regiment a very brief time and left 
with his company to help form the newly organized regiment of Colonel 
Moses Little. His record will be given in connection with the history of 
that organization. 

CAPTAIN THOMAS MIGHILL of Rowley, son of Captain Nathaniel 
and Priscilla (Pearson) Mighill, was born April 2, 1722. He was appointed 
deacon of the First Church in Rowley, May 15, 1709. In July, 1771, he be- 
came Captain of the 1st Rowley Company, in Colonel Stephen Emery's 
Regiment. He was Captain of a company of Minute Men from Rowley, on 
the Lexington alarm of April 19, 1775, and April 24, 1775, was engaged as 
Captain in Colonel Samuel Gerrish's Regiment. He served through the year. 
Through 1776, he was Captain of a company in Colonel Loammi Baldwin's 
26th Regiment, Continental Army. From July 8, to October 10, 17S0, he 



234 COLONEL SAMUEL GERRISH'S REGIMENT 

was Captain in Colonel Nathaniel Ware's Special Three months Essex County- 
Regiment. He was town clerk of Rowley for many years. He lived in a 
house on Central Street in Rowley, which was owned in the latter part of 
the 19th century by William Moody. He died in Rowley August 20, 1S07, 
aged 86 years. The following inscription is on his gravestone in the old cem- 
etery in that town: — 

"Beneath this sculptured stone is laid, 
The Saint and Patriot's hoary head 
Who long was taught in Virtue's school 
To live by faith and walk by rule." 

CAPTAIN BENJAMIN PERKINS of Newbury, commanded a company 
which was credited to this regiment May 26, 1775, but which a few days 
later went with others above mentioned to form Colonel Moses Little's 
Regiment. His biographical sketch will be given in connection with that 
regiment. 

CAPTAIN JOSEPH PETTENGILL of Fryeburg, was probably the man 
of that name who as a resident of Newbury, aged 32 years, enlisted March 
31, 1759, in Colonel Joseph Gerrish's Regiment, and had a record of having 
served on a former expedition to Lake George in 1756. In a muster roll 
dated August 1, 1775, his name appears as First Lieutenant of Captain John 
Baker's Company, Colonel Samuel Gerrish's Regiment, with the statement 
that he had enlisted April 28, 1775, and had served three months and five 
days. In a return of officers ordered in the Provincial Congress, June 2, 1775, he 
is given as "Ensign, Capt. Jesse Dorman's co. Col. James Scammon's Regi- 
ment." He probably served first in Colonel Scammon's Regiment, and then 
was transferred to Colonel Gerrish's Regiment, and promoted to First Lieuten- 
ant, serving until September 14, 1775, when he was promoted Captain. He 
remained in that command through the year and during 1776, was Captain 
in Colonel Loammi Baldwin's 26th Regiment, Continental Army. January 
1, 1777, he became Captain in Colonel James Wesson's 9th Regiment, Massa- 
chusetts Line, and served in that rank until July 26, 1779. when he was 
promoted Major. He was transferred to Colonel Joseph Vose's 1st Regiment, 
Massachusetts Line, at least as early as August 2, 1782, retaining his rank as 
Major. He was called "Major Commandant" of this regiment in a return of 
effectives, dated December 27, 1782, and was reported "on command at West 
Point", in August, 1783. Heitman in his "Historical Register of the Officers 
of the Continental Army", states that he served to November, 1783, and 
died in 1785. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS MAGAZINE 235 

■ CAPTAIN JONATHAN POORE of Newbury, was the son of John ami 
Ann (Longfellow) Poore. He was born in Newbury, January 20, L737, and 
lived all his life in the old homestead in that town. He was Captain of a 
company of militia in Colonel Samuel Gerrish's Regiment, on the Lexington 
alarm of April 19, 1775. The roll of this company is given in Currier's 
"History of Newbury", p. 5S6. February 3, 1776, he was commissioned 
Captain in Colonel Jedediah Huntington's Regiment, Continental Army. 
June 26, 1777, he was commissioned Captain of the First Company, Colonel 
Daniel Spafford's 7th Essex County Militia Regiment. After the war he 
filled various town offices and was often on the jury. He kept a public 
house for a number of years. He died in Newbury, March 19, 1S07. 

CAPTAIN WILLIAM ROGERS of Newbury, was a private in Captain 
Edmund Moore's Company, Colonel Jonathan Bagley's Regiment, from May 
7, to November 20 (endorsed 1758). On the Lexington alarm of April 19, 
1775, he commanded a company of Minute Men in Colonel Samuel Gerrish's 
Regiment. Five days later he was engaged to serve in the same rank in 
Colonel Gerrish's Provincial Army Regiment, and he served through the year 
under him and his successor Lieut. Colonel Loammi Baldwin. The rolls of 
both of these companies are given in Currier's "History of Newbury", pp. 
588 and 603. In 1776 he was Captain of a company raised in Newbury, 
Salisbury and Topsfield, to re-inforce the Continental Army in Canada. He 
served as Captain in this regiment commanded by Colonel Edward Wiggles- 
worth until September 5, 1776, when he was promoted Major. From 
August to November, 1781, he was Major of Lieut. Colonel Enoch Putnam's 
Regiment. 

CAPTAIN ISAAC SHERMAN of Exeter. N. H. (also given New Haven, 
Conn.), was a native of Connecticut and was a school teacher in Exeter. He 
was engaged April 27, 1775, as Captain in Colonel Samuel Gerrish's Regiment 
and served through the year. In 1776 he was Captain in Colonel Loammi 
Baldwin's 26th Regiment, Continental Army, until March 29th, when he 
was promoted Major in that regiment. January 1, 1777, he became Lieut. - 
Colonel of Colonel Charles Webb's 2nd Regiment, Connecticut Line. August. 
1778, he was detached to General Scott's Light Troops, and in 1779, 
was in General Wayne's Light Corps, at the storming of Stony Point, 
July 15, 1779. He was promoted Lieut. -Colonel Commandant of the Sth 
Regiment, Connecticut Line, October 28, 1779. It is stated in "Connecticut 
in the Revolution", that he commanded the Second Brigade, at Westfield, 



236 COLONEL SAMUEL GERRISH'S REGIMENT 

New Jersey, February 5, 1780. January 1, 1781, he was transferred to the 
5th Regiment, Connecticut Line. He retired January 1, 1763, and died 
February 16, 1S19. He was a member of the Connecticut Society pi the 
Cincinnati. 

CAPTAIN ELIPHALET SPAFFORD (or SPOFFORD) of Newbury, was 
the son of Lieutenant John and Sarah (Poor) Spafford. He was born in 
1725 (baptized October 24). He was Ensign in Captain Daniel Spafford's 
2nd Rowley Company, Colonel Samuel Roger's Regiment, June 7, 1765, and 
Lieutenant in Captain Daniel Spafford's Company, Colonel Stephen Emery's 
7th Essex County Regiment, March 23, 1767. He was Captain of a detach- 
ment from Colonel Samuel Gerrish's Regiment on the Lexington alarm of 
April 19, 1775, serving four days. June 20, 1776, he was commissioned Cap- 
tain in Colonel Daniel Spafford's 7th Essex County Militia Regiment. The 
"Spofford Genealogy" states that he died October 7, 1776, "of a fever". 

CAPTAIN SAMUEL SPRAGUE of Chelsea, was the son of Phineas and 
Elizabeth (Green) Sprague. He was born in Maiden September 27, 1712. 
In June, 1771, he was Captain of a company in Colonel William Brattle's 1st 
Middlesex County Regiment. He commanded a Chelsea Company of Militia 
on the Lexington alarm of April 19, 1775, and a muster roll of the company 
may be found in Chamberlain's "History of Chelsea", v. II, p. 610. May 4, 
1775, he was engaged as Captain in Colonel Samuel Gerrish's Regiment and 
served in that organization through the year. He purchased the Tattle farm 
in Chelsea April 13, 1782, and died in Chelsea April 17, 1783, aged 71 years. 
(April 15, aged 70 years, g. s. ) His grave stone has upon it the following 
inscription : 

"Prepare all friends to follow me, 
If you the face of God do hope to see." 

CAPTAIN NATHANIEL WADE of Ipswich, was another company 
commander who was in this regiment in May and left with his men to help 
form Colonel Moses Little's Regiment. His record will be given in the 
account of that organization. 

CAPTAIN WARNER was another officer named in the muster roll dated 
May 26, 1775. He was probably the Captain Nathaniel Warner of Gloucester 
who a few days later was in Colonel Moses Little's Regiment. His record 
will be given later under that head. 

CAPTAIN JOHN WOOD of Woburn, son of John and Esther Wood 
was born August 23, 1740. He was a private in Captain Leonard Whiting's 



THE MASSACHUSETTS MAGAZINE 237 

Company from May 14, to December 3. 17G0. He was Second Lieutenant 
in Captain Joshua Walker's Company, Colonel David Green's 2nd Middlesex 
County Regiment, on the Lexington alarm of April 19, 1775. He was en- 
gaged April 24, 1775, as Captain in Colonel Samuel Gerrish's Regiment and 
according to a muster roll dated August 1, 1775, had served 99 days to that 
date. His name appears as Ensign in a list of "training soldiers belonging to 
3d Woburn Co. under Captain Timothy Winn," dated May 13, 1775, but the 
list was probably made up earlier than the date would indicate. He served 
through the year in this regiment and in 177G, was Captain in Colonel 
Loammi Baldwin's 26th Regiment, Continental Army. In 1777 he was re- 
ported "the month of february with ye sick." From September 4, 1777, to 
October 20, 177S, he was Captain of a company of artificers under Major 
Elisha Painter in the Continental Army, and pay accounts rendered by the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts against the United States, show that he 
was Captain in Colonel Jeduathan Baldwin's Regiment of Artificers some time 
between 1777 and 1780. 

FIRST LIEUTENANT SAMUEL CARR of Newbury was the son of 
John, Jr., and Ann Carr, born in Newbury December 6, 1740. He was in 
the service at Lake George in 175S, and April 2, 1759, at the age of 19, en- 
listed in Colonel Joseph Gerrish, Jr.'s Regiment. From November 2, 1759, 
to December 9, 1760, he was a private in Captain Samuel George's Company 
of Newbury, at Louisburg. He marched on the Lexington alarm of April 19, 
1775, as Lieutenant in Captain William Roger's Company, and five days later 
"enlisted" as First Lieutenant in a company commanded by the same Cap- 
tain Rogers, in Colonel Samuel Gerrish's Regiment. He served through the 
year. During the year 1776, he was First Lieutenant in Captain Ezra Bad- 
lam's Company, Colonel Loammi Baldwin's 26th Regiment, Continental 
Army. January 1, 1777, he was commissioned Captain in Colonel James 
Wesson's 9th Regiment, Massachusetts Line, and served through 17S0. From 
January 25 to April 12, 17S0, he served as Brigade Major. Heitman in the 
"Historical Register of the Officers of the Continental Army", credits him 
with service in the 9th Regiment to May 3, 1782, when he was transferred 
to the 8th Massachusetts Regiment of the Line. He retired January 1, 17S3. 
"Major Samuel Carr" died in Newbury, Novembers, 1810. 

FIRST LIEUTENANT JOSEPH CHEEVER of Chelsea, son of Nathan 
and Elizabeth (Tuttle) Cheever, was born in Chelsea, December 3, 1752. He 
was a Sergeant in Captain Samuel Sprague's Company, on the Lexington 



238 COLONEL SAMUEL GERRISH'S REGIMENT 

alarm of April 19, 1775. May 4th he was engaged as First Lieutenant in 
the same captain's company in Colonel Samuel Gerrish's Regiment and 
served through the year. Through 177G, he was First Lieutenant in Captain 
Barnabas Dodge's Company, in Colonel Loammi Baldwin's 26th Regiment, 
Continental Army. It is stated in the Xew England Hist. Gen. Soc. Register, 
v. 38, p. 1SS, that he commanded a company at Bunker Hill after the cap- 
tain was wounded and that he was a lieutenant in command of a companv 
at Trenton. He was commissioned Captain by Governor Hancock in 179:}, 
and his commission has been presented to the Maiden Public Library. He 
removed from Chelsea to Maiden where he died October 23, 1830, aged 7^ 
years. During the later years of his life he was a pensioner of the Revolution. 

FIRST LIEUTENANT THOMAS CUMMINGS of Boston (also given 
Needham), served (probably as a private) in Captain Caleb Kingsbury's 
Company of Needham, on the Lexington alarm of April 19, 177-3. The Cap- 
tain of the company attested a signed statement that said Cummmgs lost 
articles in the battle of Menotomy, and compensation was ordered in the 
House of Representatives, June 24, 1776. May 1, 1775, he was engaged as 
First Lieutenant in Captain Timothy Corey's Company, Colonel Samuel 
Gerrish's Regiment, and he served in that command through the year. 
November 6, 1776, he was commissioned Second Lieutenant in Colonel Thomas 
Marshall's 10th Regiment, Massachusetts Line. He resigned October 13, 
1778, and died October 24, 1S25. 

FIRST LIEUTENANT ROBERT DODGE of Ipswich, son of Isaac 
and Lois (Herrick) Dodge, was born in Beverly, September 20, 1743. He 
was a private in Captain Gideon Parker's Company, from June 19, to Decem- 
ber 13, 1761. On the Lexington alarm, April 19, 1775, he was First Lieuten- 
ant in Captain Elisha Whitney's Company of Minute Men. April 30, 1775, 
he was engaged to serve in the same rank in Captain Richard Dodge's Com- 
pany in Colonel Samuel Gerrish's Regiment and served through the year. 
March 13, 1776, he was commissioned Captain in Colonel Isaac Smith's Reg- 
iment for three months' service. May 7, 1776, he was commissioned Captain 
in Colonel Jonathan Cogswell's 3d Essex County Regiment. Augu-t 12, 
1776, he marched to join Colonel Ebenezer Francis's Regiment for the defence 
of Boston, and was commissioned Captain in that organization, September 
23, 1776. He marched April 25, 1777, as Captain in Colonel Jonathan Tit- 
comb's Regiment for Rhode Island service and August 15, 1777, was Captain 
in Colonel Samuel Johnson's 4th Essex County Regiment, serving in the 



THE MASSACHUSETTS MAGAZINE 239 

Northern Army until his discharge, December 14, 1777. The author of "The 
Dodge Family", states that he was at Bunker Hill, the surrender of Burgoyne, 
and in all, in 23 engagements. He was a representative to the General 
Court from 1S01 to 1S13. The Reverend Manassah Cutler was an intimate 
friend of his. Captain Dodge was "thrifty and always had ready money 
which he loaned to neighbors without security and seldom lost anything. 
He was especially helpful to young men. He was a pioneer in tree culture 
and in October, 1S01, gave a list of 3,642 trees which he had raised from seed 
and was given a premium by the Massachusetts Society for the Promotion of 
Agriculture. He lived long enough to see these trees grow into a fine forest." 
He died in Hamilton, June 15, 1S23. 

FIRST LIEUTENANT MOSES DUSTIN of Candia, New Hampshire, 
was a resident of Haverhill, Massachusetts, during the French war and saw 
service as follows: in Captain Joseph Smith's Company, of Rowley in 1760; 
Captain Henry Young Brown's Company, from May 7, to November 1, 1762, 
and Captain Timothy Hamant's Company, from November 2, 1762, to June 
1, 1763. April 24, 1775, he was engaged as First Lieutenant in Captain 
Thomas Cogswell's Company, Colonel Samuel Gerrish's Regiment. During 

1776, he was First Lieutenant in Colonel Loammi Baldwin's 26th Regiment, 
Continental Army. He lost articles at the evacuation of New York, Septem- 
ber 14, 1776. In 1777, he was First Lieutenant in Colonel Enoch Poor's, late 
Colonel Nathan Hale's 2nd Regiment, New Hampshire Line, was taken prisoner 
at the battle of Hubbardton, July 7, 1777, and was exchanged October 24, 

1777, for D. Durnford, Engineer (list of prisoners to be exchanged, made up 
by Lieut. -General Burgoyne and Major General Horatio Gates.) He was pro- 
moted Captain, September 20, 1777, and was retired January 1, 1781. 

FIRST LIEUTENANT MATTHEW FAIRFIELD of Wenham, son of 
Josiah and Elizabeth (Appleton) Fairfield, was born May IS, 1745. On the 
Lexington alarm of April 19, 1775, he was a private in Captain Billy Porter's 
Wenham Company, in Colonel John Baker's Regiment. May 2, 1775, he 
was engaged as First Lieutenant in Captain Barnabas Dodge's Company, 
Colonel Samuel Gerrish's Regiment, and served through the year. Through 
1776, he was First Lieutenant in Captain William Bent's Company, Colonel 
John Greaton's 24th Regiment, Continental Army. January 1, 1777, he 
became Captain in Colonel Edward Wigglesworth's 13th Regiment, Massa- 
chusetts Line, and served until October 22, 1777, when he resigned. (The 
date is given as November 22, in the "Historical Register of the Officers of 
the Continental Army.") 



240 COLONEL SAMUEL GERRISH'S REGIMENT 

FIRST LIEUTENANT MOSES ILSLEY of Newbury, was a private 
in Colonel John Greenleaf's Company (train band) June IS. 1757. March 23, 
1767, he was Ensign in the 2nd Newbury Company, Colonel Stephen Em- 
ery's 7th Essex County Regiment. He was First Lieutenant in Captain 
Jonathan Poor's Company of Militia, Colonel Samuel Gerrish's 2nd Essex 
County Regiment, April 19, 1775. 

FIRST LIEUTENANT THOMAS PIKE of Rowley, was in all proba- 
bility, the man of that name and town who enlisted at the age of 21 years, 
in March, 1760, in Captain Joseph Smith's Company, "for the reduction of 
Canada." He probably saw other service in the French war but the Ar- 
chives contain so many records of service of men of this name that it is 
impossible to identify the individuals. April 19, 1775, he served as Sergeant 
in Captain Thomas Mighill's Rowley Company, on the Lexington alarm, and 
five days later was engaged as First Lieutenant in Captain Thomas Mighill's 
Company, Colonel Samuel Gerrish's Regiment. He lost articles at the battle 
of Bunker Hill. He served through the year. 

FIRST LIEUTENANT CALEB ROBINSON of Exeter, New Hampshire, 
son of Caleb and Mary Robinson, w r as born in Exeter, May 22, 1746. May 
18, 1775, he was engaged as First Lieutenant in Captain Isaac Sherman's 
Exeter Company, in Colonel Samuel Gerrish's Regiment and served through 
the year. During 1776, he w T as First Lieutenant in Colonel Loammi Bald- 
win's 26th Regiment, Continental Army. When the army was re-organized 
at the end of 1776, he was made Captain in the 2nd Regiment, New Hamp- 
shire Line, commanded by Colonel Nathan Hale. He was taken prisoner at 
the battle of Hubbardton, July 7, 1777, and was exchanged for Lord Peter- 
sham, Captain in the 29th British Regiment. July 13, 1781, he became 
Brigade Inspector, and October 6, 17S1, Major of the 2nd Regiment, New 
Hampshire Line. He retired March 1, 1782. 

SECOND LIEUTENANT AMOS COGSWELL of Atkinson, New Hamp- 
shire (also given Haverhill), was the son of Nathaniel and Judith (Badger) 
Cogswell of Haverhill. He was born in Haverhill, Massachusetts, October 2, 
1752, and was one of nineteen children, eight of whom served in the Revo- 
lutionary Army. May 20, 1775, he was engaged as Second Lieutenant in 
his brother Captain Thomas Cogswell's Company, Colonel Samuel Gerrish's 
Regiment, and served through the year. During 1776, he was First Lieu- 
tenant in the same Captain's company in Colonel Loammi Baldwin's 26th 
Regiment, Continental Army. He lost articles in the evacuation of New 



THE MASSACHUSETTS MAGAZINE 241 

York. From January 1, 1777, to December 31, 1780, he was Captain in 
Colonel James Wesson's 9th Regiment, Massachusetts Line, and January 1, 
1781, was transferred to Colonel Michael Jackson's 8th Regiment, Massachu- 
setts Line. June 12, 17S3, he was again transferred to Colonel Michael Jack- 
son's 3d Regiment, Massachusetts Line, and was brevetted Major, Septem- 
ber 30, 1783, serving to the 3d of November following. He served in 
many battles including Princeton, Trenton and Monmouth. He was a 
member of the New Hampshire Legislature in 1S07-10, 1812, 1814-5, and 
in the Senate in 1S1S-20. He was a member of the Massachusetts Society 
of the Cincinnati. His death occurred January 2S, 1S26. 

SECOND LIEUTENANT MARK CRESSEY, of Rowley, son of John 
and Sarah (Davis) Cressey, was born January 18 (bap. January 27), 1733-4. 
From June 13, to September 12, 1754, he was a sentinel in Captain Nathan 
Adam's Company, Colonel Winslow's Regiment. The statement is made in 
"The Cressey Family", that he also saw service on the eastern frontier in 
1754. He marched on the Lexington alarm of April 19, 1775 as Second Lieu- 
tenant of Captain Thomas Mighilfs Company of Minute Men. April 24, 1775, 
he was engaged as Second Lieutenant in the same captain's company, in Col- 
onel Samuel Gerrish's Regiment, and served through the year. During 177G, 
he was Second Lieutenant in Captain Thomas Mighill's Company, Colonel 
Loammi Baldwin's 26th Regiment, Continental Army. He lived in the 
house on Bradford street in Rowley, which his father built, and died there 
May 4, 1816. 

SECOND LIEUTENANT NATHAN DIX of Woburn, was a private in 
Captain Joshua Walker's Company, Colonel David Green's 2nd Middlesex 
County Regiment, on the Lexington alarm, April 19, 1775. April 24, 1775, 
he was engaged as Second Lieutenant in Captain John Wood's Company, 
Colonel Samuel Gerrish's Regiment, and served through the year. In 1776, 
he held the same rank under the same captain in Colonel Loammi Baldwin's 
26th Regiment, Continental Army. From January 1, 1777, to December 31, 
1780, he was Captain in Colonel James Wesson's 9th Regiment, Massachu- 
setts Line. January 1, 1781, he was transferred to Colonel Michael Jackson's 
8th Regiment, Massachusetts Line, and again transferred, June 12, 17S3, to 
Colonel Michael Jackson's 3d Regiment, Massachusests Line. September 30, 
1783, he was brevetted Major and he continued to serve until November 3, 
1783. He was a member of the Massachusetts Society of the Cincinnati. 

SECOND LIEUTENANT PAUL DODGE of Ipswich, son of Paul and 
Faith (Jewett) Dodge was born in Ipswich, May 17, 1745, He was Sergeant 



242 . COLONEL SAMUEL GERRISH'S REGIMENT 

in Captain Elisha Whitney's Minute Men's Company, on the Lexington alarm, 
April 19, 1775. April 30, 1775, he was engaged as Second Lieutenant (also 
called Ensign) in Captain Richard Dodge's Company, Colonel Samuel Ger- 
rish's Regiment, He served through 177G, as First Lieutenant in Colonel 
Loammi Baldwin's 26th Regiment, Continental Army. He may have been 
the man of that name who was Captain in Colonel William Jones, 3d Lincoln 
County Regiment, May 22, 17S0. He purchased a large tract of land in New- 
castle, N. H., and built a mansion upon it. He died in Newcastle, December 
20, 1820. He was called "Colonel" Dodge. 

SECOND LIEUTENANT SIMEON HALE is given as the junior com- 
missioned officer in the muster roll of Captain Jonathan Poor's Company 
which was called out on the Lexington alarm, April 19, 1775. From a copy 
of a receipt dated Newbury, March IS, 1777, we know that a Simeon Hale 
(rank and date not given) served for six weeks in Captain Jonathan Hale's 
Company. Nothing further regarding his service has been found. 

SECOND LIEUTENANT JONAS JOHNSON of Brookline, was a private 
in Captain Thomas White's Brookline Company, in Colonel William Heath's 
Regiment, on the Lexington alarm of April 19, 1775. April 26, 1775, he 
was engaged as Second Lieutenant in Captain Timothy Corey's Company, 
Colonel Samuel Gerrish's Regiment, and served through the year. He was 
reported "sick". 

SECOND LIEUTENANT JOSEPH KNIGHT (or KNIGHTS), of Man- 
chester, was probably the man of that name, who as a resident of Newbury, 
w'as a private in Captain Johnson Moulton's Company, from December 13, 
1761, to July 16, 1762. From June 25, to December 13, 1767, he was a pri- 
vate in Captain Moses Parker's Company. May 2, 1775, he was engaged as 
Second Lieutenant (also called Ensign), in Captain Barnabas Dodge's Com- 
pany, Colonel Samuel Gerrish's Regiment, and served through the year. In 
1776, he was Second Lieutenant in Captain Barnabas Dodge's Company, in 
Colonel Loammi Baldwin's 26th Regiment, Continental Army. 

SECOND LIEUTENANT JOHN NOYES of Newbury, was a Sergeant in 
Captain Jacob Gerrish's Company, on the Lexington alarm of April 19, 
1775. Five days later he was engaged as Second Lieutenant (also called 
Ensign) in Captain William Roger's Company, Colonel Samuel Gerrish's Reg- 
iment, and served through the year. During 1776, he was a Lieutenant in 
Captain Ezra Badlam's Company, Colonel Loammi Baldwin's 26th Regiment, 
Continental Army, and lost articles at the evacuation of New York, Septem- 



THE MASSACHUSETTS MAGAZINE 243 

ber 14, 1776. He was reported discharged 2S0 miles from home. (At 
expiration of his term of service.) 

SECOXD LIEUTENANT WILLIAM OLIVER of Chelsea, was engaged 
May 4, 1775, as Second Lieutenant (also called Ensign) in Captain Samuel 
Sprague's Company, Colonel Samuel Gerrish's Regiment, and served through 
the year. He died in January, 1S03, according to the "Historical Register of 
the Officers of the Continental Army." 

SECOXD LIEUTENANT JOHN PINGREE of Rowley, held that rank 
in Captain Eliphalet Spatford's Company, Colonel Samuel Gerrish's Reginunt, 
on the Lexington alarm of April 19, 1775. Service six days. 



Hcparinitttf of thtAmirifan^flolutiott 

J * 1T7 7 5 - 1 7 8 2 



Frank Al.Gar.dner.>!. IXEdi 



Lincoln Galley. 

STATE VESSEL. 

The inner harbors and bays of Massa- 
chusetts must have presented a picturesque 
sight during the days of the American 
Revolution, for the vessels and small craft 
which made up the State and privateer 
navies included about everything of any 
description that would float, from a row- 
boat to a full rigged ship. Some of the 
vessels represented types which were 
thousands of years old like galley. These 
vessels had the triangular lateen sails with 
the long tapering yard which was slung be- 
low its center to the mast and the lower and 
heavier end made fast by the tack. This 
was a rig common to the early Romans 
and still in use today in the Mediterranean. 

The author was somewhat in doubt at 
first about the rig of this vessel, there be- 
ing a possibility that the name "Lincoln 
Galley" was entirely a name of a schooner, 
brig, or some other kind of a craft, but 
the fact that no other descriptive noun 
has been found in connection with the 
name and that reference is made to her in 
the records as quoted in the Massachusetts 
Soldiers and Sailors of the Revolution, v. 
VIII, p. 627, as "Lincoln galley," settles 
the question. 

We know that some fair sized vessels 
were captured during the war by men in 
row boats and it is not surprising that 
some of these row boats or galleys had 
their motive power increased by the use 
of such a simple arrangement as the lateen 

sail. 

A vessel known as the " Lincoln Galley" 
was in commission as early as the spring 
of 1777, for a receipt was given to Rich- 



ard Devens on May 24th of that year by 
Nehemiah Ingersoll for 33 days provisions 
for one man on board the " Lincoln Gal- 
ley". A vessel called the "Lincoln Galley," 
commanded by "Jo Ingraham" is men- 
tioned as being at Penobscot in 1779, in 
the Archives, v. 27, p. 193. Xo further 
reference to such a vesfel about that time 
has been found, and no such naval com- 
mander as "Jo Ingraham", can be found 
in the "Massachusetts Soldiers and Sail- 
ors of the Revolutionary War." Whether 
this vessel was in the Penobscot expe- 
dition of the year and in some mysterious 
manner escaped destruction, or was at 
Penobscot upon some occasion previous 
to that disaster, we do not know. We do 
know, how r ever, that in 17S0, the "Lincoln 
Galley", w^as still in commission and was 
commanded also at that time by Captain 
Ingraham. Several credits for supplies 
for the "Lincoln Galley," are found in the 
Board of War, Minute Book, under dates 
of April 22, May 6 and 25, and July 23, 
all 1780. The vessel was evidently being 
put in preparation for a summer cruise, or 
what is more likely, for the expedition 
described in the following entry in the 
Board of War records: 

"Ordered, That Capt. Hopkins deliver 
Capt. Ingraham for the Rev d Samuel Wil- 
liams going to make an observation on the 
Eclipse of the Sun (going pr the Lincoln 
Galley) 

15 Gallons W. I. Rum 

1-2 Hundred Sugar. 

1-2 lb Pepper (ground) 

2 Pewter Dishes 

1 ditto Bason 

1 Dozn Knives & 1 Dozn Forkes 



DEPARTMENT OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION 



215 



1 Dozn Wine Glafses 
4 Tumblers" etc. etc. 

Board of War, Sept. 25, 17S0. 
"Ordered That Capt Ingraham receive 
from the Wine Cellar for the Revd Samuel 
Williams going to Penobscot 

9 1-2 Galls Tenf Wine @ £25 

Oct. 2, 17S0. 
"Ordered that Mr Ivers pay Robert 
Harrington for the following articles for 
Stores for the Revd Mr Williams going to 
Penobscot, 

2 Barrells Cyder 90 

2 " Cyder 42" etc. etc. 

October 5, 1780. 
"Ordered That Mr Ivers pay Robt 
McElroy for Stores for the Revd Mr Wil- 
liams going to Penobscot 

10 lb Tobacco @ 96 48-" 

October 16, 1780. 

Just how much these "incidentals" 
assisted the scientific and convivial clergy- 
man in his solar observations we are not 
informed. Careful search of the records 
by the author has, however, revealed the 
fact that of the above mentioned articles 
the only ones returned were " 2 Wine 
Glasses", December 1, 1780. Much food 
for thought may be found in pondering 
what would happen if junkets on similar 
lines w T ere authorized by present day 
Legislatures. 

Reverend Samuel Williams LL. D., was 
the son of Rev. Warham Williams of 
Waltham. He was born in that town 
April 23, 1743, and graduated from Har- 
vard College in 1761. While still a student 
in the college he was selected by Professor 
Winthrop to accompany him to Newfound- 
land to observe the transit of Venus. 
After his graduation he taught school in 
Waltham for two years and October 11, 
1763, he was licensed to preach by the 
Association of Ministers at Cambridge. He 



was ordained in Bradford, November 20, 
1765. In 1780 he was appointed Mollis 
Professor of Mathematics and Natural 
Philosopy in Harvard. During the fifteen 
years prior to this appointment he had 
kept up his interest in science and while at 
Bradford had studied under Benjamin 
Thomson later known as Count Rumford. 
During his first year as professor at Har- 
vard he was requested by the American 
Academy of Arts and Science, and the 
Corporation of Harvard College to go to 
Penobscot Bay to observe a total eclipse 
of the sun and by order of the General 
Court of Massachusetts, this vessel, the 
"Lincoln" galley was fitted out for his use 
as mentioned above. He went on board 
October 9, 17S0, accompanied by quite a 
company of notables as follows: Stephen 
Sewall, Professor of Oriental Languages; 
James Winthrop, Librarian; Fortesque 
Vernon, A. B.,and Messrs. Dudley Atkins, 
John Davis (afterwards Judge of the Dis- 
trict of Massachusetts), George Hall, Jchn 
Dawson, (afterwards the Member of Con- 
gress from Virginia) and Jeremiah Van 

Rensalaer and King, students of 

the university and his son Samuel The 
eclipse was observed October 20, 1780. 
During his stay at Penobscot, he received 
every attention and courtesy from Captain 
Mowart commander of the British naval 
forces at Penobscot. During his professor- 
ship at Harvard he received the honorary 
degree of Doctor of Laws from Yale College 
and the University of Edinburgh. He was 
an active member of the American Acade- 
my of Arts and Sciences, the Meteoro- 
logical Society of Manheim, Germany and 
the Philosophical Society of Philadelphia. 
He removed to Rutland, Vermont., where 
he preached for about six years and then 
occupied a pulpit at Burlington, Vermont, 
for two years. While at the latter place 
he delivered a course of lectures in the 
University of Vermont. He died in Uut- 



246 



THE MASSACHUSETTS MAGAZINE 



land in January, 1S17, at the age of 74 
years. The Rutland Herald of January 
8, 1817, referred to him as follows: 

"In the death of the Reverend and 
learned gentleman, his family have sus- 
tained an irreparable loss, and his numer- 
ous friends and acquaintances, will long 
and deeply lament a dispensation, which 
has thus deprived them of the virtuous, 
elegant, high and dignified mental enter- 
tainments always enjoyed under the beams 
of this great philosophic, scientific and 
Christian luminary. Xor is it with an 
ordinary sensibility that every class of 
society will regard so great a dispensation — 
for notwithstanding the respectful atten- 
tion of the good and great, he would often 
descend from that eminence to which he 
was scarcely less entitled by his uncommon 
literary attainments, than by his profession 
as a Christian minister, to the humble 
walks of Life, when by his frankness, sin- 
cerity and the suavity of his manners, he 
captivated the affections and dispensed 
delight and instruction to all around him." 
"Williams' Family", pp. 103-7. 

We find no further mention of this ves- 
sel until the spring of 1781, as follows: 

"Pay Roll of the Officers & Marines Be- 
longing to the Lincoln Galley in the fer- 
vice of Mafathusets, John Curtis Com- 
mander. 



John Curtis, Commander, Entry April 10, 1781. 
Robert Auskins, Lieutenant, " Mar. 19. 
Jeremiah Dawsey, Master, " " 26, 

William Auskins, Mate, April 1, 17-1. 

CAPTAIX JOHN CURTIS appears for 
the first time in the records in the above 
reference. 

LIEUTEXAXT ROBERT AUSKIXS 
at the time of his engagement lor this 
service has no previous record that we 
have been able to rind. 

MASTER JEREMIAH DAWSEY was 
given as "Master of a merchant ship" in 
a list of prisoners sent from Halifax to 
Boston, in the cartel "Swift", Xov. 9, 
1777. An Order on Quartermaster White, 
dated Camp Coxeshead, July 2, 1781, 
signed by Colonel Samuel McCobb, shows 
that provisions were delivered to said 
Dawsey, Capt. of "Lincoln Galley's" prize. 
He had been engaged as Master of the 
"Lincoln Galley" March 26, 1781. 

MATE WILLIAM AUSKIXS was first 
mentioned in the records at the time when 
he was engaged to serve in that rank on 
the " Lincoln Galley", as above cited. 

How many captures were made in this 
cruise we do not know but we are sure of 
at least one, which was handed over to 
Master Jeremiah Dawsey to bring to a 
home port. 

All of the above named officers received 
their discharge July 23, 1781, and we find 
no further mention of the galley. 



A Continuation of the Genealogical Dictionary of Essex County Families, compiled until 
Oct., 1009, by Sidney Perley, Esq., in The Essex Antiquarian. 

itfamtly Oktt£alngt£0 

LUCIE MARION GARDNER, A.B., Editor 

Essex was the first COtinty settled in the Massachusetts Bay Colony, and all the records of nily Massachusetts families 

found in the probate, court and town records of this county prior to the year \*»> are gathered 

and published here in alphabetical form, and arranged genealogically when powible. 



Mark and Aaron Burnham"; also 
various lots of woodland and salt- 
marsh and portions of "the School 
House Farm." (Essex Deeds 14.5-70; 
146-210; 153-219; and 157-S2.) It 
is probable that Joseph and his wife 
moved away from Ipswich as no fur- 
ther mention is made of them in the 
records. 
327 — Elizabeth 8 , bap. Aug. 19, 1753 She 
was mentioned in her father's will 
written in October, 1765. 

139 

Stephen Burnam 5 , son of Lieut. 
Thomas and Susanna Burnam was a 
yeoman and fisherman. He was 
called "pf Chebacco" at the time of 
his marriage, but he resided most of 
his life in Gloucester. He married, 
November 6, 1735, Mary Andrews, 
daughter of Thomas and Mary (Smith) 
Andrews. (Essex Antiquarian v. III. 
p. 99.) June 20, 175-2, he conveyed 
his share (one-fifth) of nine acres of 
land on Cross's Island in Ipswich. 
(Essex deeds, 110-25.) He sold, Feb. 
25, 1755, to John Orne of Salem, a 
great pasture right and land in Salem 
which John and William had mort- 
gaged! (Essex Deeds, 101-115.) 
March 16, 1766, he sold a dwelling 
house and land in Gloucester to Isaac 
Allen of Ipswich and Xov, 15, 1770, 
conveyed to Francis Burnam of Ips- 
wich, his homestead in Gloucester, 
with dwelling house, barn, etc., and. 
28 acres of land," near Isaac Allen's 



home lot." (Essex Deeds. 129-233 
and 131-163. Other lots sold are de- 
scribed in Essex Deeds 130-121 and 
132-172 and 151-293.) He may have 
removed out of the county after the 
sale of his lands, etc., in 1770, as we 
find no further mention of him or his 
wife Mary. 

Children : 
328— Mary 8 , b. Gloucester, Dec. 12. 1736. 
329— Stephen- 8 , b. Gloucester Mar. 20, 
1738. As Stephen Burnam of Glou- 
cester, he married Ipswich, Apr. 10, 
1760, Hannah Butler. She was prob. 
the Hannah, dau. of William and 
Sarah Butler who was bap. Ipswich, 
Apr. 26, 1741. He was a private in 
Captain Stephen Whipple's Co., Col. 
Jonathan Baglev's Regiment, from 
Apr. 8 to Xov. 16, 1758. (Mass. Ar- 
chives, v. 96, pp. 231 and 509.) He 
resided in Ipswich as late as October 
20, 1771. when the last of four chil- 
dren whose births are on record in 
Ipswich was born. He was a private 
in Capt. Peter Clark's Co.. Col. Stick- 
ney's Regiment, Gen'l Stark's Bri- 
gade, which marched from Lynde- 
borough, X. H. (to which place he 
had removed) to join the Northern 
Continental Arm v. (X. H. Rev. Rolls, 
v. II, p. 1^9.) Jan. 10, 1789, he con- 
veyed to John Butler of Ipswich 53 
rods of land with the westerly end of 
a house thereon. (Essex Deeds. 156- 
171.) According to the "Burnham 
Genealogv" he died Aug. 10. 1822. 
330— *Lucy 8 , b. Aug. 14, 1739; d. July 12, 

1740. 
331— Lucy 8 , b. Gloucester. July 4, 1741. 
332— Joseph 8 , b. Gloucester Feb. 9, 1743; 
d. Nov. 26, 1760.* 



248 



THE MASSACHUSETTS MAGAZINE 



333— Ruhamah 8 , b. Gloucester, Julv 17, 
1745; d. Aug. 10, 1823.* 

334— Nathaniel 6 , b. Mar. 4, 1747*; m. 
Ipswich, Jan. 20, 1774, Mary Bur- 
nam [Xo. 211] dau. of Francis and 
Mary (Burnam) Burnam. She was 
bap. Mar. 31, 1745. He removed to 
Lyndeboro (now Greenfield ), X. H. 
He was a private in Capt. Peter 
Clark's Co., Col. Stickney's Reg't, 
Gen'l Stark's Brigade, which marched 
from Lyndeborough, July, 1777, to 
join the Xorthern Continental Army. 

335— James 8 , b. Oct. 14, 174S*; bap. Ips- 
wich, Apr. -0, 1755. 

336— Caleb 6 , b. May 19, 1750*; d. Feb. 17, 
1751.* 

337— Caleb 6 , b. Feb._2, 1752*; bap. Ips- 
wich, Apr. 20, 1/55. The "Burnham 
Genealogy" gives the date of his 
death as July 14, 1776, and states 
that he was killed at Lake George. 
No soldier, however, by the name of 
Caleb Burnham appears in the Mass. 
Soldiers and Sailors of the Revolu- 
tionary War. 

338— Joshua 6 , b. Gloucester, Jan. 26, 1754, 
bap. Ipswich, Apr. 20, 1755. He 
went to Milford, X. H., when a young 
man and became a farmer in th^t 
town. He married Jan. 21, 1779, 
Jemima Wyman who was b. in 1757. 
Ramsdell's "History of Milford," 
N. H., states that he "was in the 
Revolutionary War several years, and 
held various offices up to Colonel in 
the State Militia. The X. H. Revo- 
- lutionary Rolls credit him with ser- 
vice, Apr. 23, 1775, and through the 
year in Capt. Josiah Crosbey's Co., 
Col. James Reed's Reg't. (N. H. 
Rev. Rolls v. I, pp. 102 and 20S.) He 
was frequer.tlv called "Colonel". He 
died in Milford. X. H., Jan. 7, 1835. 
His widow Jemima died in Milford 
Sept. 6, 1843. 

339-David 6 , b. Dec. 2, 1755f. He re- 
moved to Amherst. X. H. (which in- 
cluded Milford), and Dec. 8, 1775, 
marched from that place in Capt. 
Taylor's Co. to join the Continental 
Army on Winter Hill. He was a 
private in Capt. Xathan Ballard's Co., 
Col. Nichols's Regiment of Militia 
♦Not in Gloucester Records. Given in Burnham 

Genealogy. 

fGiven in Burnham Genealogy but not found in 

Ipswich Records. 



which marched from Amherst and 
Wilton for Ticonderoga on the alarm 
of June 29, 1777. On the 19th 
following month he was a r>rivate in 
Capt. John Bradford's Co., Col.Moses 
Xichols's Reg't. which marched to 
reinforce the Xorthern Continental 
Armv. (X. H. Rev. Rolls, v. I, p. 
244; v. II, pp. 74 and 213.) He then 
went to Reading, Vt., where he opened 
the first tavern there in 17S6; married 
Aug. 7. 1780, Abigail Brown, and died 
Nov. 16, ls.34. 
340-Joxathax 6 , b. Xov. 20. 175S.T The 
"Burnham Genealogy" is authority 
for the following additional state- 
ments about him, that he married 
Rachel Holt, went to live in Johnson, 
Vt.. where he became deacon, and 
died Feb. 5, 1S39, aged S7 years. 

141 

Lieut. Xathan Burnam 5 , the 
youngest son of Lieut. Thomas and 
Susanna Burnam, was a yeoman in 
Chebacco parish, Ipswich. He mar- 
ried, Xov. 22, 1744, Hannah Burnam, 
dau. of Lieut. Thomas and Hannah 
(.Jogswell) Burnam. [Xo. SO.] He 
sold two pieces of salt marsh on 
"Chebacco Long Causey" August IS, 
1749, to Benjamin Marshall (Essex 
Deeds, 109-213) ; one-half acre of land 
in Chebacco, "a part of the school 
farm," "annual rents of 1 penny 3 
farthings per annum" to Mary An- 
drews, wid. of John, August 1, 1754 
(Essex Deeds, 101-171), and five acres 
"lying on Rocky Hill in Chebacco" 
near Thomas Burnam's land, Jan. 10, 
175S. (Essex Deeds, 107-95.) From 
March 13 to July 9, 175S, he was Lieu- 
tenant in Captain Stephen Whipple's 
Company, Colonel Jonathan Bagley's 
Regiment, and was " Slain att the 
Battle of Ticonderoga" on the latter 
date His will, dated April 26, 175S, 
probated Sept. 4, 17oS, makes men- 
tion of his wife Hannah, sons Xathan. 
Asa and Thomas, and daughters 



FAMILY GENEALOGIES 



249 



Hannah, Susannah, Sarah and Eliz- 
beth Burnam. In the inventory 
dated Sept. 29, 175S. a "Wooulf" 
trap was mentioned. (Essex Prob. 
Files No. 4154.) His widow Hannah 
conveyed to Thomas Burnam, 4th, a 
landing place containing one and a 
quarter acres on the south side of 
Chebacco Point, Jan. 29, 1760. (Essex 
Deeds. 125-106.) Sept, 19, 1781, wid- 
ow Hannah of Ipswich; Nathan Bur- 
nam, gentleman, wife Hannah of 
Dunbarton, N. H.; Asa Burnam, yeo- 
man, wife Elizabeth of Dunbarton, 
N. H.; and Thomas Burnam, 7th, 
cooper, wife Martha, of Ipswich, con- 
veyed to Isaac Lee of Manchester, 9 
acres of land with dwelling house, 
barn, £ of a saw mill, tillage ground, 
orchard, etc., besides various other 
lots of land, some of which were a 
part of the "school farm", and a pew 
in the Chebacco meeting house. (Es- 
sex Deeds, 140-49 and 50.) Widow 
Hannah died in Dunbarton, March 1, 
1805. 

Children: 

341 — Hannah 8 , b. Nov. 1, 1745; mentioned 
in father's will, 1758. 

342 — Nathan 6 , b. May 27, 1747; m. Ipswich, 
Apr. 14, 1768, Hannah Marshall. He 
was called "gentleman" of Dunbar- 
ton, N. H., in 1 78 1. He went there 
about 1760 or 70 and was a selectman 
in 1776. (X. H. Pro v. Papers, v. VII 
p. 736.) 

343 — Susanna 9 , bap. Feb. 28, 1749; men- 
tioned in father's will, 1758. 

344 — Asa 8 , b. May 17, 1751; m. Elizabeth 

. He was called yeoman of 

Dunbarton, N. H., in 17S1. He was 
a wealthy and prominent citizen of 
that tovvn. 



345" 



arah 6 , bap. Mar. 



1753; men- 



tioned in her father's will in 175S. 
346 — Thomas 8 , bap. May 18, 1755; was a 
cooper in Ipswich. He was mar. "as 
Thomas 6th of Ipswich" to Martha 
Titcomb of Anclover, in the latter 
town, June 2, 1778. 



347 — Elizabeth 6 , bap. Nov. 13, 17 — ; was 
mentioned in herfather's will in 175S. 

143 

Jacob Burnam 5 , son of Jacob and 
Mehitable (Perkins) Burnam, was 
born in 1708. He married in Ipswich, 
August 19, 1734, Sarah Cogswell, 
daughter of John and Sarah (Brown) 
Cogswell. She was b. in Ipswich in 
1710. (Cogswell Gen. p. 51.) He 
was a yeoman in Ipswich. He died 
December 6, 1783, "in his 70th year." 
His will dated February 5, 1779, was 
probated January 5, 1784. In it he 
mentioned his grandson, James, son of 
his son Isaac, and his grandson, son of 
his son Joseph; also his daughters, 
Sarah, Eunice and Hannah Burnham. 
(Essex Probate Records, v. 356, pp. 
405-6.) 
Children: 

348 — Isaac 6 , bap. Apr. 6, 1735; m. Ipswich, 
Feb. 26, 1756, "Mrs." Lucy Giddings. 
While the Ipswich records call her 
"Mrs." we know that she was the 
daughter of Solomon and Sarah (Bur- 
nam) (No. 161) Giddings. Isaac was 
a tailor living in Ipswich in 17O4 (Es- 
sex Deeds, 134-1561 while in the doc- 
uments connected with the settle- 
ment of his estate he was referred to 
as a fisherman. (Essex Prob. Rec. 
356-9.) He died Apr. iq, 177.", aged 
39 years, of a fever, his wife Lucy 
having died on the 3d of the same 
month from the same cause, at the 
age of 36 years. Letters of adminis- 
tration of his estate were granted to 
Captain Daniel "Giddings," Jan. 7, 
1783. (Essex Prob. Rec. v. 356, pp. 
9, 53, 7S and 404-5.) Deacon Solo- 
mon Giddings, in his will dated June 
2 3. 1777, left bequests to his grand- 
children, children of this couple. 
These bequests were paid after the 
death of their grandmother, Sarah, 
widow of Deacon Solomon Giddings, 
the account being rendered Sept. 3, 
1S13. (Essex Prob. Files Xo. 10865.) 

340— Jacob*, bap. Aug. 28, 1737; prob. d. 



250 



THE MASSACHUSETTS MAGAZINE 



young, as he was not mentioned in 
his father's will in 1779. 

350 — Sarah 8 , bap. Aug. 5, 1739; unmarried. 

351 — Margaret 8 , bap. Mar. 7, 1741-2; m- 
Nov. 8, 1773, Joseph Burnam (Xo- 
156), son of David and Elizabeth 
(2nd wife) Burnam. He was b. Jan. 
8, 1743-4- She died in Essex Sept. 22, 
1826, a 84 yrs. (See Xo. 166.) 

352 — Joseph 6 , bap. Apr. 8, 1744. 

353 — James 6 , bap. June 22, 1746; probably 
d. young as he was not mentioned in 
his father's will made in 1779. 

354 — Eunice 8 , bap. Apr. 30, 1749; was alive 
in 1779. The "Burnham Genealogy" 
states that she was the Eunice who 
m. Nov. 19, 1799, but as she was over 
50 years of age at that time and we 
find no further evidence to prove it, 
we question the statement. 

355 — Hannah 6 , bap. Jan. 27, 1750-1. She 
d. Ipswich Apr. 17, 181 1, a/ 60. 

356 — Jacob 8 , bap. Dec. 29, 1754; d. Ipswich, 
Feb. 27, 1773 aged 18 y. 

• 144 

Solomon Burnam 5 , son of Jacob 
and Mehitable (Perkins) Burnham, 
was born about 1708. He was a 
yeoman in Ipswich. He married in 
Ipswich November 13, 1729, "Mehet- 
able Emerson," daughter of Thomas 
and Philippa (Perkins) Emerson. 
(Emerson Gen. pp. 67-8 and Ipswich 
Records.) She was born about 170S. 
He sold ten acres of woodland in Che- 
bacco woods, to Benjamin Marshall, 
Jan. 31, 1761, and other woodland in 
the same section' to David Marshall 
Jan. 27, 1776. (Essex Deeds, 113-90 
and 146-210.) He died in Ipswich 
April 15, 1784. "aged abt. 75 yr." In 
his will dated Apr. 23, 17S2, probated 
June 7, 1784, he mentioned his wife 
Mehitabel, sons Solomon, Jacob and 
Ammi, and daughters Sarah Linna- 
han, Philippi Burnham, Ruhamah 
Story, Mehetabel Foster and Mary 



Martin His son Jacob was appointed 
executor. The estate was valued at 
£587:10:10. (Essex Probate Files, 
Xo. 4169.) His widow "Mehetabel," 
died in Ipswich August 23, 1792, in 
her S4th year. 
Children: 

357 — Sarah 6 , bap. Aug. 30,1730 m. Ipswii h. 
Dec. 12, 1758, Clarke "Lennekin ' 
(Linehan) of Townsend. She was 
living in 17S2 when her father's will 
was written. 

358— Soloman- 6 , bap. Mar. 19, 1731-2; m. 
(int) Ipswich, Aug. 3, 1754, Mrs. 
Mary Knight of Damask Cove. The 
record of the baptism of two of his 
children is given in the Ipswich 
record, the later date being April, 
1764. He may have moved away as 
no further mention of himself or wife 
can be found in the local records. 

359 — Ammi 6 , bap. Mar. 24. 1733 4: was a 
yeoman in Ipswich. Hem. in Ipswich, 
Oct. 26, 1756, Martha Foster, dau. of 
Capt. Jeremiah and Dorothy ( Rust) 
Foster. She was bap. Ipswich, julv 
30, 1732. (Essex Prob. Files, p. 9888 > 
He sold land in Ipswich at Gi Idmgs 
Hill Nov. 11, 1780. (Essex D I . 
138-176.) He died in Ipswich, Mar. 
16, 1785, aged "abt. 51 y." Hi> will 
dated Dec. 2, 1784, was probated Apr. 
26, 1785. He mentioned his wife 
Martha, and his children. The e-tate 
amounted to £384:02:01. (Essex 
Prob. Rec. 357-393 and 358-295.) (Es- 
sex Prob. Files Xo. 1470.) His widow 
Martha d. July 10, 1786, aged 54 
years. His son Ammi 7 was a soldier 
in the Revolution, in Captain John 
Burnam's Company, Colonel Michael 
Jackson's, Sth Regiment, Mass. Line 
and for a short time in other compa- 
nies. (Mass. S. and S. in Rev. War, v. 
II. p. 859.) 
360 — Ruhamah 6 , bap. Feb. 1, i73S' 6 > m - 
Ipswich, Dec. 13, 1753, Jes-e Story, 
s. of Za:harias and Rachel (Andrews) 
Story. He was b. Chebacco, Mar. 12, 
17:50. He and his son Jesse were 
both members of Captain Jonathan 
Cogswell, Jr's Co.. which marched 
from Ipswich on the Lexington Alarm 

of April 19, 1775- Ma y 3. l 115* Jesse 



FAMILY GENEALOGIES 



2.51 



Jr. enlisted in Capt. Abraham Dodge's 
Co., Colonel Moses Little's Reg't, in 
the Provincial Army and was killed 
at Bunker Hill, June 17, 1775. Jesse 
Senior, was also in Capt. Jonathan 
Cogswell, Jr's Co., on the Lexington 
Alarm, April 19, 1775; in 1776 he was 
a member of Capt. Daniel Gidding's 
Co., Col. Joseph Foster's Reg't, 
stationed at Gloucester for seacoast 
defence. In 1778 he was a member 
of the train band, Capt. David Low's 
3d. Co., Col. Jonathan Cogswell's 3d. 
Essex Co. Reg't. (Mass. S. <fc S. in 
Rev. War v. XV p. 13S) Ruhamah 
w. of Jesse, d. Ipswich, Feb. 10, 179S, 
aged 02 yrs. He d. Essex, May 26, 
1824, aged 94 y. 

361 — Philipa", bap. June 4, 1738, m. 
Isaac Burnam [Xo. 165] son of David 
and Elizabeth (:d wife) Burnam. [See 
No. 165] Shed. Essex Mar. 31, 1831, 
aged 93 y. 

362 — Mehitable 6 , bap. June 1-, 17J0; m. 
Ipswich, May r6, 1763, Joshua Foster, 

363 — Thomas 6 , (twin) bap. Apr. 11, 1742; 
d. young. 

364 — Jacob 6 , (twin) bap. Apr. 11, 1742; d. 
young. 

365 — Ephraim 6 , bap. Apr. 8, 1744; d. young. 

366 — Mary 6 , bap. Apr. 27, i74b;m. Ipswich. 
Sept. 19, 1769, Ephraim Martin, s. of 
Joshua and Sarah (Storey) Martin. 
He was bap. Ipswich, Feb. 23, 1745-6. 

367 — Ephraim 6 , bap. Jan. 22, 1746-9: prob. 
d. young, as he was not mentioned 
in his lather's will. 

368 — Jacob 6 , bap. Feb. 2, 1-5 1-2. He was 
called Jacob "3d" when he married 
June 11, 1772, Lucy Burnam, dau of 
Wesley [Xo. 163] and Deborah (Store\ ) 
Burnam. She was bap. Xov. 25, 
1750. He d. Essex, Aug. ic, 1820, 
and his widow Lucy died in that 
town, June 30, 1840. 

145 

John Burnam 5 , son of Jacob and 
Mehitable (Perkins) Burnam, was 
called Jacob 4th in the Chebacco Par- 
ish Church records when he married 
Bethiah Marshall, also of Chebacco, 
May 10, 1736. They were dismissed 
to the church in Norwich, Conn., in 
1747. 



Children born in Ipswich: 

369— Bethiah 9 , bap. Oct. 9, 1737. 
370— Jacob 9 , bap. Xov. 4, 1739! 

147 

Jonathan 5 , son of Capt. Jonathan 
and Mary (Perkins) Burnam, was born 
in 1710. He was a fisherman by 
occupation. As Jonathan "3d" he 
married in Ipswich, October 4, 1737, 
Elizabeth Proctor. She was born 
about 1714. From Craft's "Journal 
of the Siege of Louisburg," we learn 
that he was sick but improving at 
Canso, April 25. 1745, and under date 
of August 8, 1746, the entry is made 
that he went on board vessel to go 
with Colonel Eveleth to Canso. (Essex 
Inst. Hist. Ccl. v. VI, pp. 183 and 
191.) He conveyed to Francis Bur- 
nam, Jun., of Ipswich, cordwainer, a 
piece of salt marsh on the north side 
of Chebacco River, bordering on Rob- 
bin's Cove and land of Jacob Burnam, 
February 14, 1752. (Essex Deeds, 99- 
14.) He died in Ipswich March 26, 
1802, aged 86 years. His widow, 
Elizabeth died in Gloucester, July 14, 
1798, in her S4th year. 
Children : 

371 — Jonathan 6 , b. June 9, 1738. He was 
a member of Capt. Thomas Poor's 
Company, Col. Ebenezer Nichols's 
Regiment, from April 14 to Oct. 29, 
1756, on the e.spedition to Lake 
George. In the following year he 
enlisted in Col. Daniel Appleton's 
Regiment for the invasion of Canada. 
He was probably the Jomathan Bur- 
nam who was in Capt. Stephen Whip- 
ple's Company, Col. Bagley's Regi- 
ment, from Xov. 2, 175Q, to Feb. 28, 
1 76 1, in service at Louisburg. (Mass. 
Archives, vol. 06, p. 221; vol. C7, pp. 
70 and no; vol. 9S, pp. 380 and 493.) 
On his way home from the Louisburg 
campaign the vessel was wrecked on 
the Isle of Sables and the survivors 
were rescued and carried to Marble- 



252 



THE MASSACHUSETTS MAGAZINE 



head. He returned to Ipswich where 
he lived until July, 1763, when he re- 
moved to Hampton, N. H. He was 
chosen captain of the town company 
before the Revolution and when Gov. 
Wentworth declared himself for the 
British, Captain Burnham tells us 
that he himself erected a liberty pole 
"as high as Haman's gallows." He 
marched to Ipswich on the Lexington 
alarm and was chosen captain of a 
company of about 200 men. Xews 
came, to Ipswich that the British 
were coming to that town and so they 
remained there. He was offered a 
commission in Xew Hampshire and 
he returned there and was the means 
of mustering about a thousand men 
from Portsmouth, Dover, Hampton 
and Exeter to defend Portsmouth. 
They remained there about three 
months, when he marched thirty-one 
companies of New Hampshire (four 
from the fort and twenty-six others) 
"to Mistir" to join - the Army of the 
United Colonies about Boston. The 
following letter from General Sullivan 
shows how well he performed this 
service : 

"Camp on Winter Hill, Deer 24, 1775. 
Much Esteemed Gentlemen — 

I do myself the Honor of transmit- 
ting you by Colo Burnum a Return 
of the Militia sent by you from Xew 
Hampshire. The Troops are exceed- 
ing good, their spirit much ap- 
plauded and your vigorous exertions 
in procuring and sending them so 
seasonably meets with a just reward 
— Namely, The thanks of the whole 
Army. Colo Burnum would have 
returned some time since, but one 
Company did not arrive till yesterday 
& he could not return till he had 
mustered them. He has been much 
Engaged in taking care of the Troops 
& has been of singular service to 
them & me. I wish you to make 
him up in your bill & forward the 
same for payment before the time of 
Enlistment is expired. 

Gentlemen I am with much respect 
your most obedient servt. 

Jno Sullivan" 

(To the foregoing letter on a sepa- 
rate slip of paper, the following note 
was added.) 



"Col. Burnum has to his great 
Honour exerted himself greatly 'in 
this matter & his intluen<_e has in- 
creased the Enlistment very much 
(we could wish everyone of the Field 
officers had shown the same disposi- 
tion) he is now going forward to 
hasten and muster the Companies & 
accompany them to the Camp. We 
recommend him to your Notice as a 
man very deserving especially for his 
extra zeal in this matter." (X. H. 
Provincial Papers, v. VII, p. 700.) 
The letter was written to the Com- 
mittee of Safety in New Hampshire. 
He was appointed Lieut. -Colonel of 
Colonel Joshua Wingate's 1st N. H. 
Militia Regiment, organized for coast 
defence. In 1777 he served as muster- 
master for New Hampshire. He was 
moderator of Hampton in 1776 and 
again in 1793. He kept a tavern in 
the old Sanborn house at Hampton 
Falls for many years, until his re- 
moval about 1S00 to Salisbury, Mass. 
He wrote a very interesting sketch of 
his life when he was seventy years of 
age, and, to use his own language, 
"but just alive." He had no children. 
His death occurred in Salisbury, 
Mass., Nov. 27, 1814. (X. H. Rev. 
Rolls, v. I pp. 223 and 242, also v. II 
p. 2^6. History of Hampton Falls, 
N. H., pp. 218-221 and 556.) 

372 — Joseph 6 , b. Aug. 15, 1740. In Aug. 
1756, he was a soldier in Capt. Israel 
Davis's Company, Col. Bagley's Reg- 
iment at Fort William Henry, having 
joined as a volunteer from Col. Ber- 
ry's Regiment. Apr. 6, 1759, he en- 
listed at the age of eighteen in Col. 
Ichabod Plaisted's Regiment and 
Nov. 2nd of that year, was promoted 
corporal. He served continuously in 
that rank until Nov. 26, 1760, when 
he was made sergeant and continued 
to serve until Apr. 15, 1761. (Mass. 
Archives, Vol. 94.pp.3S6 and ;?o; Vol. 
97, p. 144; Vol. 98, pp. 207 and 302.) 

373 — Elizabeth 9 , b. Apr. 27, 1742; 111. Ips- 
wich, Nov. 9, 1761, George Pierce. 
The "Burnham Genealogy" states 
that she died June 18, 1819. 

374 — Mary 6 , b. March 18, 1714- 

375 — Abraham 8 , twin. b. Feb. 1747; ba P- 
Aug. 24, 175^. He married Feb. 11, 
1762, Mary Perkins, dau. of Samuel 



FAMILY GENEALOGIES 



253 



and Margaret (Towne) Perkins. She 
was born in Topstield, Sept. 28, 1733. 
At the time of his marriage he was a 
resident of Hampstead, X. H., and 
his oldest child was born there in the 
following year. Before 176.3 he had 
removed to Dunbarton, X. H., and 
his remaining children were born in 
that town. In July, 1777, he paid t to 
Admond Davise £7: 10:00 as part 
payment for his service in the Conti- 
nental, the town of Dunbarton paying 
said Davise £i::00.00 additional. 
(N. H. Rev. Rolls v. 3 p. 033.) He 
died July 19, 1814, aged 72 years. 
(History of Dunbarton, p. 238.) 

376 — Francis 6 , twin, b. Feb. 1747 ; bap. Aug. 

24, 1755. According to the "Burnham 

. Genealogy" he went to Moultonboro, 

N. H. A Francis Burnham d. Ipswich 

Aug. 8, 1800, a. abt. 45 y. 

377 — Samuel 6 , b. May 23, 1749; bap. Aug. 

24, 1755- 

378 — Aaron 8 , twin, b. Aug. 15, 1751, bap. 
Aug. 24, 1755 ; m. Jan. 12. 1770, Eliza- 
beth Sargent. The Burnham Geneal- 
ogy states that he and his brother 
Moses were drowned in Cape Ann 
harbor. 

379 — Moses 6 , twin b. Aug. 15,1751; bap. 
Aug. 24, 1755; m. int. July 2, 17S3, Jo- 
anna Kent, daughter of Stephen and 
Abigail (Lee) Kent. She was ban. 
Ipswich, Nov. t8, 1759. As stated 
above, the ''Burnham Genealogy" 
records that he was drowned with 
his twin brother, Aaron, in Cape Ann 
harbor. 

380 — Sarah 8 , b. Oct. 3, 175?, bap. Aug. 24, 
1755. (The Burnham Genalogy states 
that she m. Aaron Haskell and that 
she d. June 16., 184", but the compiler 
has found no records to confirm these 
statements.) (The Burnham Gene- 
alogy also states that another daugh- 
ter, Lucy, m. a Tilton and d. at Tilton, 
N. H., but the compiler of these notes 
can find no confirmatory records.) 

149 

Francis Burnam 5 , son of Capt. 
Jonathan and Mary (Perkins) Bur- 
nam was born in 1721. He was a 
yeoman in Ipswich. He married, first, 
Ipswich, int. Nov. 25, 1749, Sarah 



Eveleth. She was the daughter of 
James and Elizabeth (Cogswell) Eve- 
leth and was baptized September 3, 
1732. Their second child was born 
in 1751 and they were divorced before 
April 25, 1754, at which time he mar- 
ried, second, Mary Cavis, daughter of 
John and Elizabeth Cavis. She was 
baptized in Ipswich April 20, 1729. 
He died about 1S0S. His will dated 
August 10, 1S02, was probated .May 
3, 1S0S, In it he mentioned his 
wife Mary; sons Nathaniel, Ebenezer 
and Jonathan; daughters, Anna Low, 
Lucy Hardy, Lydia Boyd. Elizabeth 
and Abigail Burnham; grandson, Wil- 
liam Story and granddaughters, Mary 
Foster and Sarah Hough. (Essex 
Prob. Rec. v. 376, pp. 343-4.) His 
widow, Mary, died in Ipswich Septem- 
ber 27, 1816, aged 87 years, 5 months 
and 7 days. 

Children by first wife Sarah (Eve- 
leth) : 

381 — Franxis 6 . The date of his birth does 
not appear in the Ipswich records 
but the Burnam Genealogy gives it 
as Feb. 7, 1750. He m in Ipswich, 
June 22, 1777 (Mrs. in Chebacco 
Parish Ch. Record), Sarah Eveleth, 
and according to the Burnam Gen. 
removed to Maine and d. there Aug. 
S, 1800. 
382 — Mary 6 , b. Mar. 4, 1761 (Burnham Gen.). 

m. Hough, and according to 

the "Burnham Genealogy" removed to 
Maine. She probably died before 
1802 as Francis makes no mention of 
her but the name of his grand- 
daughter Sarah Hough appears in the 
document. 
Children by his second wife Mary 
(Cavis) : 

(The date of birth of any of them does 
not appear in the Ipswich records. 
The dates given are from the "Burn- 
ham Genealogy", the author of which 
probably had access to private re- 
cords not incorporated in the Ipswich 
vital iecords. All of the children are 
mentioned in the will of their father 



254 



THE MASSACHUSETTS MAGAZINE 



3»3— 



Francis, Essex Probate Rec, v. 376* 

PP 34.V4 ) 

Nathaniel", b Jan. 18, 1755; m. int. 
Dec. 4, 1778, Lucy Burnam, dau. of 
Deacon Thomas [Xo. ;q] and Lucy 
(Cogswell) Burnam. She was b. 
July ir, 1757. He was called "Capt." 
Nathaniel in the record, of his death 
in Essex, April 5, 1S42, at the age of 
86 years. His widow, Lucy died in 
Essex, May 17, 1844 as 87 years, 10 
mos. 

Anna", b Sept. 28, 1756. She married 
Dec. 30, 177S Aaron Low Jr.. son of 
Aaron and Rachel (Knowlton) Low. 
He was born in Chebacco. May 3, 
1755. She d. in Essex, Feb. 23, 1822 
ae 65 yrs. He d. Essex, Aug. 20, 
(C. R. 26) 1840, se 85 yrs. 
Ebenezer 6 , b. Sept. 25, 1758. Hem 
Aug. 9, 1 78 1, Abigail Low. He died 
Essex, Apr. 3, 1S28 as 70 yrs. She 
died Essex, Oct. 4, 183 1 as 68 yrs. 
Elizabeth 6 , b. Dec. 16, 1760, d. un- 
married in Essex, Feb. 20, 1846 ae 85 
yrs., 2 mos., 4 days. 
Lucy 6 , b. Feb. 21, 1763; m. Ipswich, 
Oct. 3, 1785, Samuel Hardy. He was 
b. in Ireland about 17 51 and d. in 
Essex, June 15, 1 8 24 as 63 yrs. She d. 
in Essex, Oct. 17, 1843 ^ 8o Y rs -> 8 
mos., 20 days. 

Lydia 6 , b. Feb. 9, 1766; m. Ipswich, 
Dec. 18, 1788, Adam Boyd. He d. in 
Essex, June 10, 1808 ae 47 yrs. She d. 
in Essex, May 3, 1844 as 78 yrs., 2 
mos., 24 days. 

Jonathan 6 , b. Apr. q, 1768; m. in 
Ipswich, Oct. 2. 1 794, Sukey Burnham 
dau. of Amos [391.] and Sarah (Gid- 
dings) Burnham. He d. in Essex, 
Feb. 2, 1827 as 57 yrs. His son Xim- 
rod was appointed administrator 
March 6, 1827. His estate was divid- 
ed Feb. 3, 1S29, eight ch ldren being 
named in the dlvi ion. (Essex Prob. 
Files 413 1.) His widow Sukey (Susan) 
survived him. 

Abigail 6 , b. Oct. ?o, 1770 and d. ac- 
cording to the "Burnham Genealogy" 
March 14, 1850. 

160 



David Burnham 5 . son of David 
and Elizabeth (Perkins) Burnham, 
was b. in Ipswich June 17, 1714. 



384- 

385- 

386- 
387- 

388— 
389— 



390— 



He was a yeoman and resided in 
Chebacco. He m. Sept. 2~>. 17; 1. 
Elizabeth Marshall. He conveyed 
to his brother, Westly Burnham of 
Ipswich, six acres of land, March 4, 
1752, being J of a piece of land 
owned in partnership between his 
father, David Burnam, Sr., and said 
David, Jr. (Essex Deed?, 101-222.) 
He d. Dec. 27, 1802, ae 89 yrs., his 
wife Elizabeth having d. Nov. 15, 
1801, ae about S6 yrs. Letters of 
administration were granted to his 
sons David and Benjamin Feb. 8, 
1803. (Essex Prob. records, 370-137 
and 364-5.) 

Children: — 
391 — Amos 6 , b. July 13, 1735. He m. first, 
"Mrs." Sarah Giddings, according to 
"The Giddings Family." p. 26-32, she 
was the daughter of Thomas and 
Martha (Smith) Giddings, and was 
baptized in Ipswich Feb. 3, 1736-7. 
She d. Jan. 20, 1782, ae 45 yrs. He 
m. second, in Ipswich, Oct. 4, 17S2, 
Mrs. Mehitable Foster. He was 
drowned while fowling, Nov. 28, 
1788, in his 54th year. 
392— Benjamin 6 , bap. 'Dec. 5, 1736, d. 

young. 
393— David 8 , bap. Nov. 19, 1738. d. young. 
394— David 6 , bap. Aug. 10, 1740. He m. 
in Ipswich, Dec. 21, 1764, Ann 
Grover. According to the "Burnliam 
Genealogv" ?he was b. Sept. 9. 1743, 
and d. in 1836 ae 94 yrs. From the 
same source we read that he d. in 
1834 ae 94 yrs., although none of the 
last three (fates appears in the vital 
records. 
395— Elizabeth 8 , bap. Oct. 10. 1742. 
396— Moses 8 , bap. Jan. 6, 1744-5 ;d. young. 
•397 — Hannah 6 , bap. July 5, 1747; m. in 
Ipswich Nov. 3, 176S, Thomas Story. 
398— Ebenezer 6 , bap. Oct. 1, 1749. 
399— Susanna 6 , bap. Dec. 9, 1750; d. 

voung. 
400— Susanna 8 , bap. Apr. 29, 1753. 
401 — Benjamin 6 , bap. Aug. 24, 1755 He 
was a private in Capt. Abraham 
Dodge's companv. Col. Moses Little^s 
Re-'iment. He enlisted May 3, 1775, 
and served through the year. Hem. 



FAMILY GENEALOGIES 



255 



May 25, 1778, Susanna Day, daugh- 
ter of Abner and Susannah Day. She 
was b. in Gloucester about 1752 and 
d. in Essex Dec. 17, 1843, ae 91 yrs. 
6 mos. He d. in Essex April 12, 
1847, ae 91 yrs. 8 mos. 

402 — Moses 6 , bap. Oct. 9, 1757, m. Eunice 
Andrews, daughter of Jonathan ar.d 
Ann (Story) Andrews, April 6, 1799. 
She d. Essex, Sept. 24, 1S30, ae 57 
yrs. G. R. [ae 50 y. C. R.] He was 
living at the time of her death. 

403— Enoch 6 , bap. Oct. 5, 1760. He 
probably was the man of that name 
who was a private in Captain John 
Dodge's company, Col. Jacob Ger- 
rish's Regiment of Guards at Winter 
Hill in April and May, 1778. He m. 
Feb. 11, 1799, Hannah Bennett, 
daughter of Joseph Bennett She 
was bap. in Ipswich Apr. 12, 1761. 
He d. in Ipswich in Oct. 1802, and 
she d. in Essex Apr. 27, 1829, ae 70 
yrs. 

404— Parker 6 , bap. July 1, 1764. Hem. 
first, in Ipswich, March 8, 1787, 
Tabitha Day; d. . He m. sec- 
ond, Dec. 3, 1804, Martha Lufkin. 

163 

Wesley Burnam 5 (frequently 
spelled Westley), son of David and 
Elizabeth (Perkins) Burnham was b. 
Oct., 1719. He was a yeoman in 
Ipswich and m. first, at Chebacco, 
Dec. 9, 1740, Joanna Thompson. 
(Given as Thornton in the "Burnham 
Genealogy.") She evidently died be- 
fore Nov. 10, 1743, for upon that date 
he m. second, Deborah Storey, daugh- 
ter of Dea. Zachariah and Rachel 
(Andrews) Storey. She was b. at 
Chebacco Aug. 6, 1723. He was a 
private in Capt. Richard Manning's 
Company, Troop of horse, Col. Daniel 
Appleton's Regiment, which marched 
to the relief of Fort William Henry, 
Aug. 17, 1757. He was a private in 
Capt. Daniel Gidding's (sea coast) 
Company, Col. Joseph Foster's Regi- 
ment from Feb. 3, 1776, to Nov. 18, 



1776, stationed at Gloucester. Aug. 
15, 1777, he marched as a private in 
Capt. Robert Dodge's Company, Col. 
Samuel Johnson's 4th Essex County 
Regiment, and served in the northern 
department until his discharge at 
Peekskill, Dec. 14, 1777. A return 
dated April 30, 177S, shows that he 
was a private in Capt. David Low's 
Third Company, Col. Jonathan Cogs- 
well's Third Essex County Regiment. 
He conveyed to Wesley Burnam, Jr., 
of Ipswich, mariner, two acres of land 
in Chebacco, bounded upon his own 
land, and Sarah, Eunice and Hannah 
Burnam, March 22, 1785. (Essex 
Deeds, 165-10.) He d. Ipswich, June 
28, 1797, in his 7Sth year. His son, 
Wesley Burnam, fisherman, was ap- 
pointed administrator Dec. 4, 1797, 
his widow, Deborah, having refused 
to accept the trust a few days before. 
The inventory, dated Dec. 13, 1797, 
showed an estate valued at ^"1103: 
79:00. One-third was set off to the 
widow April, 1798. (Essex Files, 
4188.) His widow, Deborah, d. Nov. 
21, 1821, at Essex in her 9Sth year. 

Children, all by second wife, Deb- 
orah : — 

405— Joanxa 8 , bap. Ipswich, Oct. 14, 1744; 
m. Ipswich, Jan. 23, 1766, Amos An- 
drews, son of John and Mary ( Burn- 
ham [Xo. 74]) Andrews. He was b. 
Ipswich, May 31, 1743. He die 1 O.t. 
21, 1S27; and she died in Gloucester, 
his widow, Jan. 20. 1847, aged one 
hundred ana one years. 

406 — Lydia 6 . bap. Ipswich, Nov. 24, 174.5; 
m. Ipswich, Jan. 14, 176S, Thomas 
Emerton, s. of Joseph and Rebecca 
(Goulij Ermrton. He was bap. at 
Chebacco, July 1, 1744. May 2, 1775, 
he enlisted in Capt. Abraham Dodge's 
Co., Col. Moses Little's Re^ment, 
and served through the year. He 
was in the battle of Bunker Hill Jan. 
17, 1775; he enlisted in Capt. Daniel 
I 



256 



THE MASSACHUSETTS MAGAZINE 



Gidding*s Co., Col. Joseph Foster's 
Coastguard Regimt-ru at Gloucester. 
From Feb. 29, to May 31, 1770, he 
was a corporal in the above company. 
(Emerton Family, p. 34 and Mass. 
S. & S. in Rev. War, v. 5, p. 353.) 

407— Wesley', bap. Ipswich, Apr. 30, 1747, 
was a fisherman or mariner. At the 
age of 17 he made a voyage to Lis- 
bon and sailed over the sunken city. 
He married in Beverly, Dec. 10, 1771. 
Mrs. Molly Woodbeiry. She was 
born about 1850, or 1S52. He was 
a private in Capt. David Low's (3d) 
Co., Col. Jor.a. Cogswell's 3d Essex 
Co. Reg't ., according to a return 
dated April 30, 1778, serving in the 
same company with his father. Later 
he engaged in privateering and was 
capture 1 and carried to England. 
After being confined for some time in 
Mill Prison it is said that he took ad- 
vantage of the offer to do sailor's duty 
except fighting in the British Navy. 
He went on the seventy-four gun 
ship Preston and while on a voyage 
to Jamaica was taken sick with small- 
pox and landed at Kingston where he 
was placed in a hospital. His de.tth 
w r as reported but he later astonished 
the Chebacco people by returning 
home. Roderick H. Burnham tells 
us that " He became a successful nav- 
igator. No vessel commanded by 
him was ever wrecked or dismasted, 
and his judgment in maritime mat- 
ters was very highly esteemed. He 
afterwards folio we 1 the ' hereditary 
occupation of vessel-building. For a 
considerable length of time he was 
totally blind. He was a man of ex- 
traordinary strength." Dudng the 
later years of his life he received a 
United States pension. His wife 
Marv d. in Esf-ex, Apr. 29, 1S30, aged 
82 y. Church Rec. (80 y. grave- 
stone.) He d Essex, Sept. 3, 1835, 
aged 88 yrs. His real estate was di- 
vided among his heirs. (Essex Pro- 
bate Files, No. 4189.) 

408— Deborah 9 , bap. Jan. 22, 17-18-9; m. 
Ipswich, Aug. 24, 1773, Nathaniel 
Emerson, s. of Nathaniel and Eliza- 
beth (Whipple) Emer on. He was 
bap. Ipswich, Nov. 19, 1732. He was 
a cooper by trade. (See Mass. S. & S. 
v. V. p. 347.) (Emerson Gen. p. 163.) 
He d. about 1782-3. 



409— Lucy 8 , bap. Nov. 25. 1750; m. Ips- 
wich, June 11, 1772. Jacob Burnam, 
t u ird [Xo. 368] s. of Solomon [No. Hi] 
and Mehitable (Emmerson) Burnam. 
He was bap. Ipswich Feb, 2, 1751-2, 
and d. Essex, Aug. 10, 1820. She d. 
Essex. June 30, 18 40. 

410— Mark 6 , bap. Apr. 1, 1753. He was 
a private in Captain Jonathan Cogs- 
well, Jr's Co. which marched on the 
Lexirgton alarm, April 19, 1775. 
May 3, 1775, he enlisted as a private 
in Capt. Abraham Dolge's Co., Col. 
Moses Little's 17th Reg't, and served 
th ough the year. Feb. 3, 177 i, he 
enlist-d as a private in Capt. Daniel 
(bidding's (Seacoasti Co., Col. Joseph 
Foster's Essex Co. Reg't. stationed at 
Gloucester. In April, 1778, he was a 
private in Capt. David Low's 3d Co. 
Col. Jonathan Cogswell's 3d Es-ex Co. 
Rtg't. He d. unmarried, in Essex, 
July 2, 1827, aged 74 yrs. 

411 — Elizabeth 6 , bap. Dec. 22, 1754; m. 
Jan. 19, 1773. Samuel Whipple of 
Danvers. He d. about Nov. 1802, 
and his widow Elizabeth was appoint- 
ed administratrix De:. 7, 1S02. She 
d. Danvers, June 9, 1840, "a 84 v." 
(Essex Prob. Rec. 370-30.) 

412— Sarah 6 , bap. Julv 15. 1759; m. Mar. 
20, 1783, Abnef Poland, Jr., s. of 
Abner and Dorothv (Burnam [No. 
286]; Poland. He was b. May 17, 
1761. 

413— Ruth 9 , bap. Oct. 11, 1761; d. 'sud- 
denly in a fit," Oct. 4, 1787, aged 27 
yrs. 

164 

(Benjamin Burnwm 5 . The belief 
expressed on page 126, v. IV, of the 
Massachusetts Magazine that the un- 
named child of David and Elizabeth 
(Perkins) Burnam, who was b. accord- 
ing to the family record, Dec. 7. 17^3, 
is untenable. A mistake was made 
and the Benjamin Burnam, widower, 
son of David and Betsev, who died in 
Essex, April 12, 1S47 (not 1S17), aged 
91 vrs. 8 mos., was [No. 401] the son 
of David and Elizabeth (Marshall) 
Burnam.) 



FAMILY GENEALOGIES 



257 



165 

Sergt. Isaac Burnam 5 , son of 

David and Elizabeth ( second 

wife) Burnam, was born, according 
to the family record, Aug. 31, 1741. 
and baptized on the sixth of the fol- 
lowing month. (Ch. Rec.) He was a 
private in Captain Stephen Whipple's 
Co., Col. Jonathan Bagley's Regiment, 
from April 5 to Nov. 19, 1758, in the 
expedition to Lake George. April 2, 
1759, he enlisted in Col. Daniel Ap- 
plet on' s Regiment for the invasion of 
Canada. His age, given at the time 
of this enlistment, was 18 years. 
From Nov. 2, 1759, to Dec. 5, 1760, 
he was a private in Capt. Stephen 
Whipple's Co., Col. Jonathan Bagley's 
Regiment at Louisburg. (Mass. Ar- 
chives 96-509; 97-41 and 110; 98-3S0 
and 493.) He was private in Capt. 
Thomas Burnam' s Company which 
marched on the Lexington alarm of 
April 19, 1775. May 1, 1775, he en- 
listed as. a private in Capt. Richard 
Dodge's Company, Col. Samuel Ger- 
rish's25th Regiment, Provincial Army, 
and continued under the same cap- 
tain after the Army of the United 
Colonies was formed in July, 1775, in 
the 38th Regiment, A. U. C, under 
Col. Samuel Gerrish, and later under 
Lt. Col. Loammi Baldwin. In 1776, he 
served under the same captain and 
colonel in the 26th Regiment, Conti- 
nental Army. Jan. 1, 1777, he be- 
came sergeant in Capt. Billy Porter's 
Company, Col. Ebenezer Francis's, 
later Col. Benjamin Tupper's 11th 
Regiment, Massachusetts Line, and 
was with that command at the battle 
of Bennington. He served under 
that captain until Jan. 1, 1780, when 
he joined Capt. Nehemiah Emerson's 
Company, Col. Thomas Marshall's 



10th Regiment. From Jan. 1, 1781, 
to Jan. 1, 1783, he was a sergeant in 
Col. Benjamin Tupper's 10th Regi- 
ment, Massachusetts Line. (Mass. 
Soldiers and Sailors in the Rev. War, 
Vol. II, 862-875.) He m. Philippa 
Burnam, daughter of Solomon [111] 
and Mehitable (Emmerson) Burnam. 
She was bap. in Ipswich June 4, 17o8. 
He d. in Essex Aug. 8, 1819, ae 78 
vrs. His widow, Philippa, d. March 
31, 1831, ae 93 vrs. 
Child:— 

414 — Isaac 8 , m. in Beverly July 29, 1799, 
Polly Williams. 

166 

Joseph Burnam 5 , son of David and 
Elizabeth ( , second wife) Bur- 
nam, was born in Ipswich, Jan 3 
(bap. Jan. 8), 1743-4. He was a 
fisherman by occupation. He m. in 
Ipswich Nov. 18, 1773, Margaret 
Burnam, daughter of Jacob [143) and 
Sarah (Cogswell) Burnam. She was 
bap. Ipswich, March 7, 1741-2. "Peg- 
Burnham, w. Joseph (d. Essex) Sept. 
22, 1826, a. 84 yrs." 

167 

William Burnam 5 , son of David 

and Elizabeth ( second wife ) 

Burnam was b. in Ipswich Aug. 10, 
(bap. Aug. 17), 1746. He was a 
yeoman and fisherman. He m. in 
Ipswich June 23, 1774, Bethulah 
Marshall, daughter of Joseph and 
Bethulah (Day) Marshall. She was 
b. in Ipswich Oct. 27, 1750. He 
conveyed to David and Benjamin 
Burnam of Ipswich, April 24, 17S4, 
pasture land in Chebacco. (Essex 
Deeds, 146-114.) Dec. 15, 17S7, he 
sold to Nathaniel Burnam, "joiner," 
and Ebenezer Burnam, cordwainer, 



258 



THE MASSACHUSETTS MAGAZINE 



two-fifths of a grist mill on the Fall's 
River, Chebacco. His mother Eliza- 
beth, relict of David, joining in the 
sale. (Essex Deeds, 161-57.) March 
4, 1791, he sold to Benjamin Burn- 
ham of Ipswich, fisherman, a tract of 
land in Ipswich bordering on Chebacco 
Pond and land of David Burnham. 
(Essex Deeds, 153-58.) His wife, 
Bethulah, or Bethuel, d. in Ipswich, 
Dec. 13, 1811, ae 59 yrs. He d. in 
Essex July 23, 1S25, ae 79 yrs. No 
records of births of any children of 
this couple have been found but the 
author of the "Burnham Genealogy" 
gives a son Francis who m. a Mary 
. No dates given. 

168 

Thomas Burn am 5 , son of Lieut. 
Thomas and Mary (Boardman) Bur- 
nam, was born Aug. 14, 1704. He 
was a joiner by occupation. He mar- 
ried Sarah — . The record of 

their marriage does not appear in Es- 
sex County and we know her Christian 
name only in connection with the 
record of baptism of their son Thomas 
as given below. His father bequeathed 
to him "all that estate both real and 
personal that fell to me by the death 
of my son John Burnam, dec'd . . . 
viz., the common pasture (so-called) 
and three quarters of an old Right in 
Lampson's Hill . . . and the one-half 
of a bond which is due to my 2nd 
son John's Estate and also ... all 
my carpenter tools and also my negro 
man named Will during his natural 
life." 

Child:— 
415 — Thomas 6 , bap. Ipswich, Feb. 24, 
1750. 



170 

Dr. Joshua Burnam 5 , son of Lieut. 
Thomas and Margaret (Boardman) 
Burnam, born Ipswich 29:7m:1710 
was a physician in Ipswich. He mar- 
ried (int.) Mar. 25. 174 ( .), Mrs. Susanna 
Poole of Lynn. She was probably the 
Susannah Poole dau of Timothy and 
Elizabeth (Goodwin) Poole who was b. 
Lynn Julv 16, 17M0. (Lvnn Vit. Rec. 
v. 1, p. 328., v. 2, p. 306.) (Essex Co. 
Prob. Files 22299.) He purchased of his 
father, Thomas, "the house in Ipswich 
town he now lives in", with barn 
and land adjoining, Jan. 31, 174S. 
(Essex Deeds, 92-80.) His father 
willed to him his husbandry tools, a 
a wood lot in Topsfield, rights at 
Jeffery's Neck and a negro girl, Zeeb. 
Oct. 20, 1761, he bought half a pew 
in the 1st Parish Meeting house, 
"which his father, Thomas, late of 
Ipswich died seized of" and sold it 
on the same day to Samuel Griffin, 
Jr., of Gloucester. (Essex Deeds, 131- 
60.) He sold various rights which he 
had inherited from his father to lands 
at Jeffrey's Neck, to Jacob Smith in 
1759 and 1761. (Essex Deeds, 10S- 
203 and 124-136.) His wife, Susanna, 
died in Ipswich May 19, 1759, in her 
29th year. He died in Ipswich, Mar. 
7, 1762, aged 51 yrs. 5 m., and letters 
of administration on his estate were 
given Mar. 15, 1762. The inventory 
showed an estate valued at £109:14: 
05, personal, and £332:18:04, real. 
It was divided into five portions, two 
of which went to the eldest son. John, 
and the other three to sons Joshua 
and Timothy, and daughter Susanna 
Wade, August 27, 1770. (Essex 
Prob. Files No. 4140.) Benjamin 
Brown of Reading was appointed 
guardian of the three sons John, aged 



FAMILY GENEALOGIES 



259 



17, Timothy, aged 15, and Joshua, 
aged 12, June 5, 17ti9. (Essex Prob. 
Files, No. 4123.) 
Children : — 

416 — Susanna 8 , b. Ipswich, June 30, 1750; 
m. Danvers, Oct. 26, 1769, John Wade. 
A John Wade, cabinet maker of Ips- 
wich d. in 1771, and his brother Wil- 
liam Wade was appointed adminis- 
trator Oct. 29, 1771. In account 
rendered April 1, 1797, money had 
been paid to Susanna Avers. Essex 
Prob. Files Xo. 28629.) 

417— Tohn 6 , bap. Ipswich. Feb. 9, 1752. 

Ha m. before 17 < 5, Jerusha , 

and live 1 in Lvnnfield. He is called 
"Captain" John in the records of that 
town, where he died Jan. 28, 1S06, 
aged 54 yrs. His will dated Jan. 28, 
1806, was probated Apr. 22, 1806. 
(Essex Prob. Rec. v. 373, p. 544.) His 
widow, Jeru-ha. d. in Lvnnfield, Feb. 
21, 18^4, aged 85 years.' 

418 — Timothy 6 , b. about 1754. He was a 
private in Captain Ezra Newhall's 
Lynn Co. of Minute Men which 
marched April 19. 1775. on the Lex- 
ington alarm. May 4, 1775, he enlisted 
under the same captain in Col. John 
Mansfield's Regiment, later com- 
manded by Lieut. -Col. Israel Hutch- 
inson and served in that command 
during the year. He probably was 
the man of that name who was a 
gunner in Capt. Pnilip Marrett's Co., 
Col. Thomas Craft's Artillery Regi- 
ment, from April 30, to Dec. 30, 17< 7. 
He married in I ynn June 26, 1783, 
(not Feb. 27, 1762, as given in San- 
derson's "Lynn :n the Revolution") 
Kate Sherman, <:au of Xathaniel and 
Susannah (Burnitt) Sherman of Lynn. 
She was b. Feb. 27, 1762. 

419 — Joshua 6 , b. Apr. 29, 1757, was a pri- 
vate in Capt. Ezra Ne.vhall's Co., 
whi :h marched from Lynn on the 
Lexington alarm of April 19, 1775. 
He enlisted May 5, 1775, under the 
same company commander in Col. 
John Mansfield's (later Lieut. -Col. 
Israel Hutchinson'-) Regiment and 
served through the year. His mar- 
riage intention to Katharine Bryant 



of Andover was recorded in Lynn in 
^June — , 1778. She evidently died 

ai.d he married Lois (-ander- 

son give- her f imilv name as Br- 
She was the mother of all his • 
children whose births are record 
Lvnnfield district. Sanderson states 
that -he d. Feb. 21, 1824, at 'he ; ; ^e 
ot eighty-five, a* d that he died at his 
daughter's in Wakefield, Feb. 1 1, 1 - I J. 

171 

Ophin Burxam 5 , son of Lieut. 
Thomas and Margaret (Boardman) 
Burnam, was. bap. in Ipswich, 10: 
6m:1712. He removed to Sutton, 
Mass. In the "History of the Town 
of Sutton," (p. 412), written by 
Messrs. Benedict and Tracy, it is 
erroneously stated that he "was an 
Englishman by birth." They also 
state that he was admitted to the 
church in Sutton in 1742 by letter 
from the church in Norwich, Conn. 
His name does not appear in the list 
of members of the church in Norwich. 
(N. E. H. Gen. Lib.) His father 
Lieut. Thomas, in his will dated April 
3, 1759, gave to him land and hous- 
ings in Sutton. He married in Sut- 
son. Feb. 28, 1759, Mary Stone. The 
date of the birth or baptism of six 
children born to them in Sutton be- 
tween 1759 and 17(38 is given in the 
Sutton. Vital Records, p. 27. The 
latest date given in Sutton is 1768. 
He may have removed with his fam- 
ily to Xew Hampshire, as a man of 
that name from that state lost a crun 
at White Plains valued at £2:0S:00. 
(See N. H. Rev. Rolls v. 3. p. 531.) 
An Often Burnam was a resident of 
Hinsdale, X. H., in 1781. (See X. H. 
Town Papers, v. XII p. 217.) 
(To be continued. 



(&rttm<*m $c (Sommntt 



on ^oafi^ anb ®tlier ^ubjectf? 



A Foss Genealogy. 

The history of the Fosses, of which 
family the present Governor Eugene N. 
Foss of Massachusetts is the most distin- 
guished member, is soon to be published 
by the compiler, Guy S. Rix, of Concord, 
N. H. He complains that many of the 
Massachusetts families neglect to send him 
their information, and gives warning that 
it will be too late for publication if de- 
layed longer. a. w. d. 



History of Salem Witchcraft Trials. 

To the tremendous literature of witch- 
craft has been added a "Short History of 
the Salem Village Witchcraft Trials", by 
M. V. B. Perley, of Salem, Mass. It is a 
small cloth volume of 76 pages, intended 
for the use of tourists interested in witch- 
craft. The book does not pretend to phil- 
osophize or explain. Its first 30 pages 
are given over to the briefest kind of a 
chronology of the inception of the delusion, 
followed by 40 pages' of verbatim copies 
of the court records bearing on the trials. 
There are six full-page illustrations and 
several maps and diagrams. a. w. d. 



Unknown Genealogies. 

Many genealogies are printed for private 
use, and so strictly are the few copies 
struck off held from public view, that even 
the leading genealogical libraries are igno- 
rant of their existence. Such a one recently 
was sent into the New England Genealogic 
Historical Society as a donation. It had 



been printed in Massachusetts forty-four 
years ago! — a genealogy of the Ball and 
Weston families, with a poem by Reverend 
J. E. B. Jewett, of Pepperell, Mass.; forty 
pages; printed at the Sentinel Office in 
Fitchburg, in 1S67. a. w. d. 



A Criticism of Charles Francis Adams and 

His Recent Book "George Washington 

a Poor General." 

To the Massachusetts Magazine: 

Eugenics treat of inborn, inheritable 
capacities and tendencies. The author of 
"George Washington a Poor General" was 
born in Massachusetts with an inherited 
tendency to detraction of Washington, the 
Virginian. 

During the Valley Forge period, political 
as well as military enemies of the Com- 
mander-in-Chief tried by adroit and un- 
scrupulous assiduity to place Gen. Conway, 
or Gen. Gates, or Gen. Lee, or Gen. Mifflin 
in his place. Active in these machinations 
was John Adams, also James Lovell. 
Both these Massachusetts men calumniated 
his motives ar.d disparaged his abilities. 

To the end of his days, John Adams 
never praised Washington without expla- 
nations and reservations. In 1807, he 
said to Dr. Benj. Rush:—" He was a Vir- 
ginian. This is equivalent to fine talents. 
Virginia geese are all swans. They trum- 
pet one another with most pompcus and 
mendacious panegyrics." Washington had 
then been eight years in his tomb. 

After the British Navy and Hessians 
were foiled, 22nd October, 1777,— at Fort 



CRITICISM AND COMMENT 



201 



Mercer, he " Thanked God the glory could 
not be ascribed to Washington!" 

I believe in the estimate had of Wash- 
ington by his men rather than in the opin- 
ions of some of his living reviewers. The 
solid foundation of history is in the re- 
corded writings of its contemporaries. 
Washington's army respected, trusted and 
loved him. 

He had strategy and ability enough to 
make use of proper means to attain ends. 
His troops were crude and discordant and 
mutable until Valley Forge was evacuated. 
He brought Congress to his way of think- 
ing and, after 19th December, 1777, he 
lost no battles. 

Faithful to the prejudices of his ancestry 
and the convictions of Cavalry service, this 
latest detractor believes himself ordained 
to pick flaws in Washington. All the same, 
the rifle, — not the carbine, — is the aristo- 
crat of the battle field. The infantry is 
the only self-supporting arm of any army, 
and the disparagements of any cavalryman 
cannot change the fact that the infantry is 
the backbone of every array. This was 
true in Valley Forge days and is true now. 

Even W. E. H. Lecky said Washington 
had a thorough technical knowledge of his 
profession of arms and its proper adminis- 
tration. 

By Brig. -Gen. Philip Reade, 
U.S.N. Army (Retired) 



The Society for the Preservation of New 
England Antiquities 

This Society, started less than two years 
ago, having for its object the preservation 
of New England antiquities, has been very 
active since its organization. 

It has issued several bulletins, in which 



it has printed very interesting accounts of 
several historic houses in Massachusetts, 
and within the present year it has been 
instrumental in saving from destruction 
the Beniiah Titcomb house, at Xewburv- 
port, the "Old Bakery" at Salem and the 
Ilsley house at Xewbury, each of which 
was on the point of being demolished to 
make way for new buildings. 

The Titcomb house has been taken by 
the Nathaniel Tracy Chapter of the D.A.R. 
for a home. 

The "Old Bakery" has been removed to 
a location near the "House of Seven Ga- 
bles" of Hawthorne fame, in Salem. The 
purchase of this house was made by Miss 
Caroline Emmerton, one of the Board of 
Trustees of the Society for the Preserva- 
tion of New England Antiquities. Miss 
Emmerton is having it thoroughly remod- 
elled and will furnish it with antique fur- 
niture in the styles of 1683 and 1750. 

The Ilsley house has been purchased out- 
right by the Society at an expense of 
$2,400. Some criticism has been made 
against the Society for the lack of histor- 
ical importance attached to this house, 
and the belief expressed that a house much 
more worthy of the funds of the Society 
could easily have been found. But it is 
explained that the persuading cause for 
deciding on this house was that the family 
interests were willing to cooperate in the 
purchase to the extent of nearly a thou- 
sand dollars. 

A museum is among the plans of the 
Society, in which it will preserve other ob- 
jects of New England antiquity. 

The membership of the Society is 300 
strong and it already has a permanent 
fund of approximately $3000. 



Rev. Thomas Ejrasklin Waters. 



ONE of the most interesting charac- 
teristics of our oldest towns and vil- 
lages is the "Common" or "Green," 
the fair open space, in the center of the 
community, that was set apart when the 
settlement was made. Various motives 
may have influenced our forefathers in this 
reservation. Perhaps the remembrance of 
the English churches, they had left behind, 
set in their broad green parks, or sur- 
rounded by the church-yards, wherein 
many generations lay in their quiet sleep » 
moved them to reserve an open field about 
their humble meeting houses. It may be 
that the necessity of a training-field, or a 
place for the public exposure and punish- 
ment of law-breakers, or the strategic ad- 
vantage of defence against hostile Indians 
led naturally to the preservation of the 
Meeting House Green, with its fort and 
watch house, and the neighboring stocks 
and w' ipping post, or the training field, 
free from private encroachment. Very 
jealously they guarded this little public 
domain, and fall discussion and a favorable 
vote at Town Meeting was necessary be- 
fore even a horse-shed, or some temporary 
structure could be set on any part of it. 
Thus the Common has been preserved, and 
now economic and aesthetic considerations 
that never entered the minds of the sturdy 
pioneer settlers will always keep and beau- 
tify it. 

Unfortunately, all the rest of the great 
public domain was granted either directly 
to individuals in the earliest days, or at a 
later period to various bodies of Common- 
ers, or free hold Proprietors, through whose 
hands it passed eventually into individual 



holdings. Without thought for any pub- 
lic right or interest, in their own time or 
in future generations, the towns-folk 
granted the shore lands, with their beauti- 
ful sand-beaches, or picturesque cliffs and 
ledges, beaten by the surf, the banks of 
tidal streams and the rivers, the shores of 
lakes and ponds, and the lofty hill-tops, to 
private owners. Shore properties were 
bounded by low-water mark. It was stip- 
ulated sometimes, to be sure, that a man 
might not fence his lot to the tidal bound 
without making a gate or turn stile for 
the use of fishermen, or chance travellers 
along the shore, and a public way a rod or 
two wide was often reserved for towage of 
vessels, cartage, and common public uses. 
Beyond this the real public right of the 
citizens of the community was forever 
debarred. 

TOWN records of the eighteenth cen- 
tury show how keenly this over-gen- 
erous but unwise policy was already 
a matter of debate and quarrelling. In- 
numerable committees were always being 
appointed to see what right the public had 
in water-ways, and beach rights, and many 
localities, to which access was forbidden 
by private owners, but with little gain to 
the public. The individual right was in- 
variably maintained against the universal. 
But it remained for the present generation 
to discover the full significance of this fatal 
error of the forefathers. 

AS long as these disputed rights were 
vested in the men of the town, little 
attempt was made to restrict public 
use. The time-honored privilege of free 



OUR EDITORIAL PAGES 



203 



access to beach, and cliff, and hill-top, to 
the wooded lake-side, or shady grove, with 
its cool spring and brook was recognized 
as a quasi-right, which a good neighborly 
spirit must respect. But the man of 
wealth, anxious for his own pleasure, and 
callous to all the rights of immemorial use, 
forgetful of the unwritten law of good 
neighborliness has now arrived. He has 
built his beautiful summer home in the old 
shore pastures, or on the sightly hill tops, 
and a surly "Xo trespassing" bars the way 
to the old pleasure haunt. Shore, and 
lakeside, and hill top are fenced and 
guarded, and the most quiet and well- 
behaved person, who comes without invi- 
tation, is made to feel that he is an unwel- 
come intruder. Hardly a year passes with- 
out fresh and painful evidence appearing 
that the public right of way and privilege 
to enjoy for a few bright summer hours, 
the old beach, or grove, or hill top, is 
churlishly forbidden. Only the home door- 
yard, the dusty street, and the little 
Common, providentially safe-guarded 
against the great land-owner, remain to 
the tired work people and restless children. 

WHAT can be done about it ? Resort 
to legal measures to regain lost 
privileges is expensive, and gener- 
ally the legal title of the new owner is 
acknowledged and his legal right to defend 
the privacy of his own preserves is unques- 
tioned. Occasionally an ancient shore path 
through beautiful estates is recovered to 
the public by legal process, but public 
enjoyment of the old way is impossible 
under the new conditions. Neither can 
much be expected from the kindly courtesy 
of the lord of the manor in granting of his 
own free will, what he cannot be compelled 
to yield. The splendid forests, which lend 
unspeakable dignity and beauty to the 
White Mountains, and give pleasure to 
thousands and tens of thousands, would 



-have been given to the axe by their owners 
regardful only of their pecuniary worth 
and wholly unmindful of the demand of 
the whole nation that they be preserved, 
had not the prospect of purchase by the 
United States stayed their hand. 

FORTUXATKLV the preservation of 
these great forests became a ma-'er of 
national interest, and in our own Com- 
monwealth, a Commission has done splen- 
did service in securing Mount Tom, Mount 
Holyoke, and not a few other sightly and 
beautiful locations as perpetual reserva- 
tions, and the Metropolitan Park Commis- 
sion has secured title to miles of beautiful 
sea-beach. But the local question remains 
in many communities, where the interest 
involved is not sufficient to warrant the 
action of a Sta'e Commission. The famous 
view from the familiar hill, the old foot 
path by the river side, the exhilaration of 
a day on the sea sands, can be preserved 
only by purchase, and there is no money 
available. But public necessitv may open 
the way In old Ipswich the ancient burv- 
ing ground at the foot of Town Hill, has 
reached upward, terrace by terrace, un'il 
at last, as a measure of public need the 
summit has been secured, and the dead 
are laid to rest in a scene of idyllic beauty. 
Many other hill tops may await this noble 
and reverent use. 

TOWXS and villages may purchase 
lands for parks, and an awakened 
public sentiment may demand that 
such purchases be made. Local Improve- 
ment Societies have frequently been able 
to accomplish great things for the general 
good. Xow and then a generous individual 
has acquired and then given the coveted 
spot to the public. 



B 



UT the question is not only how to 
recover what has been lost, but how 
to preserve permanently that which 



mm 



264 



THE MASSACHUSETTS MAGAZINE 



is still open and free. Generous individu. 
als are willing that favorite haunts, within 
their own estates, should be visited freely 
by all, but a change of owner may end the 
privilege. By wise appeal to the present 
owner, may not a legal and perpetual pub- 
lic privilege be secured? Well advised and 
reasonable agitation of this question of 
perpetuating public rights is highly desir- 
able. 

Would-be benefactors of the town, where 
they were born and g-ew to maturity, may 
come to realize that a monument or library, 
school or hospital, may not be the only 
gift, which their townsmen would welcome. 
Some noble hill, like Powow, or Bald Pate, 
some beach like the lonely and grand 



stretch of Plum Island sands, some noble 
cliff like the lofty Pokumtuck Rock, jut- 
ting from the mountain side a thouasnd 
feet above the Deerfield valley may be 
given to the town as a perpetual park, and 
the pure pleasure thus secured will make 
the gift well worth while. 

PUBLIC opinion is moving right al- 
ready. School gardens and public play 
grounds are being provided, parks are 
being secured, the house beautiful and 
town beautiful are becoming familiar catch 
words. The preservation of the familiar 
and beloved trysting places with Nature 
is a natural extension of this enlightened 
and promising civic ambition. 






*• *> 






. 






^ 







7%3? 



\ 



< 



-.3 in Lit 

- 

■ 
- 



Fa Old H 

■ 





















: 






x$6d, &x** *''v >v&?Ied &t 'Idsi'- through : -tt 






-. f-3 



. 



i 







• 



-• 



POE'S PORTRAIT 

eh appears on the frc . 
:om Halling'fi portrait— the favorite pic- 
i of Mrs. Sarah Helen Whitman. By kind 
ion of Miss Amelia Poe, Baltimore, Md. 



Our 

Famous OU Houses 

Nearly < rery town ihaasomc 

id mark f 
clusters some oJd legend or tuoriatian . 

celebrated in the neigh V.'e wil to get 

s of all such ! p a y 11.00 apiece 

for all that we can u*<?. 
description of the house. 



Some Articles Concerning 
Massachusetts in 

Recent Magazine 

We would like to call the attention of Libra- 
rkns and iers to the fact that the Index to 

Mass- 5 bibliography in the periodicals, 

conducted by Cha; I. Flag'g of the Library 
of Congress, is & continuation of his notable 
volume, "A Guide f achusetts Local His- 

i®iy"v/,. iwaspu 3d in 1908. That work 
was so valuable ' r . much appreciated by 
hisic ,ar aim has been 

to I if ^e series of contributions supplement 

the bib!- ; iphy in that volume, and keep it 
ever tip to date. 



Omental History Series 

on C jIoii r ' rg . . 

1. They ai .- Dr. F. 

•.-.' ' Mass-j and 

' ■• ■ rr .... . ■ .; 

• ' 

rail 

1 



State Ships and Privateers 

We wish to call special attention to 
pleteness of the 

value as i 
tions I 

The 

July. 




/ 



}& 

' 



t '. 






. 






State Ships and Privateers 

We wish to c"!i special attention to the com* 
■ of the histories of the 

:-" ' ' ; : .. ; ri 

. olution. Their value as cor 
3os to Atnerican naval history can hardly I e 

tts Stat--; vessel "i.uic An G: 
lananded by Captain Ingraham will appear in 
e issue for July. 



Out Series of 

Famous Old Hous 

a historic r it i 

1 or 
celebrated in the neighborhood 

I all such aa d 
for all .. in u*e. Send 

description of the house. 



mm ■..'OR EUGENE N. FOSS. 



We will have an article on the present Governor 
cf Ma^'sacfc ts in the October number, from the pen 

of Dudley M. Holman, who has probably been more 
closely idem: i . ith his administration and on terms 
of greater intimacy with Mr. Fcss as Governor than 
any other person, 



I -.P. AA 
- Coma 
( ■ - 



Reg ^tory S 

?ie Wbodbp : i 

...... ;s thai took pare in ■ 

i , , ■ - 

. 



H 






I 
fc : £ 



■ I 

■1 



Governor Eugene N. Fcsi 



Hi u 



^ r >... A ,{! : -1 ^ "•-,■ • "'•* V/\r". ' ' 7' >$ 



7 



i 



cc 

Sc xts regarding the Numbers from Massachusetts in 

: ^2 \ r of the Revolution. 

The State of Massachusetts furnished for army and na 
service in the Civil War 159,165 men.* The total number of 
Massachusetts men who served on sea and land during the Revo- 
lutionary War has been e d as between 135,000-f and 140,0 
The population he State in 1776 was 338,6271 and in 1856 
amounted to 1,26.7 1 . This means that during the Civil War 12 
per peril of the population saw service, while in the Revolutionary 
War o 39 pz.r cent sa 1 -ice. A complete history of 
nearly every regiment in the Civil War has already been published 
and 1:h - Jeni on behalf, ,0 yet this is the only 
attempt made to write the ■ of the organi 
achievements and ; i rmel of ents in the Revoluti 

or§ The history of Colo-. lei Gerrish's Regiment in t! 

issue she ■: how thoroughly ;e individual histories are 

prepared. The twelve regi Lents a] . 1 ned in the 1" 

four volun e: 

Colo. Glc : Regiment 

Colonel Wm, Pr* . at 

Colonel en's Regiment 

Colore! Timothy Do ?ii y s Regiment 

Colonel < 1 Regim 

Col< aent 

Colonel moihy 

Colo at 

Colonel J Ft . ■ iment 

Coloi tel jiment 

The folio ;..regi will appear in the order given 

beginning with jonooryo o"; 0,0 

Colonel Eb nt 

Colo m Grea ton's Re: 

Colon Bailey's Reo 

Col 3 timent 



''' sport : I lb ftx O ■ - i5. 

fK itmenmthft "Hi 

' ■ ■' ': i i i ■ ' v. 

■ y '.' I: . . . 

' - "aci ■ ; 1 I ■ ■ tS rs i . 1 ■ ■ 

a Onsen the three ret 

then a a; ■ -. . - ... - , 



r' 



' 



/ 



< A 



mwmmw 

IPDsics® &mdl 

w 



m 



, T\17 



GZ 







I C=J C=J O t=!C=Zl 



B\ R. A, DC 3-LITHGOW, M.D., LL.D, 



AN EN HISTORICAI 

■ RI E CE WORK i 

EVERY town, riv« 3 or -mountain in New 

England with a name of Indian origin is given. 
Besides many oth 3 of localities and places that are 
■ itioned in & ' ! and litei : : of the 



r.o! 



six Nc w S ' 

Mr, jam : . [ooneyof the Bureau of Eih- 
Was3 ogl '.—the greates 



tit lag an thorit] 01 ... 
snatol -■•-'..■ follows, in 3T&* ,-'■ 

«ra« Anthro'j c legist, Vol, i2 ; No. i. Jan. te 
March* 1910: — ■ 

"This gazetteer is witl estion the 

mo I comj -:. tn'an itory com- 

pendiutn oi '- n En : . • ' :a 

Without " . ■ ■ 

ed ge ;•; : , ; . . t.g to at-- 

. -—. the ] ■■■ i 

analysis h or has ought 

- ; . . . ever 
notable 'iaterj 

: I • ■ ! ... ; 

■ i la 
the same i 



in co 



to support an impossible rendering. Tt 

cat; cot be 

- - - : 

rh nice phonetic dt»- 

.id by a tt a r 
■ . 

»il prrserv- 
• the case • 

j, while fa 

- 

cedai 

i 

- 
... 









INDEX OF AUTHORS AND SUBJECTS FOR 
VOLUME IV, MASSACHUSETTS MAGAZINE 



Prepared by Frank A. Gardner. M.L), 

Authors' names italicized 



Adams, Charles Francis, "George Wash- 
ington a Poor General," A Criticism, 260. 
American Revolution, Department of, 43, 

110, 179, 244. 
American Revolution, Naval Song of the, 

116. 
American Revolution, The Beginnings of, 

Reviewed, 132. 
Baldwin's Regiment, 1775, 221. 
Bond's Regiment, 1775, 253. 
Boston Public Library, 3. 
Cathcart, Capt. John, 46. 
Chapman, John E., "The History of King's 

County, N. S.", reviewed, 133. 
Chase, Ellen, "The Beginnings of the 

American Revolution", 132. 
Chase, Lieut. Wells, 49. 
Criticism and Comment Department, 58, 

132, 160. 
Curtis, Capt John, 246. 
Cashing, Arthur Boardman, The Dorothy 

Quincy Homestead, Quincy, Mass., 96. 
Dennis, Albert W., A Foss Genealogy, 260. 
Review of Short History of Salem 

Village Witchcraft Trials, 260. 

Unknown Genealogies, 260. 

Dewey, Louis M., The Moseley Homestead, 

Westfield, Mass., 211. 
Dorothy Quincy Homestead, Quincy, 

Mass., 96. 
Douglas- Lithgow, R A., Boston Public 

Library, 3. 

Jethro Coffin's Home,Nantucket,23. 

Poe's Place in American Literary 

History, 75. 



Dow, George Francis, 116. 

Eaton, A. W. H., "The History of King's 
County, N. S.", reviewed, 133. 

Editorial Department, 71, 132, 199, 2G0. 

Essex County, Family Genealogies (Burn- 
nam), 60, 119, 184. 247. 

Flagg, Charles A., Massachusetts in Liter- 
ature, 49, 99, 174, 213. 

Massachusetts Pioneers, Michigan 

Series, 216. 

Foss, Genealogy, 260. 

Foss, Gov. Eugene X., 203. 

Frye's Regiment, 48. 

Gardner, Frank A., Col. Samuel Gerrish's 
Regiment, 221. 

Col. Thomas Gardner's Regiment, 

1775, 153. 

Department of American Revolu- 



tion, 43, 110, 179, 244. 

State Brigantine "Rising Empire", 

179. 
State Ship "Tartar", 43. 

State Sloop "Winthrop", 110. 

Tribute to Thomas Went worth 



Higginson, 144. 
Woodbridge's Regiment, 29, 82. 



Gardner, Lucie Marion, Family Genealo- 
gies, Essex County, 60, 119, 184, 2 47. 

Gardner's Regiment. 1775, 153. 

Genealogies, Unknown, 260. 

Gerrish's Regiment, 1775. 221. 

Hallett, Capt. Allen, 45. 

Hathorne, Capt. Daniel, 118. 

Higginson, Col. Thomas Wentworth, Trib- 
utes to, by Ex-Gov. John D. Long, 



IV 



INDEX 



Edwin D. Mead, Frank B. Sanborn, 

Frank A. Gardner, M.D., 139. 
Howland House, Plymouth, 145. 
Ingraham, Capt. "Jo.", 244. 
Jethro Coffin's Home, 23. 
King's County, Nova Scotia, History of, 

reviewed, 133. 
Laha, Capt. Samuel, 182. 
"Lincoln Galley," State Vessel, 244. 
Long, John D., Tribute to Thomas Went- 

worth Higginson, 139. 
Massachusetts in Literature, 49, 99, 174, 

213. 
Mead, Edwin D., Tribute to Thomas 

Wentworth Higginson, 140. 
Michigan, Pioneers from Massachusetts, 

Part 9, 216. 
Moseley Homestead, Westfield, Mass., 211. 
Nantucket, "The Oldest House", 23. 
New England Antiquities, Society for the 

Preservation of, 261. 
Old Planters Society, 144. 
Perley, M. V. B., "Short History of Salem 

Village Witchcraft Trials", review, 260. 
Pittsfield, 182. 

Plymouth, The Howland House, 145. 
Poe's Place in American Literary History, 

75. 



Quincy (Dorothy) Homestead. Quincy, 
Mass., 96. 

Rathbun, Rev. Valentine, of Pittsfield, 182. 

Reade, Brig. Gen. Philip, Review of 
"George Washington a Poor General", 
260. 

"Rising Empire", State Brigantine, 179. 

Salem Witchcraft Trials, History of, by 
M. V. B. Perley. reviewed by Albert W. 
Dennis, 260. 

Sanborn, Frank B., Tribute to Thomas 
Wentworth Higginson, 142. 

Sheldon, George, Review of "The Begin- 
nings of the American Revolution," 132. 

Society for the Preservation of New Eng- 
land Antiquities, 261. 

Stoddard, Francis R., Jr., The Old War- 
ren House, at Plymouth, 105. 

"Tartar", Massachusetts Ship, 43. 

Warren House, Plymouth, 105. 

Waters, Thotnas F., Our Editorial Pages, 
71, 132, 199, 260. 

Whellen, Capt. Richard, 179. 

Williams, Rev. Samuel, 245. 

"Winthrop", State Sloop, 110. 

Woodbridge's Regiment, 1775, 29. 



■ 



1 *% 

■ 



V 



Copyright, 1011 
The Salem Press Company 



^MMMM